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by Richard Graham

  • ISBN: 0292723261
  • Category: History
  • Author: Richard Graham
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Other formats: azw rtf lrf lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press; First Edition edition (October 15, 2010)
  • Pages: 352 pages
  • FB2 size: 1698 kb
  • EPUB size: 1679 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 722
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Cover: Feeding the City. Latin American Studies: History. From Street Market to Liberal Reform in Salvador, Brazil, 1780–1860. This social and cultural history of the provisioning of Salvador, Brazil, as it moved from colony to independent city encompasses a whole society by looking at a broadly defined occupation-the food trade-and showing the connections between and among social categories. Series: Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Endowment in Latin American and Latino Art and Culture, Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Series in Latin American and Latino Art and Culture.

in Salvador, Brazil, 1780-1860 by Richard Graham (2010, Paperback) .

Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Series in Latin American and Latino Art and Culture: Feeding the City : From Street Market to Liberal Reform in Salvador, Brazil, 1780-1860 by Richard Graham (2010, Paperback). Best-selling in Non-Fiction. The boatmen who brought food to the city from across the bay decisively influenced the outcome of the war for Brazilian independence from Portugal by supplying the insurgents and not the colonial army.

Feeding the City book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Feeding the City: From Street Market to Liberal Reform in Salvador, Brazil, 1780-1860 (Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Series in Latin American and Latino Art and Culture) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Home Browse Books Book details, Feeding the City: From Street . In El Salvador, Obama Lauds Funes as a Model Central American Leader By Rogers, Tim The Christian Science Monitor, March 23, 2011.

Home Browse Books Book details, Feeding the City: From Street Market to Liberal. Feeding the City: From Street Market to Liberal Reform in Salvador, Brazil, 1780-1860. Richard Graham here shows for the first time that, far from being a city sharply and principally divided into two groups-the rich and powerful or the hapless poor or enslaved-Salvador had a population that included a great many who lived in between and moved up and down.

Therefore, we will analyze the set of changes and reforms that have taken place in the Brazilian electricity sector in the 1990s as markers of this hegemony construction process around the market-oriented reforms, agreed on the internal and external level. Feeding Dublin: The City Fruit and Vegetable Market. Samantha Martin-McAuliffe.

Salvador, Brazil-often called Bahia-was a major city in the Americas at the end of the eighteenth century. It invites inquiry not only into such a commercial network, but also into what its workings reveal about the city’s social makeup. Street sellers, boatmen, grocers, butchers, cattle dealers, importers; men and women; blacks, mulattos, and whites

Richard Graham offers a richly detailed portrait of the relationships of commerce, patronage, and regulation that . Using rich notarial and other archives, Graham describes the range of activities needed to feed the city.

Refuting stereotypes of a rigid caste system, he shows how the mundane but essential labor of slaves and freedmen and women afforded opportunities for economic and social advancement.

From Street Market to Liberal Reform in Salvador, Brazil, 1780–1860. University of Texas Press, Austin2010.

Winner, Bolton-Johnson Prize, Conference on Latin American History, 2011Murdo J. McLeod Book Prize, 2011

On the eastern coast of Brazil, facing westward across a wide magnificent bay, lies Salvador, a major city in the Americas at the end of the eighteenth century. Those who distributed and sold food, from the poorest street vendors to the most prosperous traders—black and white, male and female, slave and free, Brazilian, Portuguese, and African—were connected in tangled ways to each other and to practically everyone else in the city, and are the subjects of this book. Food traders formed the city's most dynamic social component during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, constantly negotiating their social place. The boatmen who brought food to the city from across the bay decisively influenced the outcome of the war for Brazilian independence from Portugal by supplying the insurgents and not the colonial army. Richard Graham here shows for the first time that, far from being a city sharply and principally divided into two groups—the rich and powerful or the hapless poor or enslaved—Salvador had a population that included a great many who lived in between and moved up and down.

The day-to-day behavior of those engaged in food marketing leads to questions about the government's role in regulating the economy and thus to notions of justice and equity, questions that directly affected both food traders and the wider consuming public. Their voices significantly shaped the debate still going on between those who support economic liberalization and those who resist it.


Reviews about Feeding the City: From Street Market to Liberal Reform in Salvador, Brazil, 1780–1860 (Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Series in Latin American and Latino Art and Culture) (3):
Kulalas
This is an incredibly detailed, well-written analysis of the lives and movements of the mainly Afro-Bahian women responsible for the delivery, preparation,and thus circulation of food in 19th C. Salvador, one of the Atlantic world's most important slave ports. As such it's a timely, creative approach to survival and to the roles of black women in the city's commerce.
HappyLove
Eh, ok. Kind of boring, had to read this for a class. It seems superfluous, but maybe thats just because I wasn't into it.
Anayanis
This is by far one of my favorite books I have ever read! Very fascinating detailed account of 19th century life in Bahia. Reading this book really made me want to travel there, so exciting :) Well done, sincerest compliments to the author! :)

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