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by Lesley. DOWNER

  • ISBN: 0701153733
  • Category: Money & Business
  • Author: Lesley. DOWNER
  • Subcategory: Small Business & Entrepreneurship
  • Other formats: docx txt txt azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Chatto & Windus; First edition (1994)
  • FB2 size: 1719 kb
  • EPUB size: 1292 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 647
Download The Brothers: The Hidden World of Japan's Richest Family fb2

Lesley Downer wrote this book with such vigour and prose that it reads like a compelling thriller To aid readers in comprehending the family structure, a family tree is provided

Lesley Downer wrote this book with such vigour and prose that it reads like a compelling thriller. That is by no mean an easy feat considering that we are discussing about a business family here but not Kennedys. Lesley made it succinctly clear in the beginning that this is not an authorised biographies of the clan but she did manage to interview people that are related to the clan directly and indirectly. To aid readers in comprehending the family structure, a family tree is provided

The Tsutsumi family is Japan's greatest business dynasty

The Tsutsumi family is Japan's greatest business dynasty. Like the Rockefellers or Gettys in the West, they have achieved a near-mythic quality. Although the Tsutsumis are constantly in the media spotlight, they have been justifiably secretive about their business dealings and their complex private lives; no one has dared to tell their true story.

The Brothers was named as one of The New York Times ‘Books of the Year’ 1995.

Here is a unique window on vast wealth and power Japanese style, taking us beyond the stereotype of pinstriped drones to a sweeping drama of Shakespearian proportions. The Brothers was named as one of The New York Times ‘Books of the Year’ 1995. Lesley Downe. as written a gripping book. traces in vivid and entertaining detail the tale of two generations of Tsutsumis. an absorbing tale of our times, entertainingly told.

Geisha: The Secret History of a Vanishing World. The Brothers: The Hidden World of Japan’s Richest Family. On the Narrow Road to the Deep North.

Praise for Madame Sadayakko. Downer is an agile and evocative writer who treats this sensational tale with consistent elegance. A delicious book, a vivid recreation of Meiji Japan and Belle Epoque Europe. Geisha: The Secret History of a Vanishing World. Published in the United States as Women of the Pleasure.

Downer, Lesley (1994). The Brothers: the hidden world of Japan's richest family. New York: Random House, Inc. ISBN 0-679-42554-3. Disgraced billionaire gets fine, not time asahi. Tycoon Tsutsumi found guilty of fraud Japan Times Online. Billionaires richer, Russia, India rise: Forbes Reuters March 8, 2007. php?title Yoshiaki Tsutsumi&oldid 913907589".

THE BROTHERS The Hidden World of Japan's Richest Family. 418 pp. New York: Random House. Naturally, he used his political connections for business advantage, and the hidden world of those connections - which flowed down to the sons - is one that readers would probably like to learn more about.

October 1995 : UK Paperback.

An authority on Japanese history and culture, Lesley Downer is the author of several acclaimed works on Japan including a travel book, On the Narrow, and The Brothers: The Hidden World of Japan's Richest Family, selected as a New York Times Notable Book

An authority on Japanese history and culture, Lesley Downer is the author of several acclaimed works on Japan including a travel book, On the Narrow, and The Brothers: The Hidden World of Japan's Richest Family, selected as a New York Times Notable Book. Having lived in Japan for a decade, she now divides her time between London and New York.

The Brothers The Saga of the Richest Family in Japan {Tsutsumi Family}
Reviews about The Brothers: The Hidden World of Japan's Richest Family (6):
Zodama
Very captivating story of a powerful business dynasty - essentially the story of a man and his two sons, and everything around them, bridging the gap from the old Japan to the new. These are not just any businessmen, but at the peak, in spite of humble beginnings, they are the richest in the world, and their lifes become closely intertwined with the inner circles of Japan. I have read other books by Downer, too, and her writing is as always detailed and colorful, rendering rich images in my mind. It also seems she's done very thorough research for the book. I've been a lot to Japan, but I still learnt so much about the Japanese society, culture and politics from this book. Recommended!
Zololmaran
This book speaks about a growth.

I felt slightly boring at first..

Believe me,
Your learning might be invaluable.

Warning: The reader might become ruthless
Jay
Very revealing and entertaining. A great book.
Mpapa
The topic of the super-wealthy in any country is interesting to many, but this one is so unique and so very "Japanese". I liked the topic, but I felt like it was more like a bland documentary on TV. I wish there was a little more contextual excitement presented. It reads a bit like a chronology in a history book.

If you like reading about Japan, it's worth checking-out.

iKnow
Sirara
I wouldn't say this book is either compelling or great, but it certainly is interesting if you are at all intrigued about international business and how it is handled in Japan. The Tsutsumi brothers are part of a dynasty begun by their very successful, ruthless father who did his best to train is sons to carry on in his image. That involved, in the Japanese way, wives, mistresses, and mingled families. In general, I found the book very repetitious and unnecessarily long. It would have read better and been less confusing, in my opinion, if the author had simply followed through with each character chronologically. He obviously did a lot of time-consuming research but following all that, the book itself seems thrown together with much less care.
I learned a lot about pre- ad post-war Japan, customs, government and business. I am familiar with the Prince Hotel in one city and had no idea of its origins. I had no idea about the Olympic incidents with the Spaniard Samaranch and bringing the Olympics to Nagano. It was interesting to see how Japan adopted baseball and adapted to ice hockey through tis family.
However, reading about the Tsutsumi family itself, the parts that weren't conjecture, was like leafing through a rather smutty low-class newspaper. Brothers Seiji and Yoshiaki were fascinating men, no doubt, who didn't get along with each other.In spite of all the detail about them we come away from the book feeling we never knew them at all. Perhaps that is really what they were like and because of their reluctance to 'go public' with the press, we have to be satisfied with a half-baked version of their personalities. By the time I realized that I really didn't care too much about the brothers or what happened to their business, I had invested too much time and energy into reading the book and felt compelled to finish it.
Too bad the book was published around 1994, before Yoshiaki was convicted of violation of securities trading, and his brother Seiji died in 2013. The book is screaming for a conclcuson.
Araath
For avid readers, this is an underrated book not to be missed. It is the story about one of Japan's most powerful, wealthiest, and influential family, the Tsutsumis. Lesley Downer wrote this book with such vigour and prose that it reads like a compelling thriller. That is by no mean an easy feat considering that we are discussing about a business family here but not Kennedys. Lesley made it succinctly clear in the beginning that this is not an authorised biographies of the clan but she did manage to interview people that are related to the clan directly and indirectly. To aid readers in comprehending the family structure, a family tree is provided. A map of Japan is shown and as we slowly read through the book, we would start to appreciate the tentacles that the Tsutsumis are spreading through Japan over the years. Later in the book, we would find out that the territory would branch off overseas. The book is separated mainly into three major components: first, the founding father by the name of Yasujiro and subsequently, Seiji and lastly, Yoshiaki. There is also a mention of the sister, Kuniko (the so-called black sheep of the family and who would eventually path her way in Paris). There are discussions about Yasuhiro's wives and mistresses, business and political intrigues, and how that would eventually pass down to the younger generations; how the two brothers would tackle business in dramatically different ways. After reading this book, I can say that I have better appreciation of major corporations such as Saison and Seibu which the brothers have created, how much business and politics are interrelated in Japan, how management attitudes are changing over the years (what is deemed necessary and relevant post World War 2 might not necessarily be as effective in this modern days), the winter Olympics held in Nagano and the list goes on. I have no hesitation in recommending this book for those Japanophiles. A book written about Japan by a Japan-enthusiast. Highly recommended.

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