» » Evangelical vs. Liberal

Download Evangelical vs. Liberal fb2

by James K. Wellman

  • ISBN: 0195300114
  • Category: History
  • Author: James K. Wellman
  • Subcategory: World
  • Other formats: lit doc mbr docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (April 23, 2008)
  • Pages: 328 pages
  • FB2 size: 1535 kb
  • EPUB size: 1178 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 477
Download Evangelical vs. Liberal fb2

Evangelical vs. Liberal book. Wellman doesn't conceal his self-identity as a liberal Protestant, but he succeeds fairly well at letting his evangelical subjects express their views and appreciating the nuance therein.

Evangelical vs. Liberal Wellman, James K. Oxford Academ 9780195300123 : The cultural conflict that increasingly divides American . In this book, James Wellman examines this conflict as it is played out in the American Northwest. Oxford Academ 9780195300123 : The cultural conflict that increasingly divides American society is particularly evident within Protestant Christianity. Drawing on an in-depth study of twenty-four of the areas fastest growing evangelical churches and ten vital liberal Protestant congregations, Wellman captures the leading trends of each group and their interaction with the wider American culture. Liberal. James K. Wellman, Jr. Description. The cultural conflict that increasingly divides American society is particularly evident within Protestant Christianity. Liberals and evangelicals clash in bitter competition for the future of their respective subcultures.

In this book, James Wellman examines this conflict as it is played out in the American Northwest. ISBN13:9780195300123. The Clash of Christian Cultures in the Pacific Northwest. Author: James Wellman. Where evangelicals are willing to draw sharp lines on gay marriage and abortion, liberals complain about evangelical self-righteousness and disregard for personal freedoms. Liberals prefer the moral power of inclusiveness, while evangelicals frame their moral stances as part of a metaphysical struggle between good and evil. Liberals view both policies with varying degrees of apprehension. Where evangelicals are willing to draw sharp lines on gay marriage and abortion, liberals complain about evangelical self-righteousness and disregard for personal freedoms

In this book, James Wellman examines this conflict as it is played out in the American Northwest. Drawing on an in-depth study of twenty-four of the area's fastest-growing evangelical churches and ten vital liberal Protestant congregations, Wellman captures the leading trends of each group and their interaction with the wider American culture.

James Wellman Jr. is professor and Chair of the Comparative religion Program at Jackson School of International Studies. I am very impressed by Mr. Bell, his theology, his willingness to embrace questions, and his respect for all of the Scriptures.

Literature, Journalism and Liberal Culture, 1886-1916. He finds a remarkable depth of disagreement between the two groups on almost every front. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by Oxford University Press.

The cultural conflict that increasingly divides American society is particularly evident within Protestant Christianity. Liberals and evangelicals clash in bitter competition for the future of their respective subcultures. In this book, James Wellman examines this conflict as it is played out in the American Northwest. Drawing on an in-depth study of twenty-four of the area's fastest-growing evangelical churches and ten vital liberal Protestant congregations, Wellman captures the leading trends of each group and their interaction with the wider American culture. He finds a remarkable depth of disagreement between the two groups on almost every front. Where evangelicals are willing to draw sharp lines on gay marriage and abortion, liberals complain about evangelical self-righteousness and disregard for personal freedoms. Liberals prefer the moral power of inclusiveness, while evangelicals frame their moral stances as part of a metaphysical struggle between good and evil. The entrepreneurial nature of evangelicalism translates into support of laissez-faire capitalism and democratic political advocacy. Liberals view both policies with varying degrees of apprehension. Such differences are significant on a national scale, with implications for the future of American Protestantism in particular and American culture in general. Both groups act in good faith and with good intentions, and each maintains a moral core that furthers its own identity, ideology, ritual, mission, and politics. In some situations, they share similar attitudes despite having different beliefs. Attending church services and interviewing senior pastors, lay leaders and new members, Wellman is able to provide new insights into the convenient categories of "liberal" and "evangelical," the nature of the conflict, and the myriad ways both groups affect and are affected by American culture.
Reviews about Evangelical vs. Liberal (7):
Saimath
I agree with other reviewers that Wellman's work is helpful in a sociology of religion or Pacific Northwest Studies context. I will focus on applications for Christian ministry. Christian ministry has been slow to embrace sociology and the social sciences in general, but I believe the insights are at least helpful, often crucial. Wellman makes sociological information on the Pacific Northwest context accessible to both clergy and congregational/ministry leaders. It may be a little long for a group book study, but if you have a group of leaders eager to learn and reflect, go for it.

I look at this research as a "Liberal" pastor from Wellman's definitions in the book, it should be noted that the defining terms "Liberal" and "Evangelical" do not necessarily mesh with understandings from public discourse, and should not prevent readers from engaging the text because of their views on this dichotomy. Wellman's definitions carry more complexity than given credit in public discourse. "Liberal" churches probably match more with "Mainline," and "Evangelical" matches more with what are often known as "non-denominational." Wellman has reasons for his definitions; the nomenclature is clarified and shouldn't be a barrier in engaging the research.

The primary reason I believe this is a good book for Christian ministry is it allows leaders to reflect upon their personal, congregational, and contextual beliefs in a way that can be applied to the mission of a particular congregation or ministry. Too often, people involved in ministry operate under assumed belief systems, and Wellman's comparative case study approach inspires reflection. There is a moment of discovery because this book isn't a debate about the merits of particular belief systems, but comparative research (though their is some analysis from Wellman at the end of the book). Speaking from my perspective as a Mainline pastor, what was particularly helpful regarding the research of belief system approaches to the Pacific Northwest context, relates to approaches toward a relatively low religious affiliation rate for the region. A significant difference between Liberals and Evangelicals is the attitude toward the region in relation to their respective ministries. Evangelicals tended to see endless opportunity in the open religious landscape, where as Liberal clergy and congregation members tended to bristle at what the society doesn't provide for their religious communities. The book ended up inspiring a sermon series for me about the dangers of entitlement in spiritual and religious leadership, which happens to be a significant conflict with Jesus and the religious leaders of his day. Regardless of where you are on the belief system spectrum, the research provides a cautionary tale about the dangers of entitlement in faith communities and ministries, and it isn't mere conjecture; it's backed by solid sociological research.
Granirad
I first encountered this book at the Washington State Library and ordered a copy to give to a discussion leader at my (mainstream) church. It was a serious disappointment, therefore, to have the copy from Amazon arrive with a damaged cover and first few pages.
As for the text, the material presented is a good analysis of the dichotomy between Evangelical and Liberal churches in the Pacific Northwest. It appears to be unbiased; and I don't think either faction could find fault with the way its views are presented.
Two matters disappointed me:
(1) Dr. Wellman refers repeatedly to the fact that church participation in this area is the lowest in the country. It would have been helpful if he had explored this more and used it to emphasize that it contributes to the apparent split--or that the split contributes to it, as the case may be.
(2) It was not an easy book to read. Dr. Wellman uses nouns as verbs again and again, making it necessary to re-read many sentences for comprehension.
On the other hand, I have heard Dr. Wellman in the role of moderator at a public forum between Evangelical and Liberal presenters. He did a very fine job, especially in tying the phenomenon to the presidential election campaign which was then in progress.
FRAY
This is a really good book that gives a very balanced picture of Liberal and Evangelical Protestantism that shows no bias, but lets the views speak for themselves and categorizes, compares, and interprets them in scholarly, theoretical, and practical terms.
Adoranin
The conflict between fundamentalism and modernism is playing out in every major religion. Dr. Wellman has chosen to compare and contrast evangelical and progressive Protestants, living in the Pacific Northwest, as a case study. For those who wonder about the future of religion in an increasingly secular world, the book raises provocative and intriguing questions.
HelloBoB:D
This is a valuable study of the contrasting churches in the Pacific Northwest. The fact that the author is a PCUSA church minister and yet finds plenty to fault with the liberal churches makes it more objective. Another confirmation of why conservative churches continue to grow and liberal ones aren't.
Yalone
The book describes the attitudes of liberal Protestant congregations in the Pacific Northwest, thoughI have seen those expressed elsewhere in America. I am not from that region, I gained a better understanding of the United Methodist churches I attended growing up that never told me why I needed to be born again.
I cited quotes from this book for a term paper I was writing.
Kearanny
Jim Wellman has done a great favor to all (Liberals, Evangelicals & others)
who are serious about understanding the make-up of the Pacific Northwest
churchscape. He starts by sharing a bit of his own story and openly
declaring his biases. Both actions make it comfortable to "ride on his bus"
thru the PNW understanding better with what lenses he will viewing the
churchscape. Along the way he very honestly lets each tell their story but
then adds his own professional insight that deepens the journey. He is
honest and insightful in his analysis and careful in his criticisms. His
compare/contrast methodology can seem to be as engendering conflict, but in
reality it allows a deeper understanding of Liberals, Evangelicals and the
Northwest generally. He goes way beyond describing the "what" and tries to
decode and make coherent some of the "whys" of our churchscape. In doing
so, he also shows where each group is fits well in the Northwest and where
the tension points lie in that fit. For anyone serious about church
planting or church revitalization, Wellman's diagram on p.28 is worth the price of the book. It will
both help plot the micro make-up of NW communities and help churches
understand how and where they easily fit.

Related to Evangelical vs. Liberal fb2 books: