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by Thomas Albert Howard

  • ISBN: 0199565511
  • Category: History
  • Author: Thomas Albert Howard
  • Subcategory: World
  • Other formats: lit lrf azw mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 15, 2011)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • FB2 size: 1759 kb
  • EPUB size: 1466 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 896
Download God and the Atlantic: America, Europe, and the Religious Divide fb2

Thomas Albert Howard, in his God and the Atlantic, surveys Europe's ideological, religious, and political conflict between the .

Thomas Albert Howard, in his God and the Atlantic, surveys Europe's ideological, religious, and political conflict between the proponents of the French Revolution, on the one hand, and the restorationists of "throne and altar" crowd, on the other, and pursuasively sees therein the origins of some strands of Europe's anti-Americanism. America's lack of a religious establishment was seen by the restorationists as indifference, if not hostility to religion, and something of a threat to their efforts in Europe.

Howard Thomas Albert (EN). Since the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, the United States and Western Europe's paths to modernity have diverged sharply with respect to religion. In short, Americans have maintained much friendlier ties with traditional forms of religion than their European counterparts.

God and the Atlantic book. I have been having great luck with my books recently. This is a learned discussion of the religious divide between Europe and America. It turns out the high levels of religiosity in America call out for an explanation. Oct 27, 2013 Dave Courtney rated it it was amazing.

God and the Atlantic: America, Europe, and the Religious Divide. Got it. We value your privacy.

Since the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, the United States and Western Europe's paths to modernity have diverged sharply with respect to religion.

Thomas Albert (Tal) Howard is a Professor of History and the Humanities at Valparaiso University, Indiana. He formerly directed the Center for Faith and Inquiry and was Professor of History at Gordon College in Wenham, Massachusetts

Thomas Albert (Tal) Howard is a Professor of History and the Humanities at Valparaiso University, Indiana. He formerly directed the Center for Faith and Inquiry and was Professor of History at Gordon College in Wenham, Massachusetts. He completed his MA (1992) and P.

Read "God and the Atlantic America, Europe, and the Religious Divide" . What explains this transatlantic religious divide?

While exploring in the first chapters 'Old World' disquiet toward the young republic's religious dynamics, the book turns in the final chapters and focuses on more constructive Europeanassessments of the United States.

Thomas Albert Howard, God and the Atlantic. America, Europe, and the Religious Divide. Oxford University Press, Oxford/New York, xii + pp. ISBN

Thomas Albert Howard, God and the Atlantic. ISBN. I very much enjoyed this well-written book which puts into an historical context the antipathy that many Europeans-notably the political class, significant numbers of journalists, and the educated public-feel towards America in general and towards American religion in particular.

Since the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, the United States and Western Europe's paths to modernity have diverged sharply with respect to religion. In short, Americans have maintained much friendlier ties with traditional forms of religion than their European counterparts. What explains this transatlantic religious divide? Accessing the topic though nineteenth and early twentieth-century European commentary on the United States, Thomas Albert Howard argues that an 'Atlantic gap' in religious matters has deep and complex historical roots, and enduringly informs some strands of European disapprobation of the United States. While exploring in the first chapters 'Old World' disquiet toward the young republic's religious dynamics, the book turns in the final chapters and focuses on more constructive European assessments of the United States. Acknowledging the importance of Alexis de Tocqueville for the topic, Howard argues that a widespread overreliance on Tocqueville as interpreter of America has had a tendency to overshadow other noteworthy European voices. Two underappreciated figures here receive due attention: the Protestant Swiss-German church historian, Philip Schaff, and the French Catholic philosopher, Jacques Maritain. While the transatlantic religious divide has received commentary from journalists and sociologists in recent decades, this is the first major work of cultural and intellectual history devoted to the subject.
Reviews about God and the Atlantic: America, Europe, and the Religious Divide (2):
Arar
This book is well worth your time and effort. Its basic thesis is that, when conservative, even reactionary attitudes for religion are winning the culture war, [in Europe, but derivatively in the USA), then arises a more radical liberal, even secular agnostic stance toward religion. On the other hand, when that agnostic secular attitude toward the Christian religion seemed to be in ascendance, then there always seemed to be a recovery for the believers. Often times, especially in the United States from the founding til WWII, the attitude of the state toward religion was what one might call 'positive neutrality,' never instituting a theocracy, which would violate the First Amenment, but recognizing that religion would help Americans be good, law-abiding citizens.

I would say this was true for most of the modern period, but the agnostic/secular state, led by the US Supreme Court since 1947, has been in ideological war against believers in all religions, but especially Christians, to the detriment of our culture, which upholds our secular state, a fact which all our Founders, including the Deists, believed in.

On p. 3, Howard states that it was the state-managed religions in Europe which led to throwing the religious baby out with the ancien regime bathwater, whereas there was no such regime in the US, although the Puritan regime in New England came close.

Howard locates the beginning of secularism (p. 13)at the French Revolution, but I think he undervalues the anti-religious, anti-clerical writings of the philosophes prior to the revolution.

As the first reviewer noted, the sections on Philip Schaff and Jacques Maritain are particularly worthwhile. On p. 94, Howard notes that at least the Catholic Restorationists taught that the Reformation led to the Enlightenment, which led to skepticism, which led to the French Revolution, which led to our current North Atlantic secularist culture.

On p. 180 and ff, Howard seems to believe that in the founding documents of the USA, are more congruent with the traditional Western culture, than the pseudo-culture arising from the enlightenment and symbolized in the vicious French Revolution. I wish Howard were right, but as a conservative believer, I fear the opposite is true, or at least is winning the Kulturkampf.
Wat!?
What's behind the scorn Europeans often have for the United States?

Thomas Albert Howard, in his God and the Atlantic, surveys Europe's ideological, religious, and political conflict between the proponents of the French Revolution, on the one hand, and the restorationists of "throne and altar" crowd, on the other, and pursuasively sees therein the origins of some strands of Europe's anti-Americanism.

America's lack of a religious establishment was seen by the restorationists as indifference, if not hostility to religion, and something of a threat to their efforts in Europe. However, America's religiosity, even though lacking a religious establishment, was seen by leftist ideologues of the French Revolution as a threat to their program to undermine religion. America could not win for losing.

There were occasional Europeans, however, who did developed a more constructive view of America and Howard highlights two of them: Philip Schaff and Jacques Maritain, both religious -- one Protestant, the other Catholic. His accounts of their intellectual journeys are fascinating.

This is one of those unforgetable books. It's a gem.

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