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by Kenneth J. Collins

  • ISBN: 0801027446
  • Category: History
  • Author: Kenneth J. Collins
  • Subcategory: World
  • Other formats: lrf doc txt mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Baker Academic (March 1, 2005)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • FB2 size: 1313 kb
  • EPUB size: 1104 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 190
Download The Evangelical Moment: The Promise of an American Religion fb2

The Evangelical Moment book. But who are today's evangelicals? Kenneth J. Collins shows that the evangelical movement has never been a front for one particular Christian denomination.

The Evangelical Moment book. Rather, it is a broad movement that encompasses those of many Christian traditions, from Methodists to Presbyterians to Baptists. Over the past twenty-five years, the term evangelical has become almost a household word. But who are today's evangelicals?

The author explains that this book is principally about understanding American evangelicalism and exploring the promise that it holds for American religion.

Collins, professor of historical theology and Wesley studies at Asbury Theological Seminary, has written an excellent work on American evangelicalism. Particularly helpful is his inclusion of Wesleyan and other voices that are sometimes overlooked in discussions of the evangelical ethos. The author explains that this book is principally about understanding American evangelicalism and exploring the promise that it holds for American religion.

Kenneth J. Collins shows that th. .Offers a new interpretation of the evangelical story and articulates an ecumenical vision for evangelism. ISBN13:9780801027444. Release Date:March 2005. Collins was born in New York City and was raised in an Irish Catholic family. The Evangelical Moment: The Promise of an American Religion Mar 01, 2005. His grandfather, Lawrence Collins, emigrated from Kilrush, County Claire at the beginning of the twentieth century. After living as a practical atheist throughout much of his college years, he had a life-transforming conversion experience upon reading the writings of John Wesley, eighteenth century British leader and founder of Methodism. He is Professor of Historical Theology and Wesley Studies at Asbury Theological Seminary. by Kenneth J. Collins.

The Promise of American Life is a book published by Herbert Croly, founder of The New Republic, in 1909. This book opposed aggressive unionization and supported economic planning to raise general quality of life. By Croly's death in 1930, only 7,500 copies of The Promise of American Life had been sold. Despite this, the book was immensely influential, even influencing Theodore Roosevelt to adopt the platform of The New Nationalism after reading it.

Book Publishing WeChat. One would expect that gender ideology as an identity boundary marker would have little to no effect on the actual gendered behavior of evangelicals. Collins, K. J. (2005). The Evangelical moment: The promise of an American religion. has been cited by the following article: TITLE: The Sexual Division of Household Labor. The evidence from this study supports this notion in that three gender ideology scales constructed of attitudinal items were utilized, with limited success, to understand their impact on the actual performance of household labors.

Turnabout is fair play and Kenneth J. Collins, a professor of theology at Asbury Theological Seminary, has now brought out The Evangelical Moment: The Promise of an American Religion (Baker, 288 p. Collins, a professor of theology at Asbury Theological Seminary, has now brought out The Evangelical Moment: The Promise of an American Religion (Baker, 288 pages

Turnabout is fair play and Kenneth J. Collins, a professor of theology at Asbury Theological Seminary, has now brought out The Evangelical Moment: The Promise of an American Religion (Baker, 288 pages,). It is in many ways a useful book, especially in its description of the various forms of evangelical Protestantism: historical evangelicalism, reformational evangelicalism, Puritan and pietistic evangelicalism, awakening evangelicalism, revivalistic evangelicalism, charismatic evangelicalism, and angelicalism.

Collins, Kenneth J. Dunaway, John Marsdon. ed. Gladly Learn, Gladly Teach: Living Out One’s Calling in the Twenty-First Century Academy. Leonard, Bill J. Baptists in America. Columbia Contemporary American Religion Series. Neufeld, Thomas R. Yoder. Collins tells the narrative history of the political and cultural . Collins tells the narrative history of the political and cultural fortunes. He traces the establishment of the evangelical enterprise in American culture and its influences on the political and social values of the American landscape throughout the twentieth century, as well as its fragmentation into competing ideological camps.

Over the past twenty-five years, the term evangelical has become almost a household word. But who are today's evangelicals? Kenneth J. Collins shows that the evangelical movement has never been a front for one particular Christian denomination. Rather, it is a broad movement that encompasses those of many Christian traditions, from Methodists to Presbyterians to Baptists. Collins believes that evangelicals can and should welcome increased cooperation with Catholic and Orthodox Christians on matters of shared concern. However, he believes that evangelicals must first come to terms with an increasingly diverse American religious landscape and forgo dreams of creating a "Christian America." The Evangelical Moment is an important book for any Christian who believes that the future health of American Christianity depends on evangelicalism recovering its prophetic voice.
Reviews about The Evangelical Moment: The Promise of an American Religion (6):
Kulalbine
Collins' book the "Evangelical Moment" takes the reader on a historical journey of the evangelical movement with some exciting stops along the way. The book provides a reader-friendly discussion of American evangelicals in term of such hot buttons issues as politics, social action and feminism. I especially liked the argument for a leadership role of woman in the church; it is the best I've ever read. The chapter on politics, as Collins skewers some of the reigning shibboleths of the left (I found at times even humorous), is worth the price of the book itself.

The segments on conversion and being born again, so important to American evangelicals, were also challenging to say the least... Collins seems to have a keen sense that grace is liberating, that it sets the captives free--really free. I don't often hear that.

From what I can tell, the book is carefully researched, and the bibliography is extensive. It will chart my way for some future reading. The "Evangelical Moment", however, is a good place to begin. It is a must read for all Christians who would like to understand their evangelical brothers and sister a little better.
EXIBUZYW
good book
Felhann
I vacillated on whether to give this 4 stars or 5--when I first read through it, I recommended it to many, and got through it quickly. I have some minor objections, but he raises a more traditional perspective that, especially within the Methodist tradition (which receives special, though not exclusive, focus in the book) has become more and more neglected among more academic Wesleyans, though starting to make a comeback.

Collins challenges those who favor pushing evangelicalism, and Methodism in particular, more and more away from its distinctly evangelical roots. For example, he calls out Methodist academics who raise questions about fundamental points of Christian orthodoxy, and cites the Methodist Discipline to boldy suggest as that those in authority who do not accept standard doctrine should be kept from communion. Although this may lead to a kneejerk reaction by many, his argument for this is straightforward and fair--what does communion mean, if not an acceptance of the basic tenets of Christian orthodoxy? He also notes that many younger scholars have moved in a conservative direction (my own observations agree with this), because they have been astute enough to apply the hermeneutic of suspicion, or the critical method, back on these
approaches themselves!

It would be a mistake to see this as simply a conservative apologetic. His section on politics shows balance, and he remains aware of the central importance of the "social Gospel" to turn of the century Evangelicalism. He also defends women's ordination. I found his method here to be his main shortcoming, as he relies largely on experiential and anecdotal arguments, and doesn't address the more fundamental points of church tradition, apostolic succession, etc. that would be raised by traditional Catholic or Orthodox readers who would be otherwise sympathetic with his discussion. Speaking of which, he gives a fairly balanced discussion of Catholicism and Orthodoxy (important dialogue partners with Evangelcials these days), while standing once again for the distinctives of evangelicalism, without castigating these other traditions. Those who favor reading Wesley more in light of Anglo-Catholicism may find this to be more of "holiness" read on Methodism than a Wesleyan one, though Collins does give attention to sacramentology, etc. Once again, though, he doesn't address the strongest arguments these traditions make for their own distinctive views of works/grace, ecclesiology, etc. In that sense, he writes with a definite pro-Evangelical slant. In all, though, there is enough there to argue with, and plenty to agree with (if you are a fairminded reader), to make for a stimulating read.
Naa
The Evangelical Moment is an informative account of a complex and often misunderstood movement known as American evangelicalism. Kenneth Collins traces the roots of evangelicalism beyond its major identifying movements in America to events in the first-century Church. He engages the reader in the evangelical conversations that have defined its theological and sociological positions in a way that is easy to understand and easy to read. The image he presents of the intelligent, well-educated American evangelical is radically different from the ignorant bigot on the lunatic fringe most often portrayed by the media today. His chapter on "Evangelicals and Feminism" is a welcome ray of sunlight for any woman who has ever longed for scriptural community but felt her spirit 'bound and gagged' by oppressive teachings. As Collins points out, not all the problems for American evangelicalism have been solved, but the conversation is ongoing and his prognosis is good. This book is rich in information and inspiring in hope.
Kann
Kenneth Collins presents a thorough examination of American Evangelicalism in this book, and those with varying degrees of knowledge about Evangelicalism will find it extremely helpful. This is a very readable presentation of the history, challenges, strengths and weaknesses of a movement that encompasses Christians from all denominations. Timely and encouraging is the treatment of Feminism and Evangelicalism. Collins advocates the power of God working through women as well as men to minister for the Lord. He calls for a balanced handling of Scripture through the illumination of the Holy Spirit. He asks probing questions that seek for integrity to Scripture and to the Living Word, Jesus Christ. American Evangelicalism is not just a doctrine but also a way of life. This way of life, through the power of Jesus Christ's atonement, has the power to radically change lives. I am encouraged about the position of evangelicals and their ability to face the challenges of a culture that is swiftly growing more spiritual and less Christian as time goes on.

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