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by Frances A. Yates

  • ISBN: 0712698949
  • Category: History
  • Author: Frances A. Yates
  • Subcategory: Europe
  • Other formats: txt docx azw lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House UK; New edition edition (March 27, 1993)
  • Pages: 256 pages
  • FB2 size: 1994 kb
  • EPUB size: 1108 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 315
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Paperback, 256 pages. Published March 27th 1993 by Pimlico (first published January 1st 1975).

Paperback, 256 pages.

Astraea is also referenced in John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost, in Book IV between lines 990 and 1000. Perseus Latin Word Study Tool. Retrieved 16 November 2014. cf. Frances Yates, Astraea : The Imperial Theme in the Sixteenth Century

Astraea is also referenced in John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost, in Book IV between lines 990 and 1000. When Satan is discovered in the Garden of Eden and brought before the Angel Gabriel, the two are on the verge of war. " Hung forth in Heav'n his golden Scales, yet seen. Frances Yates, Astraea : The Imperial Theme in the Sixteenth Century. Frederick A. de Armas, The Return of Astraea: An Astral-Imperial Myth in Calderon.

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Dame Frances Amelia Yates DBE (28 November 1899 – 29 September 1981) was a British historian Frances A. Yates. Author of The Art of Memory, The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age, and The Rosicrucian Enlightenment.

Looking for books by Frances A. Yates? . Books by Frances A. Astraea: The Imperial Theme in the Sixteenth Century. Yates? See all books authored by Frances A. Yates, including The Rosicrucian Enlightenment, and The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age, and more on ThriftBooks. The Rosicrucian Enlightenment. John Florio: The Life of an Italian in Shakespeare's England. Study of Loves Labour's Lost.

Queen Elizabeth as astraea. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 10:27-82 (1947). Similar books and articles. This article has no associated abstract. No keywords specified (fix it). Categories. Joseph B. Code - 1941 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 16 (1):156-157. Queen Elizabeth’s Godson. Helen Parry Eden - 1927 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 2 (2):299-313. Queen Elizabeth I as Urania. Jean Wilson - 2006 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 69:151 - 173.

Frances Amelia Yates, DBE, FBA (28 November 1899 – 29 September 1981) was an English historian who focused on the study of the Renaissance. In an academic capacity, she taught at the Warburg Institute of the University of London for many years, and also wrote a number of books on the subject of esoteric history. Yates was born to a middle-class family in Portsmouth, and was largely self-educated, before attaining a BA and MA in French at University College London

rances Yates began her last book, The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age, by emphasizing that, like all her . 39. Frances A. Yates, Astraea: The Imperial Theme in the Sixteenth Century (1975, London: Pimlico, 1993), 87. 40. Ibid.

rances Yates began her last book, The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age, by emphasizing that, like all her writings, it was a purely historical study. I ask to be forgiven for here ignoring Dame Yates’ injunction about how to read her work. Many of Yates’ writings are well-known to historians of philosophy,1 but I want to speak about some of her work from a systematic philosophical point of view.

This book examines the images and symbolism of European monarchy in the 16th century. The accession of Charles V, with his vast dominions in both the old and new worlds, was the occasion for a renewal of the myth of Empire in the West. The theme was echoed in the pageants and ballets of the declining Valois dynasty in France and, in particular, in the glorification of Elizabeth I. This book attempts to illuminate reader's understanding of the Renaissance monarchies as they struggled with the dark undertow of reformation and counter-reformation.
Reviews about Astraea (Pimlico) (3):
Burisi
This is one of Yates' more ambitious books (though certainly not her most). It deals mostly with Elizabeth I, and the symbolism, pageantry and myth built around her during her reign, the historical underpinnings of that symbolism, etc., as well as other international manifestations of similar, coeval myth-making (such as in France). I read Yates mostly because of her unique but very important perspective on Shakespeare's world, as her preface to Astraea offers:

"Almost a lifetime has been spent in trying to understand a period which has always seemed, not a dead past, but vitally important for present imaginative and spiritual life. The present book draws close, though indirectly to Shakespeare; this world of the 'imperial theme' is surely the world in which Shakespeare's imagination operates, and, though I have carefully avoided stressing this, the route followed here may indicate a historical opening towards a new understanding of Shakespeare's religion." (xi)

If you're just trying to get a little more perspective on Shakespeare's world, this book may not be the place to start. (I'd try The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age or Shakespeare's Last Plays, among others, instead.) But if you're really digging deep, whether into Shakespeare's world, Elizabeth's, or just into general late renaissance history, this is a great book.
Visonima
The leading Renaissance scholar of our time, Dame Frances A. Yates ("the most life-enhancing historian I knew", Hugh Trevor-Roper) in this enthralling reconstruction gave us the best example of her original scientific method. Using a new approach ("to history through imagery"), she focuses on the symbolism of Elizabethan 'imperial theme'. These allegorical intellectual portraits of Protestant chivalry in England and the French Pleiadist movement seems to contain an inspiring meta-historical documents. The genesis of this far-sighted study on "Queen Elizabeth I as Astraea" goes back to a sermon lecture (on Arcadian 'Virgo-Regina' and her apologists, prophetical poets like Peele, Spenser or Sidney) given in 1945 and first published in the famous "Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institute", X,1947. Out of a central essay grew the four "Empire Lectures" originally given at London University Senate House (in January 1952), on the very same theme (imperial political theme in the Middle Ages and Renaissance). Later, it appeared as academic seminars at her favourite "Warburg Institute" and at the Cornell University (1967-70). Summa summarum, this part of Yate's final "Astraea:The Imperial Theme in the Sixteenth Century" have been at first published as a French translation(!). Other texts from the present volume was originally contributed to a various symposiums, colloquiums, Warburg "Journal", "Slade Lectures" and even for a "Annales musicologiques"! Of course, some important parts of the paper were newly written just for this book. Anyway, this is thorough re-analysis of literature, mithology, science and philosophy in Elizabethan (many use to call it rather: "Shakespearian") times. It really challenges the current "modernist" ortodoxies of thinking "without history" and give shape and meaning to traditional ("neo-Hermetic") point of view. Those series of important and inovative essays reflects (through the competitive jugment by thinkers like Charles Schmitt, George Boas, Asa Briggs and Lord Dacre):"one of the most exciting and original of modern English historians: original because she came out of no pre-existing English school but created her own discipline; exciting because, by her enthusiasm and vitality, she inspired pupils who now continue her work...she was essentially a HISTORIAN OF THOUGHT". Or: "Frances Yates is that rare thing, a truly thrilling scholar. Her books on Renaissance history and thinking are alive with poetic instinct and inspired speculation, densely cross-patterned with recurring themes like one huge, continuous tapestry". In the context of a dominant,post-modern culture Frances Yates summary-books stands (eighteen years after her death) as the best and concrete proof for abilities of one typical European metaphysical soul to place famous incarnation of mythical "Faerie Queene" Elizabeth in the global (more than) historical context. A superb study!
Rishason
The leading Renaissance scholar of our time, Dame Frances A. Yates ("the most life-enhancing historian I knew", Hugh Trevor-Roper) in this enthralling reconstruction gave us the best example of her original scientific method. Using a new approach ("to history through imagery"), she focuses on the symbolism of Elizabethan 'imperial theme'. These allegorical intellectual portraits of Protestant chivalry in England and the French Pleiadist movement seems to contain an inspiring meta-historical documents. The genesis of this far-sighted study on "Queen Elizabeth I as Astraea" goes back to a sermon lecture (on Arcadian 'Virgo-Regina' and her apologists, prophetical poets like Peele, Spenser or Sidney) given in 1945 and first published in the famous "Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institute", X,1947. Out of a central essay grew the four "Empire Lectures" originally given at London University Senate House (in January 1952), on the very same theme (imperial political theme in the Middle Ages and Renaissance). Later, it appeared as academic seminars at her favourite "Warburg Institute" and at the Cornell University (1967-70). Summa summarum, this part of Yate's final "Astraea:The Imperial Theme in the Sixteenth Century" have been at first published as a French translation(!). Other texts from the present volume was originally contributed to a various symposiums, colloquiums, Warburg "Journal", "Slade Lectures" and even for a "Annales musicologiques"! Of course, some important parts of the paper were newly written just for this book. Anyway, this is thorough re-analysis of literature, mithology, science and philosophy in Elizabethan (many use to call it rather: "Shakespearian") times. It really challenges the current "modernist" ortodoxies of thinking "without history" and give shape and meaning to traditional ("neo-Hermetic") point of view. Those series of important and inovative essays reflects (through the competitive jugment by thinkers like Charles Schmitt, George Boas, Asa Briggs and Lord Dacre):"one of the most exciting and original of modern English historians: original because she came out of no pre-existing English school but created her own discipline; exciting because, by her enthusiasm and vitality, she inspired pupils who now continue her work...she was essentially a HISTORIAN OF THOUGHT". Or: "Frances Yates is that rare thing, a truly thrilling scholar. Her books on Renaissance history and thinking are alive with poetic instinct and inspired speculation, densely cross-patterned with recurring themes like one huge, continuous tapestry". Believe it or not, you can find at real unexpected places - even in nowadays Serbia - Miss Yates's fans and inspired pupils; just look (if it is anyhow possible) Dragoslav Bokan's recent study on relate subjects titled "Ognjeni Ljiljani" ("Fire Lillies", SKC 1998) or Belgrade translation of her thoughtful "The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age", with extensive preface by domestic authorities. In the context of a dominant,post-modern culture Frances Yates summary-books stands (eighteen years after her death) as the best and concrete proof for abilities of one typical European metaphysical soul to place famous incarnation of mythical "Faerie Queene" Elizabeth in the global (more than) historical context. A superb study!

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