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by P. H. Sawyer

  • ISBN: 0416741800
  • Category: History
  • Author: P. H. Sawyer
  • Subcategory: World
  • Other formats: mobi mbr rtf doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Methuen young books; First Edition edition (November 1982)
  • Pages: 200 pages
  • FB2 size: 1919 kb
  • EPUB size: 1549 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 812
Download Kings and Vikings: Scandinavia and Europe, A.D.700-1100 fb2

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Professor Sawyer offers some new interpretations of the development of Scandinavian society and history of. .

Professor Sawyer offers some new interpretations of the development of Scandinavian society and history of the Christian conversion. P. H. Sawyer doesn't so much answer these questions in 1982's "Kings And Vikings" as make clear what we know versus what some have theorized, rather liberally, it seems, in Dr. Sawyer's view. This may engage those who have studied Vikings already but will confuse and distance those reading this as their doorway into the Viking world.

Kings and Vikings book. Start by marking Kings and Vikings: Scandinavia and Europe, . 700-1100 as Want to Read

Kings and Vikings book. 700-1100 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Peter H. Sawyer.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Professor Sawyer offers some new interpretations of the development of Scandinavian society and history of the Christian conversion.

Home Browse Books Book details, Kings and Vikings: Scandinavia and Europe, . Many books on the Vikings have been published recently and some apology or explanation ought perhaps to be offered for adding to their number

Home Browse Books Book details, Kings and Vikings: Scandinavia and Europe, . Kings and Vikings: Scandinavia and Europe, . Many books on the Vikings have been published recently and some apology or explanation ought perhaps to be offered for adding to their number. This book is, in effect, a sequel to my Age of the Vikings, first published in 1962. That title was somewhat misleading for it was not a general study of the Vikings but rather an attempt to question some of the assumptions made about them. Contemporary sources. Scandinavian society 5 Scandinavia and Europe before 900. an introductory outline. The Baltic and beyond.

16 plates Peter H. Sawyer published his book Kings and Vikings: Scandinavia and Europe AD 700 . Sawyer uses the term ‘Scandinavia’ as a mere geographic label that covers the Scandinavian Peninsula, Jutland and the Danish archipelago. Sawyer published his book Kings and Vikings: Scandinavia and Europe AD 700- 1100 in 1982 as the intended sequel of his earlier work Age of Vikings (London, 1962). He writes in the ‘Preface’: ‘It was, however, my ambition to write a general survey and this seems a good time to attempt such a work of synthesis. 1 In his endeavour to do so he chose a strictly evidence- based approach to his subject. The Age of the Vikings: an introductory outline.

Food and Eating in Medieval Europe. Nations and States in Southeast Europe. Henry Staten Wittgenstein and Derrida 1984. This book examines Aristotle, Kant, and especially Husserl to bring to light Derrida's development of the classical philosophical concepts of form (eidos), verbal formula (logos), the objec. ull description. Money and Its Use in Medieval Europe. Scholarly volume on the uses on the uses, forms and changes in value of money in Europe.

Kings and Vikings. This 182-page hardcover was published in 1982 by Methuen & Co. LTD, London (1st edition).
Reviews about Kings and Vikings: Scandinavia and Europe, A.D.700-1100 (7):
JoJogar
I was like many people when I first learned about Vikings, horned helmets, axes, raiders and so on. My proff taught me otherwise, she made us read this book. Sawyer is one of the great historians of the Viking age. In his book he is able to show not only that Vikings were both raider and traders, sometimes in the same year but also their influence throughout Europe, from Spain to Russia. He talks about where they were, what they did and how they were organized. Of course he takes great pleasure in debunking myths about Vikings! It is an easy read, well worth it. Great for beginners in the European “Dark Ages” history.
Ucantia
KINDLE VERSION UNREADABLE. Tried to get a refund, was told they would look into but never got credited. Don't waste your money.
Dibei
OK
Dilkree
This is a somewhat brief overview of a four century long Viking period, starting with groups that were like tribal mauraders gathering loot, and progressing through periods of colonization and eventually established national governments. It was not that far back that Sweden was a msjor power in Europe, controlling an area much larger than present day Sweden. The Danes briefly controlled England and Ireland before being driven out. Rollo established a much more enduring kingdom in Normandy. Many of us alive today are descended from various intermarriages.

The author tries to separate fact from myth, a major endeavor. Storytellers writing sagas tended to use a great deal of literary license. There are undoubtedly true facts behind stories like Beowulf, but it requires some interpretation to separate the facts from fiction. One can wonder about the legendary Sigurd, slayer of the dragon Favne. Much of what we know comes from the so-called Icelandic Sagas.

The author does provide a good general picture of the period. Three was established trade in commodities ranging from fur and amnber to slaves (yes, original slaves were white). There was an established social order of freemen, freed slaves, and slaves. The author mentions the practice of weregild, i.e., the payment of money to the family of someone whom you killed - a practice that still exists between tribes in Afghanistan.

Overall, it is a good book to read if you have an interest in the society of the Viking period.
Thundershaper
What were the Vikings, where were they from, and when was their age of dominance over northern Europe?

P. H. Sawyer doesn't so much answer these questions in 1982's "Kings And Vikings" as make clear what we know versus what some have theorized, rather liberally, it seems, in Dr. Sawyer's view. This may engage those who have studied Vikings already but will confuse and distance those reading this as their doorway into the Viking world.

The title of the book, along with a quote from St. Augustine's "City Of God," asking "what are kingdoms but fair thievish purchases?" suggests an effort to point to the Vikings' eventual legitimization, a byproduct of their conquests in Russia, France, and the British Isles. But after a brief, neat introduction that presents this idea, the book goes into Sawyer's real concern, which is separating cold hard fact from myth. There is much of the latter and very little of the former, in his view.

Sometimes, he points out, different Viking societies told the same story two different ways. An entertaining example he provides features a dispute between two rulers, Denmark's Sven Forkbeard and Norway's King Olaf. Danish sources present Olaf as the unprincipled aggressor; Norwegian sources present Olaf as pious and cheated out of his wife's land holdings by the scheming Sven.

So the famous sagas of the 11th and 12th centuries that tell of Viking life are dismissed as "dynastic propaganda" and suchlike told too far after the fact to serve as anything other than wishful historiography. Ancient runic inscriptions are likewise to be taken with grains of salt; they may not be as ancient as we think. Hoards of coins suggesting the Vikings may have had dealings with Islam can't tell us much; even dated coins can be misleading.

Sawyer also works to dispel some myths. He doesn't go after the more obvious ones, like the horned helmets and the use of enemy skulls as drinking vessels. He does question the notion of the "blood-eagle sacrifice" where victims had their lungs pulled out of their living bodies, rejected by Sawyer on the basis of other sources he doesn't describe in detail.

It's like that a lot in this short, oft-frustrating book; Sawyer presents ideas only to shoot them down, like an academic piñata party. When he does get to describing something in a straightforward manner, as with a chapter deep in this short book about the Viking raids in France, England, and Ireland, it is well-presented with the idea that Vikings were not pirates so much as happy-change agents who were as much influenced by as influencing what they encountered.

"It is, indeed, my hope that this book will stimulate discussions that will contribute to its own obsolescence," Sawyer writes in his Preface. That may be the best way to read the book, as a carefully-presented-if-dry marker on Viking studies circa the early 1980s rather than as an introduction to the Viking story itself.
Alsalar
So far I've found it difficult to finding interesting topical well written books for this period. This one isn't bad but it is still a tad dry. It is not a thrilling narrative non-fiction work. It doesn't bring shows like the Vikings to life. But some of its discussions are reasonable.
Vikus
Sawyer takes the position that most of what we think we know about Scandinavian history in the Viking age is from histories written centuries later, in the 1100s and 1200s, and therefore unreliable. He works from more primary material--archaeology, contemporary documents from continental Europe, hoard numismatics, place names, runestones, etc.--to come up with a more accurate history of Viking-age society at home, and relations with the rest of the world (raids, mostly).

My only real complaint is that it's too short. One could argue that Sawyer only has so much material that fits his criteria to work with, but I say that if you're starting from the position that "everything you know is wrong," you ought to have more to replace it with. So only four stars, not five.

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