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by Esmeralda Santiago

  • ISBN: 0306814528
  • Category: History
  • Author: Esmeralda Santiago
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Other formats: docx rtf mobi lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press; unknown edition (February 28, 2006)
  • Pages: 278 pages
  • FB2 size: 1673 kb
  • EPUB size: 1539 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 555
Download When I Was Puerto Rican: A Memoir (A Merloyd Lawrence Book) fb2

Esmeralda Santiago is the author of two other highly acclaimed memoirs, The Turkish Lover and Almost a Woman, which was made into a film for PBS's Masterpiece Theatre.

Esmeralda Santiago is the author of two other highly acclaimed memoirs, The Turkish Lover and Almost a Woman, which was made into a film for PBS's Masterpiece Theatre. She lives in Westchester County, New York.

Though "When I Was Puerto Rican" treats Esmeralda Santiago's life during the 1950s and 1960s, it has a timeless feel to it. Moving, illuminating and compelling, this memoir does much more than describe one girl's emerging. Moving, illuminating and compelling, this memoir does much more than describe one girl's emerging self; it invites us to explore our own past and examine the forces which have created our own identity. I bought the book a while ago, but just started reading it today and the pages are falling out. Poorly constructed and super annoying. I had purchased this book previously and did not have this issue with the other one.

When I Was Puerto Rican by Esmeralda Santiago. All Esmeralda Santiago books are must-reads. Cigar factories in Puerto Rico! Love and loss in Washington Heights! In time for Hispanic Heritage Month, a non-exhaustive list of Latino authors writing in English in the United States. When I Was Puerto Rican Lesson Plans include daily lessons, fun activities, essay topics, test/quiz questions, and more. Everything you need to teach When I Was Puerto Rican. Just finished Conquistadora and loved it. I will have to circle back around and read Esmeralda Santiago's memoir soon. 13 Latino Young Adult.

Get started today for free. All Documents from When I Was Puerto Rican: A Memoir (A Merloyd Lawrence Book). las 211 exam 1 terms 2014-03-13.

tropical beauty and domestic strife, poverty and tenderness, Esmeralda Santiago learned the proper way to eat a guava, the sound of tree frogs, the taste of morcilla, and the formula for ushering a dead baby's soul to heaven.

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Get free shipping from Target. In a childhood full of tropical beauty and domestic strife, poverty and tenderness, Esmeralda Santiago learned the proper way to eat a guava, the sound of tree frogs, the taste of morcilla, and the formula for ushering a dead baby's soul to heaven.

When I Was Puerto Rican By Esmeralda Santiago - Completely captures what it is like growing up in Puerto Rico.

One of "The Best Memoirs of a Generation" (Oprah's Book Club): a young woman's journey from the mango groves and barrios of Puerto Rico to Brooklyn, and eventually on to HarvardIn a childhood full of tropical beauty and domestic strife, poverty and tenderness, Esmeralda Santiago learned the proper way to eat a guava, the sound of tree frogs, the taste of morcilla, and the formula for ushering a dead baby's soul to heaven. But when her mother, Mami, a force of nature, takes off to New York with her seven, soon to be eleven children, Esmeralda, the oldest, must learn new rules, a new language, and eventually a new identity. In the first of her three acclaimed memoirs, Esmeralda brilliantly recreates her tremendous journey from the idyllic landscape and tumultuous family life of her earliest years, to translating for her mother at the welfare office, and to high honors at Harvard.
Reviews about When I Was Puerto Rican: A Memoir (A Merloyd Lawrence Book) (7):
Khiceog
One of the most difficult challenges facing a memoirist is the task of making her particular story resonate with universal truths. Esmeralda Santiago's "When I Was Puerto Rican" is a stunning success; it not only captures the dynamics of identity creation, does so in the context of ethnic, class and geographic tensions. Santiago's coming-of-age saga encompasses an incipient awareness of her unique status as an oldest daughter, conflicted thinker and anguished observer of family disintegration. That she writes without a drop of self-pity is remarkable given the abundance of sadness and betrayal which swirl in her story.
For much of her childhood in Puerto Rico and her early adolescence in New York City, Santiago lives a dual life. Possessed of a "stubborn pride," her "frightened self hid" behind a false veneer of acceptance that "everything was all right." At once proud and ashamed of her rural "jibaro" identity, Santiago grapples with exactly who and what she is. In this respect, "When I Was Puerto Rican" reverberates with the near-universal dynamic of identity creation, hidden shame at life's circumstances and constant questioning of how and why families created such tortured environments in which children evolve.
Plaguing Santiago is the ambiguous, tormented relationship between her mother and father. Exposed equally to the sounds of lovemaking and arguments, Santiago can neither be surprised that her parents never wed or the constant absence of her hard-working, poetic but irresponsible father. Eventually, the pressures of this quasi-marital status between Mami and Papi erupt, and Santiago saves her best writing for its description. As her mother and father savage each other in verbal warfare, "they growled words that made no sense." Their fighting echoes "all the hurts and insults, the dinners gone to waste, the women, the abandonments." As Santiago "crouched against the wall," she witnesses her parents "disfigure" themselves with anger. "In their passion Mami and Papi had forgotten" their children. They were real "only to one another." Santiago and her siblings cower in a corner, "afraid that if we left them, they might eat each other."
This authentic voice carries throughout the memoir as the author explores the various influences of her own existence. Nicknamed "Negi" by her parents due to her dark complexion, Santiago is acutely aware of her ethnicity and is perplexed upon her move to New York that people who look like her (African-Americans) have deep, unfounded suspicions about her and her people. As a Puerto Rican, she develops ambivalence about the United States and the American presence not only on her native island, but in her heart as well. How American will she become? At what cost? These are the same questions millions of immigrants have asked themselves as they immerse themselves in their new land. But how can she be "new" when Puerto Rico is and has been America for all of her life.
Though "When I Was Puerto Rican" treats Esmeralda Santiago's life during the 1950s and 1960s, it has a timeless feel to it. Moving, illuminating and compelling, this memoir does much more than describe one girl's emerging self; it invites us to explore our own past and examine the forces which have created our own identity.
Ferri - My name
Living in Hawaii my whole life, I have never experienced moving from on place to another. I have a few friends at school who have moved from either other islands or other states. But moving from a different country; that sounds a little to extreme. After reading When I was Puerto Rican, by Esmeralda Santiago, I have learned to apreciate my home more and life. Before reading the book, I used to put a side living in Hawaii, with a happy family and beautiful house.
Esmeralda Santiago recals her life as a young kid in Puerto Rico. As a child, she lived happily with her Mom,Dad and two sisters. As the story goes on, many problems show up through her family. One problem is, her parents are always constantly arguing about everything. Also her older brother Raymond gets a serious foot injury and is forced to go to New York where he undergoes surgery. This forces Esmeralda and her family to move to New York. She is forced to leave her home and all of her friends. Esmeralda hates life in her new home and saying that she misses San Juan and the peacefulness. She say, " There were more fights, more arguments, more yelling in the night,more long absences.Or when she said,"In the twenty on years that I lived with my mother, we moved at least twenty times." She describes her life in New york as if it were hell. She hated life and hated being caught in between her parents arguments.
In our day moving is common but still can have a negative affect on your life. For me, leaving my friends would be so sad and would scar my life. *SPOILER ALERT* However, Esmeralda overcomes all of her obstacles and becomes a successful graduate of Harvard.
I had some trouble staying focus in the beginning of the book because it was a little boring for me. But, as the book went on I enjoyed more and more and couldn't put it down. I recall reading 41 pages in one day. The book was that good and reminded me to be grateful for everything that I own and for my home.
fabscf
This is a wonderful book, evocative, poignant, joyful and sorrowful, and very clearly written. Reading it is a life-enhancing experience. As soon as I finished it, I bought a copy of its sequel, *Almost a Woman*, equally enthralling and offering insights into worlds both different from those of many of us, and yet utterly familiar as well. Santiago's depiction of her family and the complex and ever-changing relationships between its members brings everyone to life. Reading the two in conjunction is, if possible, even better than reading them separately.
Dranar
A trip down memory lane into the Puerto Rico of my aunts, which I remember well, even though it was already changing for me. Funny and sad especially as it describes the changing reality of those who could not see a future on the island but were surprised by the harsh reality of life in "los nuevayores". It is great to see how the author did not allow these obstacles to keep her from achieving her goals. Certainly a great example to set for all those who feel overwhelmed by the boulders in the road.
FEISKO
Very vivid picture of life in Puerto Rico. I live in a town that is nearly half Puerto Rican and I found this book added some perspective to my viewpoints. She struggled to adapt to the enforcement of the American Way in her homeland and witnessed her parents struggles as well.
I've also had the opportunity to meet and listen to Esmeralda Santiago. She is a fascinating woman.

After reading this and then Almost A Woman also by Esmeralda Santiago I have a newfound appreciation for any young person who comes to this country and tries to find their way.

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