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by Braxton M. Alfred

  • ISBN: 0387965009
  • Category: Math & Science
  • Author: Braxton M. Alfred
  • Subcategory: Mathematics
  • Other formats: mobi docx txt doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Springer; 1 edition (August 20, 1987)
  • Pages: 190 pages
  • FB2 size: 1121 kb
  • EPUB size: 1242 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 363
Download Elements of Statistics for the Life and Social Sciences (Springer Texts in Statistics) fb2

Springer Texts in Statistics. Springer Texts in Statistics.

Springer Texts in Statistics. Elements of Statistics for the Life and Social Sciences. In a very real sense the purpose is partially to compensate for the inadequacies of my professors. Perhaps this is what education is about. The effort has not been an unqualified success, but it has been extremely gratifying. I was trained in anthropology.

This book was written to myself at about the time I began graduate studies in anthropology-the sort of thing a Samuel Beckett . Part of the Springer Texts in Statistics book series (STS). eBook Packages Springer Book Archive. Print ISBN 978-1-4612-9138-1.

Part of the Springer Texts in Statistics book series (STS). Online ISBN 978-1-4612-4744-9.

Open Books of the Springer Texts in Statistics series (English only). Optimization, Kenneth Lange (2004). Monte Carlo Statistical Methods, Christian P. Robert & George Casella (2004). Statistical Analysis and Data Display - An Intermediate Course with Examples in S-Plus, R, and SAS, Richard M. Heiberger & Burt Holland (2004). Statistics and Finance - An Introduction, David Ruppert (2004). All of Statistics - A Concise Course in Statistical Inference, Larry Wasserman (2004). Statistical Analysis of Financial Data in S-Plus, René A. Carmona (2004).

Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Elements of Statistics for the Life .

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This book is directed to advanced students who are encountering statistics . Published August 20th 1987 by Springer (first published September 1986). Be the first to ask a question about Elements of Statistics for the Life and Social Sciences.

This book is directed to advanced students who are encountering statistics without a background in either mathematics or the logic of science. The ultimate goal is to present the basic concepts and mechanics of hypothesis testing through examples from the journals. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

In a very real sense the purpose is partially to compensate for the inadequacies of my professors. Alfred: Elements of Statistics for the Life and Social Sciences Berger: An Introduction to Probability and Stochastic Processes Bilodeau and Brenner: Theory of Multivariate Statistics Blom: Probability and Statistics: Theory and Applications Brockwell and Davis: Introduction to Times Series and Forecasting, Second

The book would be ideal for statistics graduate student. .These texts are huge and give a very realistic idea of the background it would take to learn this material

The book would be ideal for statistics graduate student.This book really is the standard in the field, referenced in most papers and books on the subject, and it is easy to see why. The book is very well written, with informative graphics on almost every other page. These texts are huge and give a very realistic idea of the background it would take to learn this material. For something which isn't quite as dense but could serve as an alternative to Elements of Statistical Learning, I prefer Izenman's Modern Multivariate Statistical Techniques, which covers a lot of the same material.

This book was written to myself at about the time I began graduate studies in anthropology-the sort of thing a Samuel Beckett character might do. It is about the conduct of research. In a very real sense the purpose is partially to compensate for the inadequacies of my professors. Perhaps this is what education is about. The effort has not been an unqualified success, but it has been extremely gratifying. I was trained in anthropology. After completing the Ph. D. I went to Stanford on a post-doctoral fellowship. At the time, this was a novelty and the depart­ ment was not prepared for such a thing. To stay occupied I began attending lectures, seminars, and discussion groups in mathematics and statistics. This was about the luckiest choice I ever made. The excitement was easily as intense as that which I experienced upon encountering anthropology. On one oc­ casion I innocently and independently proved a theorem that had first been done 2000 years earlier. It is currently used as an exercise in high school mathematics so it is neither difficult nor arcane. Learning all this did not tarnish my sense of discovery. (On reflection I am puzzled by my failure to have seen all this "beauty" when I was exposed to it as an undergraduate. The unparalleled excellence of the Stanford program was undoubtedly responsible for my belated conversion.

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