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by Richard Rhodes

  • ISBN: 0684824140
  • Category: History
  • Author: Richard Rhodes
  • Subcategory: Military
  • Other formats: lit azw mobi txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (August 6, 1996)
  • Pages: 736 pages
  • FB2 size: 1867 kb
  • EPUB size: 1118 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 535
Download Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb fb2

But while I feel that Richard Rhodes' other book The Making of the Atomic Bomb to be one of the most enjoyable books I've ever read, I felt that Dark Sun got bogged down with massive amounts of information about Russian spies.

But while I feel that Richard Rhodes' other book The Making of the Atomic Bomb to be one of the most enjoyable books I've ever read, I felt that Dark Sun got bogged down with massive amounts of information about Russian spies. I do like spy novels and to a certain degree I enjoyed reading about all the spies that gathered information about our nuclear bomb development.

Books by richard rhodes. The Making of the Atomic Bomb. The author is grateful for permission to reprint the following: Arthur Lawrence Norberg interviews with Norris Bradbury, Darol Froman, John Manley, J. Carson Mark and Raemer Schreiber quoted by permission of The Bancroft Library. Excerpts from The Journals of David E. Lilienthal, Vol. 2: The Atomic Energy Years, 1945–1950 by David E. Lilienthal.

Author Richard Rhodes won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award for his previous atomic tome, The Making of the Atomic Bomb.

Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture.

Dark Sun: The Making Of The Hydrogen Bomb. Author: Richard Rhodes. Here, for the first time, in a brilliant, panoramic portrait by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Making of the Atomic Bomb, is the definitive, often shocking story of the politics and the science behind the development of the hydrogen bomb and the birth of the Cold War. Based on secret files in the United States and the former Soviet Union, this monumental work of history discloses how and why the United States decided to create the bomb that would dominate world politics for more than forty years.

Электронная книга "Dark Sun: The Making Of The Hydrogen Bomb", Richard Rhodes. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Dark Sun: The Making Of The Hydrogen Bomb" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Mr. Rhodes has done a beautiful job, and I don’t see how anyone can ever top it. -LUIS W. ALVAREZ, Nobel Laureate for Physics, 1968.

Taken as a story of human achievement, and human blindness, the discoveries in the sciences are among the great epics. Mr.

Richard Rhodes is the author of numerous books and the winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award

Richard Rhodes is the author of numerous books and the winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award. He graduated from Yale University and has received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Книга жанра: Документальное, Документальное: Прочее. Читать онлайн в библиотеке Booksonline. than half those deaths; with them, in Germany and the Soviet Union both, had followed general ruination. In the end, out in the Pacific, two planes carrying two bombs had compelled the war's termination. The two atomic bombs, ferocious as minor suns, had given an emperor descended from a god reason to surrender. It was hard to imagine that there might ever be another

Dark Sun Pt. 1 : The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 13 years ago. Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb is a fascinating historical work that reads almost like a novel; perhaps a particularly technical Clancy novel, but a novel nevertheless.

Dark Sun Pt. It targets a general audience and balances the consequent need for clarity with depth and technical detail, and with great success. Rhodes starts by taking us through America's Manhattan Project, a subject he dealt with in depth in his earlier book, The Making of the Atomic Bomb.

Here, for the first time, in a brilliant, panoramic portrait by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Making of the Atomic Bomb, is the definitive, often shocking story of the politics and the science behind the development of the hydrogen bomb and the birth of the Cold War.Based on secret files in the United States and the former Soviet Union, this monumental work of history discloses how and why the United States decided to create the bomb that would dominate world politics for more than forty years.
Reviews about Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb (7):
Tto
I first read this book back in 2005, immediately after reading The Making of the Atomic Bomb (referred to as TMOTAB from here on) for the third time. My initial feeling was that it suffered in comparison with its monumental predecessor, and proved once again the old adage that a sequel is rarely equal. Re-reading it hasn't changed my opinion all that much. This is essentially five or six short books loosely held together by an over-arching story of the nuclear arms race from Hiroshima to the Cuban missile crisis. There's a book on the early Soviet nuclear weapons program, one on Soviet espionage from 1942 to the mid 50s, a third on American fission weapon development to 1952, another on American nuclear weapons policy, a fifth on the development of the hydrogen bomb, and a sixth on the destruction of J Robert Oppenheimer. The result is a book that's frequently fascinating, sometimes gripping, but rather plodding at times, terribly unfocused, and nowhere near as satisfying on an intellectual level.

If you struggled with TMOTAB, you'll doubtless find this an easier read. The science and physics have been streamlined and are easier to follow, the character introductions aren't quite as in-depth, and Rhodes has mostly done away with the heavy philosophy that tended to slow down that book's narrative. It's also a good 175 pages shorter, and the story moves along at a brisker pace. As I mentioned, there are some really fascinating parts, including detailed explanations of how the "Mike" device worked, insights into how deep the Soviets had infiltrated the Manhattan Project, and a rare look inside the Soviet atomic bomb program.

Unfortunately, if you ARE a fan of TMOTAB (and it seems like a lot of people are), this book also does away with many of the elements that made it so compelling. The characters are so thinly developed they might as well have Mafia nicknames (Lemay the Creepy Warmonger, Teller the Backstabber, Oppenheimer the Scapegoat, etc.). The pacing is all over the place; the first half is chock full of lengthy passages describing spies moving about the US, complete with explanations of where they slept, what restaurants they ate at, what train they took to get from one city to another, etc. The first Soviet nuclear test doesn't occur until 3-5th of the way in, and from that point on that book essentially races to the finish line. The actual "making of the hydrogen bomb" only occupies three chapters, much of which is devoted to attacking Edward Teller at every possible turn. There's no doubt that Dr. Teller was a flawed and extremely controversial figure, but Richard Rhodes spends so much time dragging him through the mud that any pretext of journalistic integrity has essentially evaporated by the last page.

"The Making of the Atomic Bomb" is not a flawless book; the first third drags a lot and Richard Rhodes is a little too in love with his own writing. It's still a much deeper, richer, more complex, and more satisfying read than "Dark Sun." I'd read two or three chapters of TMOTAB and go on an hour-long walk to process what I'd just read; I'd read 50 pages of "Dark Sun" and basically shrug my shoulders. To provide a relevant analogy, TMOTAB is a Fat Man implosion bomb - big, clumsy, and complicated, but nonetheless a monumental achievement that leaves a lasting impression. "Dark Sun" is akin to Andrei Sakharov's Layer Cake - a series of alternating heavy and light elements that provides a sufficiently large bang, but isn't particularly memorable when compared with the competition.
Androwyn
This book is an excellent companion to the author’s absolutely classic, “The Making of the Atomic Bomb.” It is the next step in atomic history. Perhaps, even to quote Fermi, “it can be done; and almost certainly will be done.”

In that case; this book is an inevitability.

The book starts out with a survey of what happened at Los Alamos and the invention of the fission bomb. Rhodes goes into painstaking detail regarding the development of the bomb and atomic espionage. He links the communist party of The United States to the infiltration by the Soviet Union the bomb project.

Clearly there were enough holes in the system the Russians were nearly up to date on everything we knew and used that information to their advantage by taking years off their own bomb program.

The book continues in describing the debate regarding the fusion bomb. Some scientists felt it should be made in the national interest and yet others thought it was a disaster. They preferred science spends its time on making nuclear power work in a non-military fashion
Not only does the author do a fantastic job of showing this debate. But he also shows us how the US moved forward and eventually produced the first hydrogen bomb. He ultimately finishes the book by describing in detail the Cuban Missile Crisis and how close we came to mutually assured destruction.

Without a doubt this is not an easy read. It’s the kind of heavy book you might read in a major history class. You need to know something about physics, history, some politics as they relate to the history. If you happen to have a keen interest in Atomic History, then this book is clearly written for you.

Ultimately, the book was entirely enjoyable. I look forward to reading more books by author. His making of the atomic bomb book was required reading when I was in college and still remains on my book shelf. Somethings never get old.

If you would like to know more about atomic history then I would suggest the author’s previous book, The Making of the Atomic Bomb or the magnificent book, “American Prometheus, “ by Kai Bird and Martin Sherwin.
Daiktilar
I believe Richard Rhodes would have received the Pulitzer Prize for this book if he had not already won it for its predecessor. Once again he brings to life a pivotal point in human history. The historical research is full and rich, and I was amazed that Rhodes was able to or allowed to unearth so much information inside the former Soviet Union. Romantic myths about American and British spies are shredded by his revelations. The one redeeming factor for many of those who betrayed democracy was that millions like them also believed the lies about the miracles of Soviet communism. Some honestly believed they were assisting an ally and its utopian system. My one criticism is that I think this book devotes too much time to the espionage and thus partly drowns out the scientific, ethical and political struggles in building the bomb that could snuff out life. Rhodes properly calls our attention to the foolishness of Mutually Assured Destruction. I believe, however, that he takes a too simplistic view of what this weapon can do in the hands of terrorists as its creators lose control of the genie they let out of the bottle. That aside this is a worthy addition to any library devoted to a realistic appraisal of human nature and achievement.

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