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by Richard J. King

  • ISBN: 1611682258
  • Category: Math & Science
  • Author: Richard J. King
  • Subcategory: Biological Sciences
  • Other formats: lit mobi lrf lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: ForeEdge (October 1, 2013)
  • Pages: 360 pages
  • FB2 size: 1896 kb
  • EPUB size: 1523 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 603
Download The Devil’s Cormorant: A Natural History fb2

The Devil’s Cormorant combines natural history, social and economic impacts through a series of stories, each told with compassion and humour. They are in short amazing birds, and this book is a great insight into their character and ours.

The Devil’s Cormorant combines natural history, social and economic impacts through a series of stories, each told with compassion and humour. SF Natural History Series. Thorough and authoritative as well as charming. King demonstrates his multidimensional expertise on matters relating to the sea in this excellent exploration of the world of cormorants.

The Devil's Cormorant book.

The Devil's Cormorant twists and turns through history, natural history and culture, continually serving up the . Richard King has a rare knack for seeing the large in the little, showing how a rather obscure bird actually looms large in our lives

The Devil's Cormorant twists and turns through history, natural history and culture, continually serving up the unexpected. This is a fascinating tour through time and around the world that highlights our enduring, varied and often fraught connections to nature. Richard King has a rare knack for seeing the large in the little, showing how a rather obscure bird actually looms large in our lives. This book is his gift to us. (Carl Safina, author of Song for the Blue Ocean and The View From Lazy Point: A Natural Year in an Unnatural World).

In The Devil’s Cormorant, Richard King takes us back in time and around the . I felt at best ambivalent about cormorants before reading this book; I’ll never view these birds the same again.

In The Devil’s Cormorant, Richard King takes us back in time and around the world to show us the history, nature, ecology, and economy of the world’s most misunderstood waterfowl. 2013 A best sci-tech book by Library Journal 2013-5 Association for Literature of the Environment Creative Book Award Shortlist. Richard King’s The Devil’s Cormorant explores the complex, centuries-long relationship between humans and cormorants.

The Devil's Cormorant twists and turns through history, natural history and culture, continually serving up the unexpected. Callum Roberts, author of The Unnatural History of the Sea. One of the best five books in science/technology of 2013. Library Journal, end of year ranking. Shipping: US$ . 5 Within .

Environmental History"" Richard King's The Devil's Cormorant is a brilliant book. SF Natural History Series" The Devil s Cormorant combines natural history, social and economic impacts through a series of stories, each told with compassion and humour. a post-modern ornithology. "Living Bird" King teases out this relationship from multiple y, historical, artistic, ornithological, political-in a book that is informative, personable, and fascinating. "Birding" Splendid and eclectic. British Birds" show more. About Richard J. King.

A journey through the history, biology, and culture of the misunderstood cormorant. University Press of New England.

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In this book, Richard King, senior lecturer in. .

In this book, Richard King, senior lecturer in ‘Literature of the Sea’ with the Williams-Mystic Studies program, explores this misunderstood family of birds. For a long time, cormorants have been symbols of gluttony, greed, evil and bad luck, and have led a troubled existence in human history, myth and literature. The Devil’s Cormorant follows this group of birds around the world, across seasons and through history, to explore our literary, historical, cultural, scientific, artistic and political relationship with cormorants. The Devil’s Cormorant combines natural history, social and economic impacts through a series of stories, each told with compassion and humour.

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Looks at the history, nature, ecology and economy of the cormorant, which the author argues is the world's most misunderstood waterfowl.
Reviews about The Devil’s Cormorant: A Natural History (7):
BORZOTA
Somehow I missed this book when it came out. It's likely that some of the information is out of date; a major theme in the book is that cormorants are subject to frequent human harassment and killing, and local populations can be greatly reduced or wiped out as a consequence. The birds eat fish and foul nesting sites with guano, sometimes killing trees. Segments of the fishing industry and sports fishing industry hate the birds as competitors. They are also serious menaces to fish farms, particularly catfish farming in Mississippi (at the time of writing the nation's largest fish farming effort). Hundreds of thousands of the birds have been killed in the last couple of decades, a certain irony because they were nearly wiped out by thin eggshells from the use of DDT. There are many species of cormorants (the taxonomy is contested) and the conflicts in the US are largely the double crested cormorant.

King likes his cormorants and writes very well. One feature of the book is a semi-fictional account of a year in cormorants' lives, month by month. I don't generally like such contrivance, but it works in this book. The chapters feature a lot of first-person text, so it reads more like science journalism, most definitely not like an academic study. Chapters are accounts of cormorants and their situations around the world. It starts with fishing cormorants in Gifu City, Japan, where fishing with the birds has become symbolic and a kind of performance. Chapters examine a number of species of cormorants in South Africa, Peru, Japan, the Pacific Northwest, South Georgia (that is the island near Antarctica), the Galapagos, Bering Island, and other points. The chapters can be read on their own, and are very well done, with historical context, present circumstance and with much conversation with locals (fishers as well as scientists).

Some details, not all pleasant. In 13 US states fish farmers may shoot cormorants on sight of call on federal biologists to do so and to oil nests (which kills the embryo in the egg). In 24 states cormorants may be shot, nests oiled or destroyed if they affect public resources such as fish, vegetation or other birds' roosts--essentially open season if someone wishes to pursue it, mostly at taxpayer expense.

I found these to be the best chapters. Chapter 1 describes traditional cormorant fishing in Gifu City, Japan, which is fascinating. Chapter 4 looks at shags, another name for several species of cormorants, on South Georgia. Chapter 6 discusses the bird museum at Tring (UK) and examining the preserved specimen skins there. Chapter 7 is the best, on Bering Island and the extinct Spectacled cormorant, with a lot of fascinating historical detail about the scientist George Steller, with the Bering expedition (Steller described the bird). Chapter 8 discusses a visit to the Galapagos and the flightless cormorant species there. Chapter 10 is a visit to guano islands in Peru, featuring the guanay. Chapter 11 is on cormorants around Capetown, and much about a seabird sanctuary.

Throughout the book King muses on how cormorants have been portrayed in art, fiction, and poetry (almost always highly negative). Cormorants have been a symbol for gluttony and greed, and of evil and evil.
allegro
I didn't get to read the Devil's Cormorant although I wanted to. The book I received from Amazon was strange indeed.. It was printed backward - that is it began with page 378, followed by 377, then, 376, etc. And, many of the pages were printed upside-down. A very weird version of this book. It is impossible to image how the printer allowed it out of the shop! ! And, of course, I was the poor fool who bought it!
Mr Freeman
The Devil's Cormorant is a great read for those interested in birds or anyone who enjoys crisp natural history writing. I will be buying another copy of this to give to my father, who loves bird watching; the beautiful illustrations make it a great gift. I couldn't put it down! The author's love of cormorants comes through in his excellent writing.
Felhalar
Physically, a very nice book and a fascinating natural history read. Mr. King really covers every aspect of the cormorant. Like so many other concerns related to the environment, he does a really good job providing a thorough perspective of both sides of some of the issues. My particular interest is in the conservation/ecological impact in the states, but the book covers the natural history, social and economic impacts of the birds all over the world.
Taulkree
Just finished reading the book, although I've had it for a while. I enjoyed the variety of travelogue, ecology, social study, natural/human history. Similar to many of the other books along these lines that I have read and really enjoyed (Secret Life of Lobsters, Cod, Beautiful Swimmers, Founding Fish, etc.). And the closing chapter was particular interesting after the objective, in-depth, global research King had conducted. Extensive resources and citations, which always makes me feel better about a book, too.
Use_Death
I love how King approaches the cormorant from an interdisciplinary angle, covering vast time and space while providing fascinating stories about the cormorant. He educates us through compelling vignettes of a variety of powerful and interesting relationships of different people to these unique birds. His storytelling abilities made me not want to put this book down!
Samugul
Richard King weaves an intricate story, telling the natural history of the cormorants. I will never look at this bird, or any others for that matter, the same way. The details and anthropomorphism is reminiscent of Rachel Carson's writing. To any bird lovers, or casual readers interested in learning something new, this is a fantastic read. Well written and artfully crafted, I highly recommend this book.
This was a great book. It did an excellent job of explaining relationships between humans and cormorants in different cultures.

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