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by James H Miller

  • ISBN: 0967314003
  • Category: Math & Science
  • Author: James H Miller
  • Subcategory: Biological Sciences
  • Other formats: lrf mobi azw lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Southern Weed Science Society (1999)
  • Pages: 454 pages
  • FB2 size: 1350 kb
  • EPUB size: 1736 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 528
Download Forest plants of the southeast, and their wildlife uses fb2

Apparently, the "wildlife uses" determines most of what's in the book. Three plants which are all over the woods near my house in Piedmont NC weren't even in it.

Karl V. Miller is an associate professor of wildlife ecology and management at the University of Georgia. Apparently, the "wildlife uses" determines most of what's in the book. I finally had to have a botanist identify these plants: running cedar, shining club moss, and cyclamen-leaved ginger (not a real ginger).

This guide to common and unique plants found in forests of the Southeast thoroughly covers 330 species of forbs (herbaceous plants) .

This guide to common and unique plants found in forests of the Southeast thoroughly covers 330 species of forbs (herbaceous plants), grasses, vines, and shrubs, with a special emphasis on the plants? role in wildlife sustenance. Packed with detailed color photographs, the book is a must-have for forest landowners, game and wildlife managers, biologists, outdoors enthusiasts, students - anyone with an interest in the intricate and often unexpected interrelationships between the flora and fauna of our region?s forests

using this book will likely get in their identification

using this book will likely get in their identification. This is not a criticism of the book (one genus of sedge contains 122 species in the southeast) but it does at least attempt to point the interested amateur in the right direction if they want to make an ID. Too many books – and I can understand why – just throw their hands up and don’t even try to help amateurs with this group

This guide to common and unique plants found in forests of the Southeast thoroughly covers 330 species of forbs . com User, November 9, 2006.

This guide to common and unique plants found in forests of the Southeast thoroughly covers 330 species of forbs (herbaceous plants), grasses, vines, and shrubs,. This book is a wonderfully organized reference for anyone. It contains all important details while still remaining concise and efficient.

Florida Wildflowers in Their Natural Communities. Guide to the Vascular Plants of the Florida Panhandle. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time. University Press of Florida, Gainesville. 370 p. Castner, James L. 2005. Photographic Atlas of Botany and Guide to Plant Identification. 310 p. Other sources: Burns, . Trees of the southeastern United States. The University of Georgia Press, Athens. Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern.

This guide to common and unique plants found in forests of the Southeast thoroughly covers 330 species of. .

This guide to common and unique plants found in forests of the Southeast thoroughly covers 330 species of forbs (herbaceous plants), grasses, vines, and shrubs, with a special emphasis on the plants' role in wildlife sustenance. Packed with detailed color photographs, the book is a must-have for forest landowners, game and wildlife managers, biologists, outdoors enthusiasts, students-anyone with an interest in the intricate and often unexpected interrelationships between the flora and fauna of our region's forests.

Author Miller, James, Miller, Karl, Miller, James . Bodner, Ted, Miller, Karl . Chegg Tutors Terms of Service. Your CA Privacy Rights. Bodner, Ted, Miller, Karl V. ISBN 0820327484. ISBN13: 9780820327488. More Books . ABOUT CHEGG.

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Categories Women Men Young Adult Kids Shoes Baby Home Patio & Garden Furniture Kitchen & Dining Toys Electronics Video Games Movies, Music & Books Sports & Outdoors Beauty Personal Care Health Household Essentials Pets Grocery Luggage School & Office Supplies Party Supplies Bullseye's Playground Clearance Holiday Shop Target Finds Gifting.

portion of the plant is usually able to survive and resprout, limiting the effectiveness of this method. Forest Plants of the Southeast and Their Wildlife Uses, James H. Miller and Karl V. Miller, University of Georgia Press, Revised Ed. 2005, . 78

portion of the plant is usually able to survive and resprout, limiting the effectiveness of this method  . 78. a b c Shang, . Pan, . Li, . Miao, . Ding, H. (2011). Lonicera japonica Thunb. Ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and pharmacology of an important traditional Chinese medicine".

Really, I am interested in any book that addresses the topic of humans and their relationship with wildlife that is informative and interesting. Source(s): Forest Plants of the Southeast and Their Wildlife Uses. James H. Miller, Karl Miller. Wildlife and Natural Resource Management. Kevin H. Deal, Deal, Kevin Deal. Principles of Wildlife Management. Conservation of Wildlife Populations: Demography, Genetics, and Management.

This guide to common and unique plants found in forests of the Southeast thoroughly covers 330 species of forbs (herbaceous plants), grasses, vines, and shrubs, with a special emphasis on the plants' role in wildlife sustenance. Packed with detailed color photographs, the book is a must-have for forest landowners, game and wildlife managers, biologists, outdoors enthusiasts, students--anyone with an interest in the intricate and often unexpected interrelationships between the flora and fauna of our region's forests.

Features:Descriptions of native and nonnative (exotic or invasive) plants, including 330 species of forbs, in 180 genera: grasses, sedges, and rushes; woody vines and semiwoody plants; shrubs; palms and yucca; cane; cactus; ferns; and ground lichen650 color photosMap of physiographic provinces56 simple black-and-white drawings of flower parts, flower types, and inflorescences, leaf arrangements, leaf divisions, shapes, and margins, and parts of a grass plantGlossaryIndex of genera by family, index by wildlife species, and index of scientific and common names


Reviews about Forest plants of the southeast, and their wildlife uses (7):
Rich Vulture
I am a biologist and spend quite a bit of time in southeastern forests for my work, so I was hoping that this book would provide a resource to identify some of the plants I've encountered and their wildlife associations. However, I do not recommend this book. Here are the major reasons:

1. Often poor quality pictures. I was excited by the idea that the book had several pictures for each plants because so many plant books focus on just the flowers. While this book does offer pictures of leaves and whole plants, the pictures are often of such poor quality that they are not helpful. For example, the picture of a New Jersey Tea shrub is *completely* blurry, and it's only one example of many. Some pictures have been blown up larger than they should be, making them noisy and blurry. Other pictures have been lightened dramatically in photoshop, creating distorted edges, noise, blurriness and colors not true to life. Some of the pictures are excellent, but overall there is really poor quality control for the pictures.

2. "Wildlife" apparently doesn't mean the same thing to me as it does to the authors. If you want to know what White-tailed deer eat (hint: pretty much everything!) or about other game species such as grouse and turkey, then this is the book for you. If you want to know about wildlife as a whole—including invertebrates—then this book is not helpful. Songbirds are sometimes mentioned so it may be okay for that, but for invertebrates only the occasional butterfly will get thrown in there. Mostly it's about deer, grouse and turkeys though.

3. Not good at pointing out similar species. One of the most difficult things about identifying plants (and many animals, for that matter) is that there are so many species that look very similar. Guides should always (always, always!) include a list of similar-looking species and how to tell them apart. Otherwise you're going to get your ID wrong half the time because there was some little difference you were unaware of.

Minor issues:
1. All measurements are in metric. Again, I'm a scientist so I use metric all the time. But this isn't a book for scientists—it's a book for laypeople. For American laypeople. Telling an American that something grows 1.8 meters tall isn't going to help them at all.

2. There's a bunch of wasted space. Just totally blank areas. In fact, there is plenty of space to include range maps for the species, which would also be extremely helpful for identification purposes. By the way, did I mention there are no range maps? Just vague descriptions like "Found from CA to FL..."

3. Wrong information. I've spent enough time talking to people managing natural areas (parks, forests, etc.) to know that invasive plants are a huge problem. Autumn olive is considered one of the worst invasive species in the US. Yet in the book it is described thusly: "Autumn olive often is recommended for conservation plantings because of its excellent wildlife value. However, it may become a pest in areas due to bird dissemination of seed." In contrast with the authors' terrible information, the National Park Service describes the plant thusly: "It threatens native ecosystems by out-competing and displacing native plant species, creating dense shade and interfering with natural plant succession and nutrient cycling...Do not plant autumn olive." So actually, no, autumn olive is not recommended for anything at all and does not have excellent wildlife value. It's pretty irresponsible for the authors to claim otherwise.

I hope that you found this breakdown of the problems with the book helpful. I will most likely be returning it and trying to find a decent alternative.
Zainian
I recently pulled this book back off of the bookshelf and quickly rememberd how dissapointed I was when I first purchased it. The book may be a useful volume if you are managing land to support game animals, like deer and game birds (especially bobwhite), but doesn't seem useful for much else. If you are interested in uses by songbirds, pollinators, or caterpillars, you will find little here. Oddly, there seems to be a number of key species that have not been included, and at least a dozen of the profiles are dedicated to plant species with "no known wildlife value". Overall, the book fills an interesting niche but leaves much to be desired.
Flocton
Solid guide. Not a complete list, but it would have to be a encyclopedia set to be complete. I like the organization by forbs/grasses/shrubs/etc. My one complaint is regarding "their wildlife uses" (from the title). Wildlife uses outlined in the book is almost exclusively limited to game animals, with most of that being deer. Most (all?) of these plants have "wildlife uses". It is misleading at best to say (as the authors do) that plant after plant has "no wildlife use". A better title would have been "game wildlife uses", or maybe just "what deer eat".
Vikus
A really great book for weed and plant identification. With extra information covering leaf size and shape, growth patterns, flowering, fruit and seed production. On top of that, this book is aimed to discuss what place each plant has in the wild game food chain. Whether it is deer, rabbit, quail, song birds, moth, or butterfly, this book will tell you whose eating what, why, and when.

A great book to be able to detail the state of an ecosystem by what is being browsed upon.

I'd put this one with "Weeds of the South". Excellent!
artman
Has helped me identify a number of unknown plants on our property but hard to find a plant if you don't know anything about it. Could be indexed better, like maybe by shape of leaf, etc.
Welahza
I was very disappointed in this book. Apparently, the "wildlife uses" determines most of what's in the book. Three plants which are all over the woods near my house in Piedmont NC weren't even in it. I finally had to have a botanist identify these plants: running cedar, shining club moss, and cyclamen-leaved ginger (not a real ginger). And only two mosses/lichens in the book! There must be half a dozen in my yard alone. If it had been less expensive, I might have kept it anyway, but that, as well as a weak spine (I was afraid the pages were going to fall out), made me decide to return it. Still looking for something more comprehensive.
Jogrnd
I always take this with me on my walks through the woods. It's very helpful in identifying plants and gives you interesting facts about them (uses, native/non-native, typical habitat). The pictures are also way better than most plant guides, and I like that it focuses only on the Southeast.
Really fantastic book. Does not contain all the plants you could see, but that would make it very impractical to carry in the field. It covers a lot of the common plants you can find here in the Southeast and provides good information about each.

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