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by Paul M. Kennedy

  • ISBN: 1591023742
  • Category: History
  • Author: Paul M. Kennedy
  • Subcategory: Europe
  • Other formats: lrf txt docx doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Humanity Books; 2 edition (October 30, 2006)
  • Pages: 405 pages
  • FB2 size: 1371 kb
  • EPUB size: 1161 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 111
Download The Rise And Fall of British Naval Mastery fb2

Paul M. Kennedy is J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History at Yale University. Easy to understand does not read like a textbook.

Paul M. The author of thirteen books, he is perhaps best known for The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers. His most recent publication (2006) is The Parliament of Man: The Past, Present, and Future of the United Nations.

Paul Kennedy's classic naval history, now updated with a new introduction by the authorThis acclaimed book traces Britain's rise and fall as a sea power from the Tudors to the present day. Challenging the traditional view that the British . .

I expected this book to focus on the minutia of naval tactics and naval warship building

I expected this book to focus on the minutia of naval tactics and naval warship building. Thankfully, this novel did not dive too deeply into those subjects. Instead, Kennedy walks through the grand strategy that Britain chose to employ throughout the 1600s-1900s. Sidenotes: I have read Rise and Fall of the Great Powers multiple times, so getting into Kennedy's early work was interesting, especially for two points he raises in the very end of the book: 1. He is getting more interested in the rise and fall of great powers, he says.

First published in 1976, this book is the first detailed examination of the history of British sea power since . Mahan's classic The Influence of Sea Power on History, published in 1890. In analyzing the reasons for the rise and fall of Great Britain as a predominant maritime nation in the period from the Tudors to the present day, Professor Kennedy sets the Royal Navy within a framework of national, international, economic, political and strategical considerations.

The Rise and Fall of British Naval Mastery (1986). ISBN 1-57392-278-1 (2nd edn.

In his 2006 book The Parliament of Man, Kennedy contemplates the past and future of the United Nations. The Rise and Fall of British Naval Mastery (1986). 2006).

First published in 1976, this book is the first detailed examination of the history of British sea power since . Mahan's classic "The Influence of Sea Power on History," published in 1890.

The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers. The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers: Economic Change and Military Conflict from 1500 to 2000, by Paul Kennedy, first published in 1987, explores the politics and economics of the Great Powers from 1500 to 1980 and the reason for their decline. It then continues by forecasting the positions of China, Japan, the European Economic Community (EEC), the Soviet Union and the United States through the end of the 20th century.

I'm not looking for masses of information guys and girls just the main points.

Paul Kennedy's classic naval history, now updated with a new introduction by the author. This acclaimed book traces Britain's rise and fall as a sea power from the Tudors to the present day.

Kennedy wrote this book ten years before Rise and Fall of the Great Powers, not as a compilation afterwards. The book I bought was in excellent shape. The content was interesting enogh. It was required reading for graduate school, so I did not actually choose it as a book to read. Second, he doesn't talk about the US Navy because it is not the subject of his book.

First published in 1976, this book is the first detailed examination of the history of British sea power since A.T. Mahan's classic The Influence of Sea Power on History, published in 1890. In analyzing the reasons for the rise and fall of Great Britain as a predominant maritime nation in the period from the Tudors to the present day, Professor Kennedy sets the Royal Navy within a framework of national, international, economic, political and strategical considerations.To this new paperback edition the author has added a new introduction that brings the discussion of naval power up to date, with special emphasis on today’s enormous U.S. Navy as the prime contemporary example of the use of naval forces to wield global influence.
Reviews about The Rise And Fall of British Naval Mastery (7):
xander
Without taking a definite position on Mahan or geopolitics,
the book presents British naval power as a textbook example
of how an island nation became first a regional naval power
and then rose to global pre-eminence. The parts about how
the first wave of global trade interacted with the Industrial
Revolution are especially interesting.

It then goes on to describe how a mixture of politics, social
problems, and economic neglect weakened the British Navy, at
a time when newly industrialized countries like Germany,
Japan, and America were becoming stronger.

The end of the story is well known, as two Pyrrhic Victories
against Germany shattered the British Empire in the 20th century.

---

As an American, I find the description of how Britain in the late
1800s neglected its education system and engaged in trade policies
which destroyed the physical economy to be much too close to home.
This book can be read as a cautionary tale of what could happen to
the United States is we are not careful.
energy breath
Good review of British naval sea power both it's rise and fall. Easy to understand does not read like a textbook
Ranterl
The title of this book, in my opinion, is misleading. I was expecting Specifications of British Naval Vessels, Research & Development in Vessel Engineering, Naval Strategy, Naval Tactics, Seamen's skill sets & equipment vis-a-vis their main opponents during periods of peace & war etc during the rise & fall of British Naval Mastery. Instead this book was about British Geopolitics & Macro-economics & the British Navy's role within that framework. As interesting as this topic is, I was disappointed because I wanted to read a different book. However, this book does a decent job in addressing what this book is really about, albeit it being biased towards Britain being some kind of Holy Nation. The Author doesn't even mention once the term "Opium War(s)" or "Concentration Camps" which the British invented during the Boer War. The Author comes across as if Britain was doing the whole World some kind of favour by expanding & consolidating her interests. Very little was mentioned that Britain was emulating Portugal's & Holland's lead, they were the real pioneers of Colonialism & International Finance. Give me a break!

I will now succinctly describe Britain's geopolitical strategy during their rise & zenith: Assuming Britain was one of the top three nations in Western Europe, if the number one nation was in conflict with the number two nation, Britain would support the number two nation. If the number two nation was in conflict with the number three nation, Britain would support the number three nation. If the number one nation was in conflict with the number three nation, Britain would support the number three nation. If two out of the top three nations formed an alliance & there was a conflict between them & some other nation(s), Britain would support the weaker nations. While this was going on or not, Britain would expand & consolidate her overseas Empire whilst always either developing the strongest Navy on the planet or maintaining the strongest Navy on the planet. Throw in some skewed diplomacy, an obsession with Naval Blockades & voila, you have an enormous Empire while the rest of Western Europe was too busy asleep at the wheel to realise what was going on, even though they themselves were losing colonies all around the World to Britain. If you are wondering, how did they afford all this, the answer is that they had a very small Army, constructing vessels was not as expensive as in modern times, they invented Central Banking in 1694, the public accepted fiat currency once it was introduced & no nation came even close to them in the magnitude of international trade once they got to the zenith. Pretty simple if you ask me & you probably do not need to read the book anymore.

On the positive side, this book is well written, broken up in chapters that are logical i.e. the different periods during the rise, zenith & fall of the British Empire. Some interesting tables in regards to nation comparisons, vessels, macro-economic data etc during different periods. The improving & then decline in Britain's macro-economy is also well described, discussing inflation, national debt, trade deficits/surpluses & comparisons with other nations. For the Naval Strategists out there, the Author does sprinkle Mahan & Mackinder throughout this book, however I found it superficial & it left me wanting more. The Author also gets into the pivotal agreements over a short period of time which secured American hegemony, the passing of the baton, if you wish. Thank you Mr Kennedy for your contribution in this field, even though the title of your book was misleading & you are biased.
Paster
This is not a review of the actually content, I think the material is superb and gives great incite into the change of perceived and real projection power of the Royal Navy and its influence on world events. This is a voicing of my frustration with the quality of the book binding. By the second day of reading this book it split in two, and by completion of reading it is in several sections. I have never had this happen with a new book and I am not sure if this is a systematic or isolated issue.
Tansino
For anyone concerned about America's declining manufacturing base this book will confirm your fears. This book is not really a book about the British Navy as it is a book about rise and decline of Britain. The book starts out describing how naval warfare gave Europe an advantage in world affairs and how Britain came to dominate the seas. After the defeat of Napoleon Britain was able to become the "workshop of the world" and it dominated world trade for about 50 years. Once the rest of Europe and the US began to industrialize English industries gradually began to disappear because of the increase competition.

Then in the 1890's Mahan wrote the Influence of Sea Power upon History and Britain was suddenly thrust into an arms race with German, the US, and Japan. Once the arms race started Britain slowly reduced the number of ship stationed overseas (Britain used to have ships in Canada, the Caribbean, and Asia) and it began to form alliances with France and Japan to protect its empire. Britain no longer had the worlds largest economy and it had difficulty maintaining its naval supremacy.

WWI accelerated Britons decline and WWII regulated the country to a second rate status when compared with the US and the USSR. Reading this book you learn that the strength and the size of a nation's economy determines its power and only a nation with a strong industrial base can support a large military and social services.

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