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by Charles O Hucker

  • ISBN: 0804709793
  • Category: History
  • Author: Charles O Hucker
  • Subcategory: Asia
  • Other formats: txt docx mobi lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press (December 12, 1975)
  • FB2 size: 1976 kb
  • EPUB size: 1671 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 583
Download China's Imperial Past: An Introduction to Chinese History and Culture fb2

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China's Imperial Past is different The book includes 47 plates, eight maps, and various charts, and as. .

China's Imperial Past is different. Not only does it treat the three major periods of Chinese history at roughly equal length, weaving all their complexity into a balanced, integrated whole, but it gives ample space to China's magnificent literary and artistic achievements. This detailed summary of Chinese history and culture seems to be a standard in the field, since I see it frequently when browsing in the Asian history section of bookstores. China's Imperial Past, by Charles O. Hucker, is the best introduction to Chinese culture from earliest times to the 19th century. The author's approach is primarily interpretive, emphasizing patterns of change and development rather than factual details, but he never loses sight of the particularities that made traditional Chinese civilization one of the richest in human history.

He was regarded as one of the foremost historians of Imperial China and a leading figure in the promotion of academic programs in Asian Studies during the 1950s and 1960s. Born in St. Louis, Hucker graduated from the University of Texas, and served in the Army Air Corps during the Second World War, where he rose to the rank of major and was awarded the Bronze Star

What's the most interesting is to understand the foundations of culture, of social structures, customs and behaviours.

book by Charles O. Hucker. I am new to Chinese history, but based on reading many other history books on other subjects, I can say that this is a great introductory book. It's worth noting that Hucker studied with . What's the most interesting is to understand the foundations of culture, of social structures, customs and behaviours.

Charles O. Hucker's China to 1850, a contracted and condensed version of his highly extolled China's Imperial Past . Hucker's China to 1850, a contracted and condensed version of his highly extolled China's Imperial Past, is a solid, precise, scholarly work. It would probably best suit the general reader who wants a glance at China's past. To an undergraduate class, it also offers an inexpensive alternate. This small book is well proportioned and balanced in its coverage of political and social institutions, literature, art, thought, and religion, as well as material culture and technology. It weaves together chronologically all aspects of Chinese life and culture, broadly surveying general history, socioeconomic organization, political institutions, religion and thought, and art and literature.

On Culture Modernization of New China During the Past 60 Years. Jing Zhang & Ya-Guang Ji - 2009 - Nankai University (Philosophy and Social Sciences) 5:13-19. A Comparison of Chinese and British Tea Culture. Ni Wang - 2011 - Asian Culture and History 3 (2):p13. Modern Chinese Thought: A Retrospective View and a Look Into the Future. Chen Lai - 1993 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 24 (3):3-24. On Ups and Downs of Chinese Cultural Confidence. Guiying Zhou - 2012 - Asian Culture and History 4 (2):p140. Added to PP index 2016-09-07. Total views 8 ( of 2,277,206 ). Recent downloads (6 months) 8 ( of 2,277,206 ).

China's Imperial Past, by Charles O. Hucker, is the best introduction to Chinese culture from earliest times to.

Chinas Imperial Past : An Introduction to Chinese History and Culture by Charles O. Many thanks to the organisations who are kindly helping us through grants or sponsorships. Do you want to sponsor us?

Chinas Imperial Past : An Introduction to Chinese History and Culture by Charles O. Stanford University Press,1975. Recommended By. Numerous educational institutions recommend us, including Oxford University, Michigan State University, and University of Minnesota. We have also been recommended for educational use by the following publications: Grants & Sponsorships. Do you want to sponsor us? Partners.

1 Hucker, Charles . The traditional Chinese State in Ming times (1368-1644), Tucson, The Univ. of Arizona Press, 1961, 85 . Hucker, Charles . The censorial System Ming China, Stanford, Stanford UP, 1966, viii- 406 p. 2 Shiba Yoshinobu, Commerce and society in Sung China, trad. par Mark Elvin, Ann Arbor, Michigan abstracts of Chinese and Japanese works on Chinese history. Recommend this journal.

Book by Hucker, Charles O.
Reviews about China's Imperial Past: An Introduction to Chinese History and Culture (7):
komandante
I am new to Chinese history, but based on reading many other history books on other subjects, I can say that this is a great introductory book. It's worth noting that Hucker studied with H.G. Creel (author of the excellent "The Birth of China") and dedicates the book to him. To me, this says a lot about Hucker's dedication to the subject. This is a fine book and the organization is unique--the first chapter of each section sketches out a basic chronology, and subsequent chapters flesh out the details about government, society, thought, and art. This book covers a LOT of ground, but it does it fairly well. As an aside, I once tried reading a one-volume history of China and found it unbearable (it had to cover too much history in too few pages), but Hucker's decision to cut off this book at 1850 allows for a more focused and readable treatment. I recommend this book.
Ndlaitha
China - Forget all the noise you can get stuck with from Foreign Affairs and the rest of the present Harvard Brain-trust. Read this book. It's old, it coincentrates on the long past as CHina developed into the modern ages. It gives you the background so that when you read news about China or watch CCTV you get the sub-story, the stuff that is always between the lines. China's back. This book explains what you are dealing with today.
Jake
DK Whitsell
Temple University Japan
BA East Asian Studies, UM Asia

This is how you write a Chinese history book. The only thing this text suffers from nowadays is age. Save for that, you can expect a solid and palatable breakdown of Chinese history from it's beginnings up until roughly 1850. The book is well organized, starting with an overview of the general history of each specific time period, followed with additional information such as art, culture, and politics broken down into their own sections, making it easy to go back and read again, or reference a point from a specific topic.

As mentioned above, the text is outdated however, so any new findings post 1975 are obviously not going to be included. But this really isn't a weak point. The other significant issue is that the Chinese names are written in the old fashioned Wade-Giles system (as opposed to modern pinyin), so you may find yourself having to do a bit of "translation" if you're looking for additional information on names you come across in the text.

Overall though, an invaluable text for understanding Chinese history.
Bandiri
I know nothing of Chinese history. That's why I read this book. So I have no idea how accurate it is in all of its details. I can tell that it is outdated. It makes no mention of the First Emperor's terracotta army or any other developments post-1976. However, judging from the unsentimental and logical way it is written and the unreliability of several of the texts I've read since then it seems an entirely reliable book.

The book is rather unusually split in to three parts. The first part covers prehistory through the Warring States period, the second the Xin, Han, and Tang dynasties, and the third the Sung, Yuan, Ming, and Xing dynasties. I say unusual because Chinese history is usually spit up dynastically yet he groups several of them together because he sees a common style running through them. I can't say whether he's overstating the case or not, but his explanations seemed logical enough. Each of the three parts is divided up as well. There are chapters on narrative, government, society, thought, and literature. Each of these goes into about as much depth as is possible in an introductory text. There is a lot of information in here.

I have very little to say about this book since I haven't read much that it can be compared with. Having read histories from Communist states before I can be fairly certain that his book is a lot more reliable than a lot of works coming out of that era. I will say that I never really felt I understood how the Chinese government worked in practice despite several diagrams outlining the chain of command. Also, kept shoehorning western contacts in there whenever they popped up. I guess he thinks that this will attract the interest of western readers but at times these references seem irrelevant. But apart from that this book has a great deal to commend it. His early chapters make clear how much he attention he pays to archaeological data and there are several excellent pictures of stone age burial pits. I find that a lot of authors dealing with historical matters have trouble with archaeology and vice versa. Overall this book made me want to learn more about the Chinese and that's exactly the response you want to get from an introductory text. There may well be a better book out there by now but you could certainly do a lot worse than starting at this one.
Quellik
This book is clearly written and covers competently a broad range of topics. The author follows a topical format (as opposed to a strictly chronological) and discusses in turn general political history, social and political structures, intellectual life, arts and literature. All are described fairly well, though the coverage of some personalities is sketchy perhaps because of space limitations. But the author is clearly very knowledge and provides an adequate amount of critical analysis (in addition to the merely descriptive) so that one doesn't lose sight of the bigger picture.
Chuynopana
For me China is just a matter of personal interest - no academic or business motivation. What's the most interesting is to understand the foundations of culture, of social structures, customs and behaviours. With the organisation of this book I could easily pick up the pieces which I consider the most relevant. Having read quite a number of books on the subject I finally found the explanations of several intriguing aspects of Chinese culture, which in the other sources were presented in a "as a matter of fact" mode!
Lucam
Thanks

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