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by Meirion Hughes

  • ISBN: 0754605884
  • Category: History
  • Author: Meirion Hughes
  • Subcategory: Europe
  • Other formats: azw lrf doc mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (April 28, 2002)
  • Pages: 260 pages
  • FB2 size: 1641 kb
  • EPUB size: 1960 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 333
Download The English Musical Renaissance and the Press 1850-1914: Watchmen of Music (Music in Nineteenth-Century Britain) fb2

The English Musical Renaissance and the Press 1850–1914: Watchmen of Music Meirion Hughes vi + 248 Music in 19th-Century Britain.

The English Musical Renaissance and the Press 1850–1914: Watchmen of Music Meirion Hughes vi + 248 Music in 19th-Century Britain. Ashgate Aldershot 2002 £4. 0 0-7546-0588-4 By Meirion Hughes. Music in 19th-Century Britain.

J A Fuller Maitland, critic on The Times, described music journalists as 'watchmen on the walls of music', and Meirion Hughes extends this metaphor to explore their crucial role in building and safeguarding what came to be known as the English Musical Renaissance

J A Fuller Maitland, critic on The Times, described music journalists as 'watchmen on the walls of music', and Meirion Hughes extends this metaphor to explore their crucial role in building and safeguarding what came to be known as the English Musical Renaissance. Part One of the book looks at the critics in the context of the publications for which they worked, while Part Two focuses on the relationship between the watchmen-critics and three composers: Arthur Sullivan, Hubert Parry and Edward Elgar

Volume 35 Issue 3. Meirion Hughes. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 11 July 2014.

Volume 35 Issue 3. Journal of British Studies. Recommend this journal.

His 1902 book English Music in the XIXth Century is subdivided into two parts: "Book I: Before the .

His 1902 book English Music in the XIXth Century is subdivided into two parts: "Book I: Before the Renaissance (1801–1850)", and "Book II: The Renaissance (1851–1900)". Hughes, p. 143; and Stradling and Hughes, p. 140. ^ Kennedy, p. 8; and Stradling and Hughes, p. 41.

Meirion Hughes, a freelance historian, co-authored (with .

Meirion Hughes, a freelance historian, is especially interested in the relationship of music and politics . Indeed the term ‘Renaissance’ was first used, in September 1882, by the eminent music journalist Joseph Bennett, chief critic of the Daily Telegraph.

Meirion Hughes, a freelance historian, is especially interested in the relationship of music and politics, particularly as it applied during the evolution of the late-nineteenth century English Musical Renaissance. As Meirion Hughes says:. critics and criticism had come a long way in the Victorian age. As the second half of the nineteenth century unfolded, critics were increasingly seen as cultural curators and high priests.

His 1902 book English Music in the XIXth Century{{ Maitland used the term "English" to. .

His 1902 book English Music in the XIXth Century{{ Maitland used the term "English" to include the Irish Stanford and the Scottish Mackenzie and all other non-English British composers. group n}} is subdivided into two parts: "Book I: Before the Renaissance (1801–1850)", and "Book II: The Renaissance (1851–1900). Kennedy, p.

The English Musical Renaissance and the Press 1850-1914: Watchmen of Music: The Watchmen of Music (Music in.

The English Musical Renaissance and the Press 1850-1914: Watchmen of Music: The Watchmen of Music (Music in Nineteenth-Century Britain). Despite all the criticism in this book, British composers of the 20th century produced a lot of superb music - the music will be played and appreciated long after this book has been consigned to mouldering shelves. 7 people found this helpful.

2 Meirion Hughes, The English Musical Renaissance and the Press 1850–1914: Watchmen of Music, p. 6. 66. 3 Ibid. 4Appointed music critic by The Sunday Times in 1865 and The Telegraph in 1870, he contributed extensive music analyses and reports to other periodicals, among them The Musical Standard and The Musical Times (as we have seen, upon the London premiere of Verdi’s Requiem, Bennett authored a detailed analysis of Verdi’s score). 5 As he narrates in his memoirs, in.

Watchmen of Music (Music in Nineteenth Century Britain) (Music in Nineteenth Century Britain) (Music in.Published June 2002 by Ashgate Publishing. There's no description for this book yet.

Watchmen of Music (Music in Nineteenth Century Britain) (Music in Nineteenth Century Britain) (Music in Nineteenth Century Britain).

The importance of nineteenth-century writing about culture has long been accepted by scholars, yet so far as music criticism is concerned, Victorian England has been an area of scholarly neglect. This state of affairs is all the more surprising given that the quantity of such criticism in the Victorian and Edwardian press was vast, much of it displaying a richness and diversity of critical perspectives. Through the study of music criticism from several key newspapers and journals (specifically The Times, Daily Telegraph, Athenaeum and The Musical Times), this book examines the reception history of new English music in the period surveyed and assesses its cultural, social and political, importance. Music critics projected and promoted English composers to create a national music of which England could be proud. J A Fuller Maitland, critic on The Times, described music journalists as 'watchmen on the walls of music', and Meirion Hughes extends this metaphor to explore their crucial role in building and safeguarding what came to be known as the English Musical Renaissance. Part One of the book looks at the critics in the context of the publications for which they worked, while Part Two focuses on the relationship between the watchmen-critics and three composers: Arthur Sullivan, Hubert Parry and Edward Elgar. Hughes argues that the English Musical Renaissance was ultimately a success thanks largely to the work of the critics. In so doing, he provides a major re-evaluation of the impact of journalism on British music history.

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