» » Mapp v. Ohio: Guarding against Unreasonable Searches and Seizures (Landmark Law Cases and American Society)

Download Mapp v. Ohio: Guarding against Unreasonable Searches and Seizures (Landmark Law Cases and American Society) fb2

by Carolyn Long

  • ISBN: 0700614419
  • Category: Law
  • Author: Carolyn Long
  • Subcategory: Constitutional Law
  • Other formats: lrf azw rtf docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas (April 26, 2006)
  • Pages: 240 pages
  • FB2 size: 1515 kb
  • EPUB size: 1336 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 320
Download Mapp v. Ohio: Guarding against Unreasonable Searches and Seizures (Landmark Law Cases and American Society) fb2

Dr. Long's book about Mapp V. Ohio is an engaging and insightful look into this Supreme Court case that set precedent for many in the future.

Dr. Long's use of both primary and secondary sources contributes to a fascinating reading. I particularly like the section of the book that focuses on the aftermath of the case. it highlights why this case was so important.

Long, Carolyn (2006). University Press of Kansas. Zotti, Priscilla H. Machado (2005). Injustice for All: Mapp vs. Ohio and the Fourth Amendment. New York: Peter Lang. Stewart, Potter (1983). Supreme Court Landmark Case Mapp v. Ohio" from C-SPAN's Landmark Cases: Historic Supreme Court Decisions. v. t. e. United States 4th Amendment case law. Scope of the Fourth Amendment.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

The amendment was held to apply to state and local governments in Mapp v. Ohio (1961) via the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

This article is part of a series on the. Constitution of the United States of America. The amendment was held to apply to state and local governments in Mapp v.

Mapp v. Ohio is the centerpiece of Carolyn N. Long's careful, detailed study, but the book is about much more than the case itself, for Long also provides an extensive examination of the complex and shifting legal and political contexts in which the exclusionary rule evolved, both before. Long's careful, detailed study, but the book is about much more than the case itself, for Long also provides an extensive examination of the complex and shifting legal and political contexts in which the exclusionary rule evolved, both before and after Mapp. Issues in criminal law can and often do resonate strongly with the public (and therefore politicians), especially when crime rates appear to be soaring, as they were in the 1960s and 1970s

Carolyn Long follows the police raid into Mapp's home and then chronicles the events that led to the Court's 5-4 .

Carolyn Long follows the police raid into Mapp's home and then chronicles the events that led to the Court's 5-4 ruling in Mapp v. Ohio (1961), which redefined the rights of the accused and set strict limits on how police could obtain and use evidence. Long traces the case through the legal labyrinth, discusses the controversies it created, and assesses its impact on police behavior, as well as subsequent prosecutions and convictions of the accused. As entertaining as it is informative, Long's book features a host of intriguing characters: Mapp, her seasoned and determined attorney, A. L. Kearns, and police sergeant Carl Delau, among others. Ohio, 367 .

That is especially so now that the increasingly rightward tilt of the Supreme Court’s membership has again put the rule’s future in doubt.

Although she came to be known as merely "that girl with the dirty books," Dollree Mapp was a poor but proud black woman who defied a predominantly white police force by challenging the legality of its search-and-seizure methods. Her case, which went all the way to the Supreme Court, remains hotly debated and highly controversial today.In 1957, Cleveland police raided Mapp's home on a tip—from future fight promoter Don "the Kid" King—that they'd find evidence linked to a recent bombing. What they confiscated instead was sexually explicit material that led to Mapp's conviction for possessing "lewd and lascivious books"—a conviction that initially pitted Ohio police and judges against Mapp and the American Civil Liberties Union. At stake was not only the search-and-seizure question but also the "exclusionary rule" concerning the use of evidence not specified in a search warrant.Carolyn Long follows the police raid into Mapp's home and then chronicles the events that led to the Court's 5-4 ruling in Mapp v. Ohio (1961), which redefined the rights of the accused and set strict limits on how police could obtain and use evidence. Long traces the case through the legal labyrinth, discusses the controversies it created, and assesses its impact on police behavior, as well as subsequent prosecutions and convictions of the accused. She also analyzes Justice Tom Clark's creative use of Mapp's case to overturn Wolf v. Colorado, which had ruled that the Fourth Amendment's protection against unreasonable searches applied only to federal law, and presents Justice John Harlan's strong federalist-based dissent.As entertaining as it is informative, Long's book features a host of intriguing characters: Mapp, her seasoned and determined attorney, A. L. Kearns, and police sergeant Carl Delau, among others. Combined with her concise and insightful explanations of key legal principles—including the exclusionary rule itself—Long's deft narrative provides an ideal format for teachers and students in criminology, legal history, constitutional law, and political science, as well as anyone who loves a good story.The Mapp case is still much debated, especially in light of the recent reauthorization of the U.S. Patriot Act and the free rein given to law enforcement officers in matters of search and seizure. Long's compelling study thus poses important questions regarding privacy and individual rights that still matter today, even as it also illuminates one of the keystones of the Warren Court's criminal procedure revolution.
Reviews about Mapp v. Ohio: Guarding against Unreasonable Searches and Seizures (Landmark Law Cases and American Society) (6):
Rias
One of my favorite professors wrote this. And if she wins in the mid-term elections, she will be a member of the US House of Representatives from the Washington Third! YAY!
Erennge
Really well written and extremely insightful look into the inner workings of the court process and the thinking of the justices.
Yllk
Everything was most excellent
Redfury
Great history of the evolution of search and seizure.
Zadora
Excellent
Tam
Dr. Long's book about Mapp V. Ohio is an engaging and insightful look into this Supreme Court case that set precedent for many in the future.
Long's use of both primary and secondary sources contributes to a fascinating reading.
I particularly like the section of the book that focuses on the aftermath of the case. it highlights why this case was so important. If you are interested in historic court cases, interpretation of the Constitution, or the evolution of civil liberties, I strongly recommend this book.

Related to Mapp v. Ohio: Guarding against Unreasonable Searches and Seizures (Landmark Law Cases and American Society) fb2 books: