» » Is Data Human?: The Metaphysics Of Star Trek

Download Is Data Human?: The Metaphysics Of Star Trek fb2

by Rick Hanley

  • ISBN: 0465045480
  • Category: Humor
  • Author: Rick Hanley
  • Subcategory: Television
  • Other formats: azw mbr doc txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books; Reprint edition (April 11, 1998)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • FB2 size: 1333 kb
  • EPUB size: 1363 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 793
Download Is Data Human?: The Metaphysics Of Star Trek fb2

He has taught various Star Trek courses, including A Star Trek Introduction to Philosophy and Philosophy of the Mind  . The idea is interesting, but Hanley spends too much time on basic philosophy and too little on the relationship of Star Trek and its philosophy

He has taught various Star Trek courses, including A Star Trek Introduction to Philosophy and Philosophy of the Mind using Star Trek episodes as examples. The idea is interesting, but Hanley spends too much time on basic philosophy and too little on the relationship of Star Trek and its philosophy. However I am sure a few undergraduates would be comfortably induced into an introductory class with this title. If you really want to read the book, read it out loud as though it were being presented as a series of lectures. It is much easier to follow.

While Star Trek is usually related to the technology aspects of life and what we'd able to achieve in the future. It's a franchise so diverse and with scripts for episodes so vast that they also approach the metaphysics aspects of life. Data, he is android, so is he alive or not?

While Star Trek is usually related to the technology aspects of life and what we'd able to achieve in the future. Data, he is android, so is he alive or not?

Rick Hanley, Richard Hanley. Place of Publication. Richard Hanley is an assistant professor of philosophy at Central Michigan University.

The Metaphysics Of Star Trek by Hanley, Richard Paperback Book -Is Data Human?: The Metaphysics Of Star Trek by Hanley, Richard Paperback Book. Rick Hanley, Richard Hanley. He has taught various Star Trek courses, including A Star Trek Introduction to Philosophy and Philosophy of the Mind using Star Trek episodes as examples. Country of Publication.

Professor Richard Hanley faced the dilemma plaguing so many philosophy professors today-how to entice students into the classroom. Based upon his own successful course, Is Data Human presents a thoroughly unique and enjoyable way of introducing students to the basic concepts of philosophy as seen through the lens of Star Trek.

Real World article(written from a Production point of view). The Metaphysics of Star Trek.

The Metaphysics of Star Trek . While the title of the book was changed to Is Data Human? The Metaphysics of Star Trek for the paperback version, the original hardcover version of the same book was simply entitled, The Metaphysics of Star Trek. The Star Wars films continue to revolutionize science fiction, creating new standards for cinematographic excellence, and permeating popular culture around the world. The films feature many complex themes ranging from good versus evil and moral developmen.

Uses the Star Trek series to explore various philosophical ideas and theories, including the extent of free will, the . Outras edições - Visualizar todos. Is Data human?: the metaphysics of Star Trek Richard Hanley Visualização de trechos - 1998

Uses the Star Trek series to explore various philosophical ideas and theories, including the extent of free will, the proper treatment of nonhumans, the nature of personal survival, and the nature of a person. O que estão dizendo - Escrever uma resenha. Comentário do usuário - Kirkus. Is Data human?: the metaphysics of Star Trek Richard Hanley Visualização de trechos - 1998. Is Data Human?: The Metaphysics Of Star Trek Rick Hanley Não há visualização disponível - 1998. Termos e frases comuns.

Is Data Human? The Metaphysics of Star Trek. Published 1998 by Basic Books in New York. Metaphysics, Star Trek IV: the voyage home (film), Star Trek television programs, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (television programme), Star Trek: Voyager (television programme), Star Trek: the Next Generation (television programme), Star trek (Television program), Protected DAISY, In library, Star Trek (Television program), Star Trek films.

The book focuses on applied metaphysics rather than pure metaphysics .

The book focuses on applied metaphysics rather than pure metaphysics, as the author notes in the introduction; thus, metaphysical topics are explored insofar as they touch upon people's everyday lives. The book is divided into two sections, each of which is again subdivided into three. I wanted to see sound, interesting arguments intended to convince the reader that Data is a person; instead, it is asserted that such arguments are not necessary, for reasons which I do not find compelling.

Professor Richard Hanley faced the dilemma plaguing so many philosophy professors today—how to entice students into the classroom. Based upon his own successful course, Is Data Human presents a thoroughly unique and enjoyable way of introducing students to the basic concepts of philosophy as seen through the lens of Star Trek. From the nature of a person, of minds, and of consciousness, to ethics and morality, to the nature and extent of knowledge and free will, Hanley brings a fresh perspective to the contemporary debates concerning humankind's place in the world.Dare to boldly go where no philosophy professor has gone before—a classroom packed with eager and enthusiastic students.
Reviews about Is Data Human?: The Metaphysics Of Star Trek (7):
Clever
I am a student of philosophy and rhetoric and have spent many hours of my life buried in complicated and dense reading. But this book just takes the cake!

It is not complicated. It is not dense. It is just boring.

The idea is interesting, but Hanley spends too much time on basic philosophy and too little on the relationship of Star Trek and its philosophy. However I am sure a few undergraduates would be comfortably induced into an introductory class with this title.

If you really want to read the book, read it out loud as though it were being presented as a series of lectures. It is much easier to follow.
Rgia
Only read part of it for a philosophy course but "It was pretty cool".
Malarad
Hanley's book is an interesting and informative read if somewhat technical.
Flas
I decided to read this book after finishing Lawrence Krauss' The Physics of Star Trek and was surprised to learn that there's a whole lot more controversial stuff going on in Star Trek than just the technological aspects. Krauss' brings up some interesting philosophical viewpoints. I was hoping he would give a little more of his opinion in the book, he stayed mostly neutral throughout his arguments, but I guess that lets us draw our own conclusions. The book gets a little slow and difficult to read a times but I think it is worth reading if you're a Star Trek fan and ever thought about the possibility of an artificial intelligence like Data.
Malodor
If you're interested in Star Trek _and_ philosophy then this is the book for you! However if you like Star Trek but aren't too fussed about philosophy then you might want to give this one a miss.
I found the first half of this book, discussing what constitutes intelligence and what is "a person", fairly boring. Things picked up a bit when the author moved on to transporters and time travel, but I've got to question some of the authors technical knowledge. He may know lots about philosophy but his physics is a bit shaky at times.
Of course philosophy being such a "hairy-fairy" science (some people don't even class it as a "real" science) it's very hard to argue with the authors conclusions. It's not like you can _prove_ anything, is it?
A much better read are Lawrence Krauss' books "The Physics of Star Trek" and "Beyond Star Trek".
Marilace
First of all, I agree with Murray Moffat that the first part of this book, which dicusses the criteria of personhood (a moral concept) is boring. This is because it is too loosely written. Hanley's discussion seems unfocused; sometimes one paragraph does not seem to follow from another. I still have not figured out what precisely the author concludes about organisms that display linguistic behavior, for instance. His comments on this issue are scattered, and, I believe, are never satisfactorily brought together. Chapters 4 and 5 of Part II constitute by far the best part of the work. In these chapters, Hanley discusses personal identity over time, i.e. synchronic identity, in opposition to diachronic identity, or identity at an instant, discussed in the first part. The first part of the book asks, "How can we identify a person?" and the first two chapters of the second part ask, "How can we identify the SAME person at two different times?" Hanley makes a compelling case (though, ultimately, I cannot agree) in the second part that continuity of psychology or pscychological states must be our guide in determining who is the same person as whom. The final chapter, chapter 6, seems somewhat disconnected from the rest of the book in discussing time travel, though this topic obviously fits with the general theme of the book. It is a satisfying discussion, though not as lively as that in the preceding two chapters. The epilogue seems preachy and entirely out of place, but only comprises a few pages. So, the rating for this book breaks down as follows:
Part I (chapters 1-3): 3 stars
Chapters 4 and 5: 5 stars
Chapter 6: 4 stars
Epilogue: 1 star
Averaging, but discounting the epilogue (since it is so short), we arrive at the rating of 4 stars for the book overall.

Related to Is Data Human?: The Metaphysics Of Star Trek fb2 books: