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by Bruce Cumings

  • ISBN: 0691101132
  • Category: History
  • Author: Bruce Cumings
  • Subcategory: Military
  • Other formats: rtf lrf azw doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; Limited Ed edition (October 21, 1981)
  • Pages: 608 pages
  • FB2 size: 1459 kb
  • EPUB size: 1245 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 261
Download Origins of the Korean War, Vol. 1: Liberation and the Emergence of Separate Regimes, 1945-1947 (Studies of the East Asian Institute) fb2

In Volume II of The Origins of the Korean War, Cumings examines the internal . WHY writes huuuuge books like this, and especially vo. ??

In Volume II of The Origins of the Korean War, Cumings examines the internal political-economic development of the two Korean states and the consequences, for Korea, of Cold War rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union. Mr. Cumings is chairman of the history department at the University of Chicago and the author of The Origins of the Korean War, a respected two-volume survey. ??

Bruce Cumings, in his two-volume work, The Origins of the Korean War, argues that the war was largely a result of. .Volume I deals with the first period of roughly 1945-1946, while Volume II considers the years 1947-1950.

Bruce Cumings, in his two-volume work, The Origins of the Korean War, argues that the war was largely a result of American misunderstandings of Korean politics, American occupational authorities' desire to confront Soviet-style Communism on the peninsula, the damaging legacy of the Japanese colonial era, and the tension in Washington over pursuing a policy of Containment or a policy of Rollback. Cumings challenged the notion that the Soviets and their North Korean allies bore primary.

East Asian Institute. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive. The origins of the Korean War : liberation and the emergence of separate regimes, 1945-1947. Princeton, . : Princeton University Press. and Columbia University. East Asian Institute. The origins of the Korean War : liberation and the emergence of separate regimes, 1945-1947, Bruce Cumings Princeton University Press Princeton, . 1981. Australian/Harvard Citation.

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The Description for this book, The Origins of the Korean War, Volume I: Liberation and the Emergence of Separate Regimes, 1945-1947, will be forthcoming.

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Bruce Cumings The Korean War in History (Studies on East Asia)

The Description for this book, The Origins of the Korean War, Volume I: Liberation and the Emergence of Separate Regimes, 1945-1947, will be forthcoming. Download The Origins of the Korean War, Volume I: Liberation and the Emergence of Separate Regimes, 1945-1947 (Studies of the East Asian Institute) by Bruce Cumings free. The Korean War in History (Studies on East Asia). Perspectives on Japan and Korea: 2nd Nordic Symposium on Japanese and Korea.

Roosevelt did not push: even at Yalta the end of the Pacific War seemed to be over a year away and other issues were more pressing.

tutelage" of the Philippines, see Bruce Cumings, The Origins of the Korean War, vol. 1, Liberation and the Emergence of Separate Regimes 1945-1947 (Princeton, . 4 The Journal of American-East Asian Relations remain weak and divided in the postwar period, rather than the emerg ing great power and "policeman" as Roosevelt had hoped, caused apprehensions about a power vacuum in northeast Asia that the So viet Union would fill. Roosevelt did not push: even at Yalta the end of the Pacific War seemed to be over a year away and other issues were more pressing. Yet Stalin had good reason not to reach hard-and-fast agreements on Korea.

See Cumings, Bruce, The Origins of the Korean War: Liberation and the Emergence of Separate Regimes, 1945–1947 (Princeton, 1981). 4. See Iriye, Akira, Power and Culture: The Japanese-American War (Cambridge, MA, 1981); Yergin, Daniel, Shattered Peace (Boston, 1977). 5. Bullock, Alan, Ernest Bevin: Foreign Secretary, 1945–1951 (London, 1983), p. 55. 6. Quoted in Ibid, p. 178. 7. The best example is Gaddis, John . The United States and the Origins of the Cold War, 1941–1947 (New York and London, 1972). Recommend this journal.

Socialism in One Zone: Stalin's Policy in Korea, 1945-1947 (Oxford, 1988).

Bruce Cumings, The Origins of the Korean War: Liberation and the Emergence of Separate Regimes, 1945-1947 (Princeton, . 2. Eric Van Ree, Socialism in One Zone: Stalin's Policy in Korea, 1945-1947 (Oxford, 1988). 3. These disclosures occurred at a conference on "The Role of the Soviet Union in the Korean War," held at Kyung Hee University in Seoul on 15 and 16 November 1991. Lowe to Truman, 11 September 1950, box 245, President's Secretary's File, Harry S. Truman Papers, Truman Library, Independence, Missouri.

The description for this book, The Origins of the Korean War, Volume I: Liberation and the Emergence of Separate Regimes, 1945-1947, will be forthcoming.


Reviews about Origins of the Korean War, Vol. 1: Liberation and the Emergence of Separate Regimes, 1945-1947 (Studies of the East Asian Institute) (7):
Vuzahn
It's been about 10 years since I first read Bruce Cumings' Origins of the Korean War. Ever since, I have felt guilty for not reviewing the book. I have read many history books in my 66 years and I can say, without hesitation, that Origins of the Korean War is my favourite history book. Here you will find a very deep analysis of Korean society, which is almost completely ignored by other authors. Cumings has a very rare quality for an American author: an ability and willingness to respect other perspectives and narratives. I confess that my simplistic understanding of the war, namely that it was started by an unprovoked attack by the Northern communists, was blown completely out of the water by Cumings' book. This book not only radically changed my opinion of Korea but also third-world nationalism in general. That is probably why Cumings' interpretation of the war has been suppressed by the establishment. For more on that, I highly recommend another Cumings book, War and Television, which describes his shameful treatment by PBS and Thames Television during the production of a Korean War documentary. If we wish to avoid a disastrous resolution of the Korean powder keg, we should treasure, not ignore, scholars such as Dr. Cumings.
Talrajas
One of the reasons why ALL people in the USA should read this volume (number I) is the detailed yet entertaining story the author tells. Cumings' scholarship is superb! In case ANYONE feels he is biased, he supports the views expressed by using U.S. Army or government records, notes by the significant actors, etc. Anyone that challenges assertions made in this volume will most likely have the disadvantage of having a very sparse record or evidence for their opinions. Volume number II is quite another thing, however. While Cumings marshals facts to support his views which are just as well founded as in volume number I, the second volume (number II) is chilling in its view of a fascist basis for U.S. policies, and obvious paranoia, such as that found in the China lobby, Japan lobby, and the Korea lobby. One would do well to recall Kissinger's difficulties with the China lobby while attempting to extract the U.S. from the disasterous defeat in Vietnam. A major achievement of volume number II is showing how the views of Americans, so limited culturally, have led to a tragedy in history, a tragedy for Koreans, Japanese, but especially Americans.
Ndyardin
Great book, very good conditions for the price.
Nirn
Bruce Cumings, in his two-volume work, The Origins of the Korean War, argues that the war was largely a result of American misunderstandings of Korean politics, American occupational authorities' desire to confront Soviet-style Communism on the peninsula, the damaging legacy of the Japanese colonial era, and the tension in Washington over pursuing a policy of Containment or a policy of Rollback. Volume I deals with the first period of roughly 1945-1946, while Volume II considers the years 1947-1950.

Cumings challenged the notion that the Soviets and their North Korean allies bore primary responsibility for starting the war. This places him at odds with historians such as David Rees and Adam Ulam. Cumings wrote that the origins of the war were much more complicated and multifaceted that the simplistic argument that the Communists started it, however satisfying that must be to American sensibilities. It was American policies, shaped on the Korean peninsula and in Washington, Cumings noted, that must be carefully considered in any discussion of the origins of the Korean War.

Cumings considered the role of General John Reed Hodge, the military governor of South Korea in the years following World War II. Hodge had little understanding of the Korean people or their indigenous political systems, and even wrote to his superiors that the Koreans were “largely incapable of intelligence political action (Vol. I, 212).” This became an important factor when the South Koreans began to organize themselves into various committees to run their local affairs. Hodge and other American authorities mistakenly interpreted these committees as potentially revolutionary movements, and sought to stamp them out. In fact, Korean discontent with the American attempts to Americanize Korea in part led to the creation of the committees. Japan had left considerable infrastructure in the peninsula, and American attempts to introduce free markets and American-style capitalism in order to keep Communism at bay often backfired and resulted in a kind of new feudal Korean society. Despite the fact that the committees were very popular among the Koreans, “the Americans consciously and systematically rooted out this movement because it could not be counted upon to serve American interests (Vol. I, 350).”

The result of American actions led to the Autumn Harvest Uprising in late 1946, in which strikes, protests, and property damage led to massive arrests. Cumings juxtaposes this with events in the Soviet-controlled north, where the Soviets and the Communist Koreans “could reflect on the first year of liberation with considerable satisfaction (Vol. I, 426).” While the Americans attempted to impose Containment in their sphere of occupation even before it became Washington's official policy, the Soviets had created a government and system that appeared to be much more responsive to the needs of the Korean people.

Cumings presents the North Koreans as eager not only to cast off the Americans from the peninsula but also their own Soviet masters, but the focus of the work deals primarily with American policymakers. For Washington in 1947, the local American policy of Containment in Korea meshed well with the hard line that was being taken against Communism in Greece and Turkey. At the same time, Cumings noted a Rollback strategy emerged, championed initially by American expansionists like John Foster Dulles, in which many policy makers saw an opportunity to clear the peninsula of Communism once and for all. The question over Containment and Rollback was central to the debates in Washington, but ultimately Containment won out as the preferred strategy as the risk of general war breaking out over peripheral adventures was deemed too great. Still, though the Korean War in many ways stabilized the power blocks in Asia, certain regions of the Third World remained “an intermediate zone where superpower conflict could ensue without threatening global war (Vol. II, 765).”

Walter LaFeber wrote in The Journal of American History that Cumings “offers dramatic new insights into U.S. policy during the early Cold War.” Tae Jin Kahng offered in The International History Review, that the work was an “enormous intellectual achievement,” though felt the treatment of some of the American actors was too monolithic.1

Cumings work presents considerable food for thought. The role of American occupation policies is essential to understand the political realities in the peninsula in the years immediately after World War II. Cumings makes a convincing argument that American policy makers in Korea were largely deaf to the Korean people, and created a government that was corrupt and unresponsive to Korean needs. Cumings second volume, however, is less persuasive. It correctly presents the conflict largely as a civil war, rather than exclusively an engagement of the Cold War. Still, the portrait he paints of figures like George Kennan, Averell Harriman, Hodge, and others as being all die-hard nationalists is indeed monolithic, as Kahng notes. Still, the biggest problem with this work is the lack of Soviet agency in these events. If Cumings has been able to consider the Soviet side of events with the same scrutiny with which he examined decision makers in Washington, the work would be all the richer for it.

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