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by Sean Pratt,Gary Hamel

  • ISBN: 1596591617
  • Category: Money & Business
  • Author: Sean Pratt,Gary Hamel
  • Subcategory: Management & Leadership
  • Other formats: docx mbr lrf lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Gildan Media; Unabridged edition (April 1, 2008)
  • FB2 size: 1922 kb
  • EPUB size: 1505 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 443
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The future of management is an ok book, more like a toned down east coast consumable version of leading the revolution. This is a book for thinkers rather than practioners

The future of management is an ok book, more like a toned down east coast consumable version of leading the revolution. This is a book for thinkers rather than practioners. Pushing this analogy, the style of The Future of Management is 80% Drucker and 20% Tom Peters. For me, Hamel's groundbreaking work is still Competing for the Future

In The Future of Management, Gary Hamel argues that organizations need management innovation now more . The make-or-break challenges that will determine competitive success in an age of relentless, head-snapping change. The toxic effects of traditional management beliefs.

In The Future of Management, Gary Hamel argues that organizations need management innovation now more than ever. Why? The management paradigm of the last century-centered on control and efficiency-no longer suffices in a world where adaptability and creativity drive business success. To thrive in the future, companies must reinvent management.

The Future of Management provides forward-thinking companies with a disciplined process for radical management innovation-in . Author(s): Gary Hamel, Bill Breen. Narrator(s): Sean Pratt.

The Future of Management provides forward-thinking companies with a disciplined process for radical management innovation-in other words, a formula for success. Product Number: BX00007146. Product Number Z01259.

World renowned business sage Gary Hamel argues that organizations need bold management innovation now more than ever. The current management model, centered on control and efficiency, no longer suffices in a world where adaptability and creativity drive business success. In his most provocative book to date, Hamel takes aim at the legacy beliefs preventing 21st-century companies from surmounting new challenges. Hamel explains how to turn your company into a serial management innovator, revealing: The make-or-break challenges that will determine competitive success in an age of relentless, head-snapping change.

Mr. Hamel, a co-founder of the Management Innovation Lab, offers a way for business leaders to face this onslaught through what he calls the technology of management. If companies now innovate by creating new products or new business models, he asks, why can’t they do the same in how they manage organizations?

The must-read summary of Gary Hamel and Bill Breen's book: The Future of Management Instead, the key to sustained long-term business success is management innovation.

The must-read summary of Gary Hamel and Bill Breen's book: The Future of Management. This complete summary of the ideas from Gary Hamel and Bill Breen's book The Future of Management demonstrates how the real fuel for long-term business success is never operational excellence, technology breakthroughs or even new business methods. Sooner or later, competitors will arrive who have superior operations, next-generation technology or even better business models. Instead, the key to sustained long-term business success is management innovation.

Best Practices and Advances in Program Management Series) Ajam, Mounir a - Project Management Beyond Waterfall and Agile-CRC Press (2018). The field of Genetics has been revolutionised! 16. The US President has played a. role in the peace negotiations. Without him, an agreement would not have been achieved. 17. He acted in such a. way. He ran away and left her completely alone. 18. Luckily, nothing. in the evenings than in the mornings, that is why I go to the gym after . 0 . .20. She is so pale that she looks.

The future of work in America. People and places, today and tomorrow. The US labor market looks markedly different today than it did two decades ago. It has been reshaped by dramatic events like the Great Recession but also by a quieter ongoing evolution in the mix and location of jobs

The future of work in America. McKinsey Global Institute. Since its founding in 1990, the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) has sought to develop a deeper understanding of the evolving global economy. It has been reshaped by dramatic events like the Great Recession but also by a quieter ongoing evolution in the mix and location of jobs. In the decade ahead, the next wave of technology may accelerate the pace of change. Millions of jobs could be phased out even as new ones are created.

What really fuels long-term business success?Not operational excellence or new business models, but management innovation: new ways of mobilizing talent, allocating resources, and building strategies. Over the past century, breakthroughs in the "technology of management" have enabled a few companies, including General Electric, Procter & Gamble, Toyota, and Visa, to cross new performance thresholds and build long-term advantages. Yet most companies lack a disciplined process for radical management innovation.World renowned business sage Gary Hamel argues that organizations need bold management innovation now more than ever. The current management model, centered on control and efficiency, no longer suffices in a world where adaptability and creativity drive business success. In his most provocative book to date, Hamel takes aim at the legacy beliefs preventing 21st-century companies from surmounting new challenges. With incisive analysis and vivid illustrations, he explains how to turn your company into a serial management innovator, and reveals:The make-or-break challenges that will determine competitive success in an age of head-snapping changeThe toxic effects of our legacy-management beliefsThe unconventional management practices generating breakthrough results in a handful of pioneering organizationsThe new principles every company must weave into its management DNAThe Web's potential to obliterate smokestack management practicesThe actions your company can take now to build its own management advantageGet ready to throw off the shackles of yesterday's management dogma. Tomorrow's winners will be those companies that start inventing the future of management today.
Reviews about The Future of Management (Your Coach in a Box) (7):
RUsich155
When you write a book about the future of management, there are bound to be high expectations. When that book is written by one of the more celebrated management thinkers, those expectations go even higher. With that said and recognizing that it is hard to argue with success and stature. I have to say that this book left me flat. Hammel's Future of Management is a continuation on his 2000 work Leading the Revolution (LTR) which combined high impact statements with high design that reflected the height of the internet era. In many ways, the Future of Management is a more somber continuation of the ideas in LTR.

The first section of the book poses a powerful question in terms of what comes next for management innovation. That is followed by an explanation of the importance of management innovation over operational, product and strategic innovation. The section challenges the reader to first imagine, and then invent the future of management. A noble task and one that the author tries to address but unfortunately does not deliver on to the degree that you would expect.

The second section of the book highlights a few case studies such as Whole Foods, WL Gore, and Google. The cases are well written and unabashedly positive highlighting few of the challenges and setbacks people might face in this journey. A few, even anonomyous failures would have been much more illustrative of the concepts Hamel is advocating.

The third and final section is perhaps the best part of the book as it starts to set up some ideas on what future managers and management might look like. Here the results unfortunately are what you might expect, to paraphrase - the future of management will look much like the internet. OK, but I have heard that before from others. Some of the most insightful parts of this section include: the notion of separating what from how, the idea of management DNA and motivation, and the key challenges he poses in terms of the challenges for the future of management. These challenges hearken back to Leading the Revolution and include:

Challenge 1 - Creating a democracy of ideas
Challenge 2 - Amplifying human imagination
Challenge 3 - Dynamically reallocating resources
Challenge 4 - Aggregating collective wisdom
Challenge 5 - Minimizing the drag of old mental models
Challenge 6 - Giving everyone a chance to opt in

The fourth section concentrates on IBM's Emerging Business Opportunities or EBO process and how the company was able to reignite its growth engine by managing new growth initiatives and taking R&D to the market. It's an interesting case study and a good way to wrap up the book.

The future of management is an ok book, more like a toned down east coast consumable version of leading the revolution. This is a book for thinkers rather than practioners. This is one of the reasons why it is not a 5 star rating from me. Hamel attempts to be somewhat Druckeresque, if that is a word, but does not pull off the deep systematic thinking that Peter Drucker did so well. Pushing this analogy, the style of The Future of Management is 80% Drucker and 20% Tom Peters. For me, Hamel's groundbreaking work is still Competing for the Future. If you are a fan of Leading the Revolution or a fan of Hamel you will buy this book and like it. If you are a reader studying the issues and challenges of management you will find that Hamel raises more questions than he answers and that many of the answers are ones that are already out there in the marketplace.
Coidor
Great book. This will appeal to both people who are just beginning to learn about newer management structures and people who are already familiar with them, because the author includes a lot of the basics, and asks the right questions. For some, it will contain too much convincing that a new management structure is needed. For others, the convincing is a critical part. After getting through those, the insights become deeper, and include some great examples. (For those who like this, you may greatly appreciate a book that goes into more detail and more great examples: Reinventing Organizations.)

This has great information that can be applied in either traditional organizations or more progressive (in structure and methods of leadership) so should be read by anyone interested in impacting their organization.
Rollers from Abdun
Great easy read, especially for an MBA course! Some real eye-openers, especially if you are looking to redefine your traditional management role beyond the 100-year old model we've been taught and continue to practice, despite knowing better.

The title says it all, "the future of management." You'll read examples of companies who are finding new (and arguably, better) ways to look after employees. Business models have changed so much in the last few decades, especially with Internet access to global markets, that you wonder how the traditional business management style has weathered the storm. I'm not suggesting that we flush the "old" system, by any means. But there are several observations of different styles that can (and should) be incorporated into the modern business manager's toolkit.
Stoneshaper
In the preface to this text, the authors indicate that their goal is "to help [the reader] become a 21st-century management pioneer; to equip [the reader] to reinvent the principles, processes, and practices of management for our postmodern age", but that "this is not a compendium of best practices. It's not filled with exhortations to 'go thou and do likewise'". In addition, Hamel and Breen go on to write that "this is a book for dreamers and doers. It's for everyone who feels hog-tied by bureaucracy, who worries that the 'system' is stifling innovation, who secretly believes that the bottleneck is at the top of the bottle, who wonders why corporate life has to be so dispiriting, who thinks that employees really are smart enough to manage themselves, who knows that 'management', as currently practiced, is a drag on success - and wants to do something about it." In some sense, within the closing lines of this book the authors reiterate their goal in writing this book, which "was not to predict the future of management, but to help [the reader] invent it. At every turn, [the authors] have argued that the technology of management must be reinvented, and will be reinvented. The only question is: Who's going to do the reinventing?" So for any reviewers here who are disappointed that this book does not attempt to predict the future of management, the authors make it clear throughout their discussion, right from the outset, that this was not their goal. On many levels, "The Future of Management" provides an excellent follow-up discussion to Christopher D. McKenna's "The World's Newest Profession: Management Consulting in the Twentieth Century" (see my review) because the latter text discusses how management philosophy became ubiquitous to begin with over the course of the last century. The authors first discuss why management innovation matters, and then provide case studies of management innovation in action, followed by discussions on imagining and building the future of management. Hamel and Breen make a convincing case that management innovation, "anything that substantially alters the way in which the work of management is carried out, or significantly modifies customary organizational forms, and, by so doing, advances organizational goals", sits at the top of the innovation stack, below which reside strategic innovation, product/service innovation, and at the base, operational innovation. The Whole Foods Market, Google, and W.L. Gore case studies are well done, and the accompanying lessons at the conclusion of each of these case studies far exceed similar attempts of most business texts of which this reviewer is familiar, including many from Harvard Business School Press, the publisher in this case.

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