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by Sharon Kaye

  • ISBN: 1405163151
  • Category: Humor
  • Author: Sharon Kaye
  • Subcategory: Television
  • Other formats: docx mobi azw lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell (November 27, 2007)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • FB2 size: 1923 kb
  • EPUB size: 1902 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 928
Download Lost and Philosophy: The Island Has Its Reasons fb2

A book for those who know television doesn’t have to be a wasteland of throw-away ideas; Lost and Philosophy takes you deep into the island’s philosophical jungle. Tory Brecht, The Dispatch/Argus. Imagine a setting on your television for 'Philosophical Analysis', right next to 'Subtitles'.

Lost and Philosophy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Lost and Philosophy: The Island Has Its Reasons as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Sometimes it feels like you need a P. to follow the show  .

This book was given to me as a gift and although I have never watched one episode of 'Lost', I loved this book! .

This book was given to me as a gift and although I have never watched one episode of 'Lost', I loved this book! Each of the 22 essays revealed questions and concerns that people face everyday. Even though the book does focus on the television show and its characters, it is also relevant to you, the reader. I found this book to be not only full of deep and interesting questions, but also fun and easy to understand. If you've ever suspected that LOST had something to do w/ philosophy but never knew quite how to put it into words, this book is for you. This book has different essays on many of the various themes of the TV show: good vs. evil; fate vs. free will; faith vs. reason; etc.

Fanon(Fan created content. Distinct from hoaxes and parodies). Lost and Philosophy is a collection of 21 short essays, separated into 4 chapters covering the subjects of Love, Origin, Survival and Transformation

Fanon(Fan created content. Lost and Philosophy is a collection of 21 short essays, separated into 4 chapters covering the subjects of Love, Origin, Survival and Transformation. When Flight 815 crashes on a remote tropical island, it gets stuck in a philosophical quagmire.

Sometimes it feels like you need a P. You just need this book in which twenty-one philosophers explore the deep questions we all face as survivors on this planet: Does "everything happen for a reason"? Is torture ever justified? Who are the Others? How do we know we're not patients in Hurley's psych ward? What if the Dharma Intitiative is experimenting on us? Desmond may not be able to save Charlie, but this book could save you.

Kaye, Sharon M. Boxid. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station12. cebu on November 14, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

A book for those who know television doesn't have to be a wasteland of throw-away ideas; "Lost and Philosophy" takes you deep into the island's philosophical jungle. Tory Brecht, The Dispatch/ Argus "Imagine a setting on your television for 'Philosophical Analysis', right next to 'Subtitles'

Kaye, Sharon, ed. Lost and Philosophy: The Island Has Its Reasons (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series). Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell, 2007. ISBN 978-1-4051-6315-6.

Kaye, Sharon, ed. Munden, Kenneth White, ed. The American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures Produced in the United States: Feature Films, 1921-1930. Berkeley, California: American Film Institute (University of California Press), 1997. ISBN 978-0-520-20969-5.

1 Kasandra Barker The Island has its reasons:1 Moral subjectivism in fiction Tamar Gendler takes on explaining our comparative difficulty in imagining fictional worlds that we take to be morally deviant (56), otherwise known as the puzzle of imaginative resistance. Generally speaking, readers have no trouble believing untrue factual claims such as in Alice in Wonderland or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, but we resist claims which advocate praise or approval of immoral acts such as murder.

Sometimes it feels like you need a Ph.D. to follow the show. But you don't. You just need this book in which twenty-one philosophers explore the deep questions we all face as survivors on this planet: Does "everything happen for a reason"? Is torture ever justified? Who are the Others? How do we know we're not patients in Hurley's psych ward? What if the Dharma Intitiative is experimenting on us? Desmond may not be able to save Charlie, but this book could save you. A provocative study of the hit television show, Lost, currently in its third season and set to reach its climax in 2010 Highlights the sense in which Lost is a genuinely philosophical show Helps fans understand and navigate some of Lost’s deeper meanings Connects episodes and events in the show to core philosophical issues such as truth, identity, and morality Shows that it’s no accident that there are Lost characters names Locke, Rousseau, and Hume
Reviews about Lost and Philosophy: The Island Has Its Reasons (7):
Fegelv
I couldn't help but want to respond to all the low-rated side reviews I saw for this book with titles such as "Not for the average LOST fan" or "For Philosophy Majors only." Yes it IS for the average LOST fan, and NO it ISN'T for philosophy majors only. One guy said even the most fervent LOST fan wouldn't be able to follow the ideas of this book. All I have to say is YOU CAN DO it!

It DOES take some thought and it isn't something I would hand to my elementary school children, but are you smarter than a fifth grader?

Have you HONESTLY been watching LOST since season one and NOT thought about the themes of the show after you've turned off the TV? Have you honestly not pondered what you would do if you were Michael? Have you honestly not noticed how sometimes Locke seems to be the castaway's tribal medicine man, as much as he talks about destiny and what is SUPPOSED to happen (and then that smokehouse episode where he lost his voice and rescued Eko from the polar bear) and then followed that thought with "Jack is a doctor, the real medicine man. Hmmmm - no wonder they don't really get along." REALLY?

Well, if you have, and you like to read, then I really think you would like this book. Chances are pretty good that all the essays are something you've thought about after watching the show anyway.

But if you are still unsure, go to EW.com, Entertainment Weekly's web site, and go to their LOST page. Click "Doc Jensen's Analysis" tab and read (or search for) Season Three's "I'm Going to Hell for this" column and if that was too much for you to comprehend (or interest you), then this book is NOT for you, and that is a shame because this book could really enhance the show's viewing for its "fervent" fans. Fervent fans being those who have seen every episode. And really, are there any who haven't?
Nightscar
The consensus of Amazon customer reviews strikes me as quite accurate: a fine and thoughtful book for both fans and curious intelligent general readers. Twenty-one essays, generally a worthwhile experience, but there were some standouts...

Five chapters that the editors should be really proud of - great stuff:

The Island of Ethical Subjectivism: Not the Paradise of Lost, by George Wrisley

Meaning and Freedom on the Island, by Sander Lee

No Exit...from the Island: A Sartrean Analysis of Lost, by Sandra Bonetto

Lost's State of Nature, by Richard Davies

Lost and the Problem of Life after Birth, by Jeremy Barris

Five chapters that the editors might not be so proud of - questionable inclusions:

Should We Condemn Michael for Saving Walt? by Rebecca Vartabedian

Lost, The Third Policeman, and Guerilla Ontology, by Jessica Engelking

Lost in Codes: Interpretation and Deconstruction in Lost's Narrative, by Tom Grimwood

The Tao of John Locke, by Shai Biderman and William Devlin

Everything Happens for a Reason, by David Werther

The other 11 chapters are all solid and interesting, though somewhat lacking in the combination of analysis, insight, and sparkle of the recommended ones above. Cheers.
Fog
Somehow, I became infected with the LOST meme. If you are a fan of the show, I am sure you understand what I mean. If you are not a fan of the show, I will warn you to stay away. It is a relentless contagion! This book has only made the condition worse.
What I enjoy about the book is that it highlights my favorite aspects of the show. One could certainly enjoy LOST at various levels. Some friends and family have infatuations with various characters. Sawyer apparently is the quintessential bad boy that good girls desire, while Libby seems to be the good girl that some of real life bad boys want to turn bad. At the same time, the plot lines are complex and most often unpredictable. Most importantly, in my opinion, the show is an enjoyable example of guerilla ontology. We are challenged to new concepts and ideas through cognitive dissonance. This book provides the fans that enjoy this aspect of the show with additional views and opinions to evaluate the philosophical propositions posed in the different story lines.
For those of you who have seen the other books on my reading list, you will note I have read similar books, for example: The Simpsons & Philosophy, Lord of The Rings & Philosophy. In comparison to these other books, this particular book is pretty good, not great just good. The Simpsons book was certainly funnier, but given the subject matter, one would expect as much. Just like the other books, it had some excellent chapters and some real clunkers. Perhaps this is the greatest criticism of all. With such rich soil, the harvest was not nearly as rich as it could have been.
Also, if you are a fan of the show (and I would not recommend this book to someone who is not) you will quickly note that the books is not current. It was published too soon, first going to press in 2008. There is so much that has happened since then. They do not deal with John Lock going... Well, I had better not share that. Neither do they deal with Jacob and... Maybe that is something I had better not discuss either. In any event, there is so much that has happened as well as about to happen that it might have been better to wait for the conclusion of the show.
Despite these shortcomings, if you are a fan of LOST I would recommend this book.
Ral
If you've ever suspected that LOST had something to do w/ philosophy but never knew quite how to put it into words, this book is for you. This book has different essays on many of the various themes of the TV show: good vs. evil; fate vs. free will; faith vs. reason; etc. It takes the viewer all the way through Season 3, so if you haven't seen the whole season's worth of episodes, prepare yourself for some spoilers. But, if you're looking for a discussion on Locke's and Jack's differing approaches to how they deal w/ their fathers (just one example of an essay), check out this book.

I'm currently using some of the articles in here in a philosophy class and using select episodes to illustrate the Big Questions that we're all trying to answer.
Abuseyourdna
good book

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