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by James Stone,Becky Mason,Max Finkelstein

  • ISBN: 1896219985
  • Category: Math & Science
  • Author: James Stone,Becky Mason,Max Finkelstein
  • Subcategory: Biological Sciences
  • Other formats: docx lrf mbr mobi
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Natural Heritage (November 29, 2004)
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • FB2 size: 1318 kb
  • EPUB size: 1954 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 958
Download Paddling the Boreal Forest: Rediscovering A.P. Low fb2

Rediscovering . Low. Max finkelstein & james stone. Foreword by Becky Mason.

Rediscovering . Box 95, Station O, Toronto, Ontario M4A 2M8. ww. .For more information on Max Finkelstein and James Stone's adventures in Quebec and Labrador, visit ww. addletheboreal. Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication.

Paddling the Boreal Forest book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Paddling the Boreal Forest: Rediscovering . Low as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The boreal forest of Quebec/Labrador - some of the most rugged and isolated land in Canada - has captivated avid canoeists for generations. In the latter 19th and early 20th centuries, the intrepid . Low of the Geological Survey of Canada spent, in total, more than ten years of his working life surveying the area. Employing Aboriginal canoemen and guides, he travelled by canoe, snowshoe and sailing vessel to map and document much of this vast territory. Challenged by the mystique of this extraordinary Canadian, canoeists Max Finkelstein and James Stone retraced Low's routes - by their.

James Stone works as an economist at the Department of International Trade Canada. He first rediscovered . Low while a student at Queen’s University and kept the idea of writing the biography of this man in the back of his mind since then. Jim has varied northern experience, including geodetic mapping in northern Quebec and the Yukon, canoeing the Nahanni, the Hanbury/Thelon Rivers, and now the Eastmain and Rupert Rivers. On a posting in Brussels he also helped to keep the European market open for Canadian fur. He is currently posted in Singapore, where he ignored the hot and humid weather.

Becky Mason, Artist and Paddler, Chelsea, Quebec. Paddling the Boreal Forest: Rediscovering . Low, an extraordinary project undertaken with his friend and paddling partner James Stone, sent the two of them to northern Quebec to retrace and experience first-hand the routes of geologist, map-maker and explorer . Max and his wife, Connie Downes, live in Ottawa, where they are introducing their son, Isaac Thelon, to a life of travelling on and learning about rivers.

Find nearly any book by Max Finkelstein. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Low: Paddling the Boreal Forest: Rediscovering . Low: ISBN 9781896219981 (978-1-896219-98-1) Softcover, Natural Heritage, 2004. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Coauthors & Alternates. Learn More at LibraryThing. Max Finkelstein at LibraryThing.

The boreal forest of Quebec/Labrador - some of the most rugged and isolated land in Canada - has captivated avid . Paddling the Boreal Forest : Rediscovering A. P. by James Stone and Max Finkelstein.

Paddling the Boreal Forest : Rediscovering A.

Finkelstein, Max, and Jim Stone, Paddling the Boreal Forest: Rediscovering . Low, Natural Heritage Books (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2004. Ottawa Citizen, May 6, 2002, Bob Harvey, "Modernday Voyageur Pens Record of His Odyssey: Canoeist Launches Book on Paddling Trip That Followed Trail of Alexander Mackenzie. Ottawa Outdoors, fall, 2003, Allen Macartney, "Max Finkelstein: Ottawa's Paddling Guru," pp. 42-43. Cite this article Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography. APA. "Finkelstein, Max 1952-.

Max Finkelstein, James Stone (2004) Paddling the Boreal Forest: Rediscovering . Lobsticks and Stone Cairns: Human Landmarks in the Arctic. University of Calgary Press. 292. ISBN 1895176883. Retrieved February 2015.

The boreal forest of Quebec/Labrador – some of the most rugged and isolated land in Canada – has captivated avid canoeists for generations. In the latter 19th and early 20th centuries, the intrepid A.P. Low of the Geological Survey of Canada spent, in total, more than ten years of his working life surveying the area. Employing Aboriginal canoemen and guides, he travelled by canoe, snowshoe and sailing vessel to map and document much of this vast territory.

Challenged by the mystique of this extraordinary Canadian, canoeists Max Finkelstein and James Stone retraced Low’s routes – by their admission, their toughest canoe trip ever! Using archival sources, oral history and personal experience, they tell the story of A.P. Low and, in the process, reveal the environmental issues now facing this much threatened Canadian wilderness.

"Once again Max Finkelstein has blessed us with his incredible ability to make history of exploration come alive. Rather than sit behind a desk and try to imagine the ’misadventures’ Low would have had, he goes out and duplicates them, and along the way creates a few tales of his own. This is one great read and we should be thankful that people like Max and Jim Stone exist in this world of ours."- Kevin Callan, well-known author and canoeist

"From A.P. Low’s logs and reports, Max Finkelstein and Jim Stone give vitality to that great geological surveyor. Interspersed are vivid accounts of their own challenging canoe voyages on the same rivers and portages of the boreal forest and rock in the James Bay/Ungava/Labrador country of the Cree, Innu and Inuit. What emerges is an eloquent testimonial for the wilderness canoe trip in the Canadian experience." Bruce W. Hodgins, Emeritus Professor of History, Trent University; President, Camp Wanapitei; Member, Advisory Council, Canadian Canoe Museum


Reviews about Paddling the Boreal Forest: Rediscovering A.P. Low (3):
Thomand
Great read. Wish I had a detailed map to follow the routes. Noting the name changes of rivers and bays was a great help.
Cyregaehus
Well researched, well written, and well done!!
If you paddle rivers, you will enjoy this book which brings AP Low's massive achievements "back to life".
Arryar
See Max morosely viewing the map on the floor. See Max glance forlornly at his paddling partner, Jim Stone. Hear Max exclaiming, "We're lost! And we haven't left the house yet!" It's easy to sympathise with Max Finkelstein's distress. He and Stone have set themselves a daunting task. They intend following the path of one of Canada's "iron men", A. P. Low, who explored the vastness of Northern Quebec at the end of the 19th Century. Adding to the usual problems of preparations for the journey, the vagaries of Canadian sub-Arctic weather, and the endless supply of stinging or biting insects, the pair face one condition Low wouldn't have dreamt of - some of the rivers don't run the same direction any longer.
In this fine account of Albert Peter Low's travels in the northern boreal forest, Finkelstein and Stone use an unusual technique. They retell Low's records of exploration, following with their attempts to trace the trail he left. They have one great advantage. Low thoroughly recorded and mapped what he saw and where he traversed. The great disadvantage is that Low left virtually nothing of himself in the annals of Canadian explorers. The chance of bringing A. P. Low "to life", a major factor in any author's attempt to capture a subject, thus eludes these biographers. Yet, as you read this book, you'll see that you're not dealing with but "half a man".
Canoe trips are part of the weave of Canadian history. The voyageurs who brought furs from the upper Great Lakes are honoured by a bus line. Their route, however, quickly became a commute - arduous and not without peril - but the unknown was dispensed with after a few trips. A. P. Low's journeys were nearly all into territory unfamiliar to the "white" European-derived population of urban Canada. He followed rivers on the Quebec-Labrador border, scouting for timber, minerals and potential agricultural sites. He utilised whatever resources he encountered. Aboriginal guides told him of their fur-trade and hunting routes. Hudson Bay Company factories [trading posts] provided records. Low, however, merely used these aids as pointers. It was important to him to see for himself. For Finkelstein and Stone, it was important to trace his paddling and his steps. How they accomplished that makes for highly entertaining reading.
Although they had every modern convenience at their command, the authors found matching Low's pace through the forests and along the rivers a distinct challenge. Weather wasn't cooperative, although it seems little different than in Low's day. Fires, a frequent occurrence in the spruce forests, sometimes left trees toppled across the trail. That's assuming the portage was visible at all. In a delightful aberration, they recount a live interview for a CBC programme using a cell 'phone. Another device, a Global Positioning System unit, was occasionally dug from the pack, only to be apparently thwarted by heavy cloud! Finkelstein develops what canoeists delicately refer to as "diaper rash", and nauseates himself by adding the wrong "creamer" to his morning coffee.
There is another, more meaningful aspect of their journeys, however. All those rushing streams, the wildlife depending on them and the Cree who have inhabited these lands for millennia, are under threat. The Quebec government, declaring that the James Bay region must be "conquered" is diverting the rivers to feed the maws of hydro-electric generators. Finkelstein is vividly aware of what the diversion of waters will mean as he travels the Rupert River with paddling partner Alain Filion. There's more than backward-running streams, however. He knows what impact the James Bay Project has had on the Cree peoples. The building of houses and introduction of packaged food has significantly transformed their lifeways. Finkelstein asks "are the economic benefits worth the social turmoil" and emerging health problems. These are questions, he reminds us, that not only the Cree, but all North Americans must ask themselves. [stephen a. haines - Ottawa, Canada]

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