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by Robert A. Wilson

  • ISBN: 0312286961
  • Category: History
  • Author: Robert A. Wilson
  • Subcategory: Europe
  • Other formats: lit rtf mobi docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: SMP; 1st edition (December 31, 2002)
  • Pages: 608 pages
  • FB2 size: 1508 kb
  • EPUB size: 1939 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 529
Download In the Lion's Court: Power, Ambition and Sudden Death in the Reign of Henry VIII fb2

I tried comparing Henry VIII to the current President of the US. Then I thought, why not take it further and try to find . Henry's VIII's relationships with all six serve as the basis of Wilson's narrative.

I tried comparing Henry VIII to the current President of the US. Then I thought, why not take it further and try to find similar characters from the two time periods too? Wives: 1) First wife: Ivana was loyal and faithful like Catherine of Aragon. However, when she got old and her husband began an affair with a younger woman, she was thrown over. There were lions in London at that time ("the King's Beasts") housed in the Tower menagerie and a major tourist attraction. More once compared the king's court to a lion pit "in which the magnificent and deadly king of beasts held sway.

The story of Henry VIII and his six wives is a well-known .

The story of Henry VIII and his six wives is a well-known example of the caprice and violence that dominated that king's reign. Now Derek Wilson examines a set of relationships that more vividly illustrate just how dangerous life was in the court of the Tudor lion. In the Lion's Court is an illuminating examination of the careers of the six Thomases, whose lives are described in parallel-their family and social origins, their pathways to the royal Council chamber, their occupancy of the Siege Perilous, and the tragedies that, one by one, overwhelmed them

In the Lion's Court book. The story of Henry VIII and his six wives is a well-known example of the caprice and violence that dominated that King’s reign.

In the Lion's Court book. Now renowned historian Derek Wilson examines a set of relationships that more vividly illustrate just how dangerous life was in the court of the Tudor lion. He tells the interlocking stories of six men-all curiously enough named Thomas-whose The story of Henry VIII and his six wives is a well-known example of the caprice and violence that dominated that King’s reign. He tells the interlocking stories of six men-all, curiously enough, called Thomas-whose ambitions and principles brought them face to face with violent death, as recorded in a simple mnemonic:'Died, beheaded, beheaded,Self-slaughtered, burned, survived.

The story of Henry VIII and his six wives is a well-known example of the caprice . England's King Henry VIII has already been extensively discussed in various books as well as portrayed in a number of plays and films.

The story of Henry VIII and his six wives is a well-known example of the caprice and violence that dominated that Kingâ?™s reign.

In the Lion's Court: Power, Ambition, and Sudden Death in the Reign of Henry VIII. King Henry VIII remains one of the most controversial figures in our history. Wilson draws together all the most recent discoveries and looks afresh at the fascinating life and times of the Tudor monarch, particularly, looking at the King's childhood whic. The Plantagenet Chronicles 1154-1485: Richard the Lionheart, Richard II, Henry V, Richard III. by Derek Wilson.

Henry VIII had planned to be buried in a magnificent Renaissance tomb that he’d taken over from Wolsey but this was . Wilson, D. In the Lion’s Court: Power, Ambition, and Sudden Death in the Reign of Henry VIII, 2001.

Henry VIII had planned to be buried in a magnificent Renaissance tomb that he’d taken over from Wolsey but this was never completed. Work ceased on the tomb with the death of Edward VI and it was partially dismantled by the Commonwealth in 1649. Under Oliver Cromwell, most of the fine metalwork was sold off or melted down and the one remaining candlestick now rests in Ghent Cathedral. Filed Under: Henry VIII Tagged With: Archbishop Cranmer, Death of Henry VIII, Henry VIII's coffin, How did Henry VIII die?, St. George's Chapel, Where is Henry VIII buried.

In the Lion's Court is an illuminating examination of the careers of the six Thomases, whose lives are described in parallel - their family and social origins, their pathways to the royal Council chamber, their occupancy of the siege perilous, and the tragedies which, one by on. .

In the Lion's Court is an illuminating examination of the careers of the six Thomases, whose lives are described in parallel - their family and social origins, their pathways to the royal Council chamber, their occupancy of the siege perilous, and the tragedies which, one by one, overwhelmed them. By showing how events shaped and were shaped by relationships and personal destinies, Derek Wilson offers a fresh approach to the political narrative of a tumultuous reign.

Imprint: Vintage Digital. Published: 12/11/2014. Derek Wilson examines a set of relationships which illustrate just how dangerous life was in the court of the Tudor lion. He tells the interlocking stories of six men - all, curiously, called Thomas - whose ambitions and principles brought them face to face with violent death. Thomas Wolsey was an accused traitor on his way to the block when a kinder death intervened. Thomas More and Thomas Cromwell, whose convictions and policies could scarcely have been more different, both perished beneath the headman's axe.

Power, Ambition, and Sudden Death in the Reign of Henry VIII.

In the Lion's Court : Power, Ambition, and Sudden Death in the Reign of Henry VIII. The story of Henry VIII and his six wives is a well-known example of the caprice and violence that dominated that King's reign.

The story of Henry VIII and his six wives is a well-known example of the caprice and violence that dominated that KingÆs reign. Now renowned historian Derek Wilson examines a set of relationships that more vividly illustrate just how dangerous life was in the court of the Tudor lion. He tells the interlocking stories of six menùall curiously enough named Thomasùwhose ambitions and principles brought them face to face with violent death, as recorded in a simple mnemonic: "Died, beheaded, beheaded, Self-slaughtered, burned, survived."
Reviews about In the Lion's Court: Power, Ambition and Sudden Death in the Reign of Henry VIII (7):
Faegal
England's King Henry VIII has already been extensively discussed in various books as well as portrayed in a number of plays and films. Why another book? In his Introduction, Wilson acknowledges that much attention has been devoted to Henry's six wives (Three Catherines, two Annes, and a Jane) and shares this mnemonic:
"Divorced, beheaded, died,
Divorced, beheaded, survived."
and then observes: "I propose a different set of relationships which I believe offers a more illuminating approach to the court and government of Henry VIII. Specifically, Wilson focuses his primary attention on six Thomases: Wolsey, More, Cromwell, Howard, Wriothesley, and Cramner. "I can even suggest an alternative mortuary mnemonic, although one admittedly not so trippingly off the tongue.
Died, beheaded, beheaded,
Self-slaughtered, burned, survived."
Henry's VIII's relationships with all six serve as the basis of Wilson's narrative. There were lions in London at that time ("the King's Beasts") housed in the Tower menagerie and a major tourist attraction. More once compared the king's court to a lion pit "in which the magnificent and deadly king of beasts held sway."
Of the six, More interests me the most. One of my favorite plays and films is A Man for All Seasons. (In the film, More is brilliantly portrayed by Paul Scofield.) In both, Robert Bolt focuses on More's rectitude which threatens and infuriates Henry and eventually results in More's execution. Thus presented, More is a tragic but noble political victim and religious martyr, later canonized by the Roman Catholic Church. He is no less admirable as portrayed by Wilson but, in my opinion, is much more complicated than Bolt and others suggest. For years, More skillfully navigated his way through a court ("a lion pit") characterized by what Wilson refers to as its "seamy realities": "The royal entourage was a vicious, squirming world of competing ambitions and petty feuds, guilty secrets and salacious prudery,. Courtiers, vulnerable to threats and bribes, could be induced to perjure themselves, to exaggerate amorous incidents which were innocent in the context of stylised chivalric convention, to indulge personal vendettas....Over all these momentous happenings looms the larger-than-life figure of Henry VIII, powerful and capricious yet always an enigma."
In certain respects, this book reads as if it were a novel. It has a compelling narrative, dozens of unique characters, all manner of conflicts and intrigues which create great tension throughout, and a number of themes such as power, ambition, loyalty, betrayal, piety, terror, and (for most of the main characters) ignominious death. Wilson draws upon a wealth of primary sources to ensure the validity of his historical facts. However, some readers may question his interpretation of those facts. (A non-historian, I consider myself unqualified to do so.) Those who share my high regard for this book are urged to check out Alison Weir's Henry VIII as well as The Six Wives of Henry VIII, Karen Lindsey's Divorced, Beheaded, Survived, and David M. Loades's Henry VIII and His Queens.
Fordregelv
I recently read Alison Weir's "Henry VIII: The King And His Court" and it was interesting to read Derek Wilson's book covering Henry's reign, but looked at from a different perspective. Ms. Weir concentrated more on people and personalities, especially Henry's wives. Mr. Wilson chose to concentrate more on politics and religion. Both books are rewarding and since the approach taken by each author is different you get a fuller picture of the times by reading both.I suppose the main thought you are left with after reading Mr. Wilson's book is what a precarious existence anyone connected with Henry's court led! We are not just talking about his wives but anyone involved in the political or religious life of the court. As Henry got older and his once robust health began to deteriorate he became very moody and unpredictable. Both Wilson and Weir make the point that Henry was very athletic up until he was about 40 years old or so. He was a very vain man and could not accept his physical decline. He was also used to getting his own way and couldn't tolerate it when his desires and wishes were thwarted. He could be genial one moment and lash out verbally or physically the next. He could be ruthless if he felt that you couldn't give him what he wanted. In that case you were disposable- as several wives found out, as well as people such as Thomas Wolsey and Thomas More and Thomas Cromwell. You come away wondering why anyone would marry this man or choose to work for him. It was like being next to a ticking timebomb.....One example will suffice to show that there were seemingly no limits to Henry's ruthlessness. When he was intent on having his son as his heir he wanted his daughter Mary (by Catherine of Aragon) to assure him that she would not "give any trouble" about the succession. He sent over Thomas Cromwell and the Duke of Norfolk to play "good cop, bad cop". Cromwell was the "good cop" and when it became clear that his approach wasn't doing the trick, Norfolk screamed at Mary and told her that if "she were his daughter he would smash her head against the wall until it was as soft as a boiled apple".Violent times they were, and filled with violent people. Henry, without flinching, would allow the burning of "heretics", including digging up someone found after death to have been a "heretic" and having the corpse burned. You could be sent to the Tower of London at the drop of a hat, and be in constant fear that it was not only your hat that might drop off....Try both of these books, as they complement each ther nicely and are in no way redundant. I don't think you will be disappointed!
Brariel
I found the book was a thorough survey of the court and broader geo-politics politics that coursed through the long reign of Henry 8. Wilson particularly focused on the times, activities, and fates of Cardinal Wolsey and Thomas More, with seeming lesser attention to the other 'Thomases' he profiled through the Tudor dynasty. Very informative, slightly inclined to get bogged down in detail from time to time, but nonetheless a well-written and enjoyable history lesson.
Thomeena
Just finished the above book and found it very interesting. It tells the story of six men, all with the first name of Thomas, and what they did during the reign of Henry Vlll. It is definitely not a book for someone who has no idea of the Tudor court and only remembers that Henry had six wives. These wives are only mentioned in passing, except for Anne Boleyn who rates a few more pages, and will be a disappointment to those expecting an easy read.It looks at the men behind the throne and how they maneuvered themselves into positions of great power at whatever cost. Great detail and simply fascinating. Some of it is a little hard going, but those passages don't last long. I really liked it when Mr Wilson compared 500 years ago with what happens today. Not much has changed!

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