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by fiona Swabey

  • ISBN: 0415925118
  • Category: History
  • Author: fiona Swabey
  • Subcategory: Europe
  • Other formats: doc azw txt rtf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge (November 30, 1999)
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • FB2 size: 1362 kb
  • EPUB size: 1279 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 243
Download Medieval Gentlewoman: Life in a Gentry Household in the Later Middle Ages fb2

Ffiona Swabey's "The Medieval Gentlewoman" is a terrific book for anyone interested in what life was like for the gentry in late 14th/early 15th century England

Ffiona Swabey's "The Medieval Gentlewoman" is a terrific book for anyone interested in what life was like for the gentry in late 14th/early 15th century England.

Medieval Gentlewoman book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Medieval Gentlewoman: Life in a Gentry Household in the Later Middle Ages as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

De Bryene, Alice, Dame, ca. 1360-1434 or 5, Women, Households, Gentry. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on July 24, 2015. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Gentlewoman : Life in a Gentry Household in the Later Middle Ages.

Medieval Gentlewoman : Life in a Gentry Household in the Later Middle Ages.

Prince of pleasure': The indiscretions of a young Edward VII, detailed in a new book from biographer Jane Ridley, were said to have scandalised his parents. The Heir Apparent by Jane Ridley.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Medieval Gentlewoman: Life in a Gentry . Alice's household book and other sources paint a picture of the public and private roles of medieval women of the estate-owning class.

Alice's household book and other sources paint a picture of the public and private roles of medieval women of the estate-owning class.

Household ordinances may also create the illusion that servants' duties were more fixed than they really were. A good book you'll probably want to see is Ffiona Swabey's Medieval Gentlewoman: Life in a Gentry Household in the Later Middle Ages. Kate Mertes has observed that in practice the job descriptions for many household offices overlapped, especially in smaller households and earlier centuries. Many servants were jacks of all trades who did whatever needed doing. There is also the question of the gender of household servants.

MEDIEVAL GENTLEWOMAN: LIFE IN A GENTRY HOUSEHOLD IN THE LATER MIDDLE AGES. CONSTRUCTIONS OF WIDOWHOOD AND VIRGINITY IN THE MIDDLE AGES. Young medieval women. Published: 1 July 2001.

Rubin, Ernest (1972) "Statistical Exploration of a Medieval Household Book" in The American Statistician vol. 26 no. 5 (December 1972) pp. 37–39. Swabey, ffiona (1999) Medieval Gentlewoman: life in a gentry household in the later Middle Ages.

Concerning Lady Agnes’s obvious independence and control of her household and business interests . For pleasure as well as information there is Medieval Gentlewoman: Life in a Widow’s Household in the Later Middle Ages by Fiona Swaby.

Concerning Lady Agnes’s obvious independence and control of her household and business interests, something should be said about the myth of medieval women as helpless pawns in a male-dominated society structure. By the 1400s, before the Renaissance came to England, women had more legal and economic rights than at any time afterward until the late twentieth century. For an actual medieval legal case concerning bastard (or not) heirs there is The Armburgh Papers, ed. by Christine Carpenter.

This study provides an important addition to current work on women in late medieval England. Its starting point is evidence from the life of one particular woman, Alice de Bryene, a Suffolk heiress of the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries. As a widow and owner of several large estates, she appears to have enjoyed greater status, influence and independence than most married women of the period.Through an examination of Alice's "Household Book," and using other extant contemporary sources, the author has been able to illuminate the experiences of medieval women in general. The resulting work provides a vivid picture of life in the medieval household, examining marriage and widowhood, daily household and estate management, hospitality and entertainment, education, patronage, religious concerns and the private and public roles of medieval women of the estate-owning class.
Reviews about Medieval Gentlewoman: Life in a Gentry Household in the Later Middle Ages (3):
Vinainl
I bought this book to assist me in creating my character when I was playing in the Society for Creative Anachronism. I wanted the freedom to be a single woman, wealthy enough to live on my own without the responsibilities that great status would bring. Rich enough to be comfortable, but not so rich as to be a target for marriage to a man looking for a rich marriage portion, and well connected to men who would protect me without interfering with my life.

Alice de Brynne fit the bill nicely. As a householder and landowner of several large estates, she had more freedom than most women of her time, and she spent it in tending to her estates. Her day-to-day life was closely attuned to her tenants and their needs. According to her account books, her daily meals with her tenants were simple, with occasional meals more lavish than usual when entertaining visiting prelates or aristocracy. She knew the names and families of her workers. Hers was a familiar face in the fields and workhouses on the main estate of Acton.

In addition to being full of the detail of daily life, this book is beautifully produced, with many black-and-white pictures as well as color pictures. It is a detailed portrait of an ordinary medieval gentlewoman.
Best West
This is a great starter book for those who are interested in a medieval gentrywoman's life.Ffiona Swabey is an interesting writer who gives us a general idea of Alice de Bryne's life, and consequently any gentry woman's life in general. It was interesting to see that although Alice was considered gentry, not aristocracy, and therefore lower on the wealth scale, this woman still had numerous estates, four personal chaplains, dozens of servants and hundreds of peasants working under her.
Madis
Ffiona Swabey's "The Medieval Gentlewoman" is a terrific book for anyone interested in what life was like for the gentry in late 14th/early 15th century England. Her book is written based on household accounts and records from Acton Manor, the estate of Dame Alice Bryene, a widow in her 50s in the period the book covers. Ms. Swabey analyzes the data from the household accounts to give us a vivid picture of Dame Alice's life and the world in which she lived and conducted business. Despite the fact that it is heavy with primary documentation, this book is not at all dry. Ms. Swabey manages to tell us a story while retaining the accuracy that we historical reenactors desire.

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