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by Susan D. Gillespie

  • ISBN: 0816510954
  • Category: History
  • Author: Susan D. Gillespie
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Other formats: lrf doc txt lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press; 1St Edition edition (September 1, 1989)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • FB2 size: 1267 kb
  • EPUB size: 1385 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 689
Download The Aztec Kings: The Construction of Rulership in Mexica History fb2

SOCIALICULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 459 were preparatory to employment in the The Aztec Kings: The Construction of. .

SOCIALICULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 459 were preparatory to employment in the The Aztec Kings: The Construction of professional car-stealing operations that co- Rulership in Mexica History. Susan D. Cil- existed alongside the auto-repair shops that lespie.

A readable book for the general reader and for the expert. The Aztec Kings is a study of the nature of rulership, and as such it is a major contribution to the cross-cultural literature of st analysis of historical traditions. Prudence M. Rice, American Anthropologist.

The Aztec Kings book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Aztec Kings: The Construction of Rulership in Mexican History. by. Gillespie.

Susan D. Gillespie (born 1952) is an American academic anthropologist and archaeologist, noted for her .

As of 2009 Gillespie holds a position as professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Florida, Gainesville, USA, having also been associate chair of the department from 2003 until 2009.

Susan Gillespie focuses on the dynastic history of the Mexica of Tenochtitlan, whose stories reveal how the Aztecs used "history" to construct, elaborate, and reify ideas about the nature of rulership and the cyclical nature of the cosmos, and how they projected the Spanish conquest deep.

The Aztec Kings: The Construction of Rulership in Mexican History.

The Aztec Kings: The Construction of Rulership in Mexica History. Blaming Moteuczoma: The of the Aztec Conquest. Tucson: University of Arizona Press. 1989 Winner of the 1990 Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin Prize awarded by the American Society for Ethnohistory. Niwot: University Press of Colorado.

by Susan D. History in practice: ritual deposition at La Venta Complex A. SD Gillespie. Memory work: archaeologies of material practices, 109-36, 2008. Olmec thrones as ancestral altars: The two sides of power. University of Arizona Press, 1989. Rethinking ancient Maya social organization: replacing" lineage" with" house". American anthropologist 102 (3), 467-484, 2000. Eventful archaeology: the place of space in structural transformation. Material symbols: culture and economy in prehistory, 224-253, 1999.

Scholars have long viewed histories of the Aztecs either as flawed chronologies plagued by internal inconsistencies and intersource discrepancies or as legends that indiscriminately mingle reality with the supernatural. But this new work draws fresh conclusions from these documents, proposing that Aztec dynastic history was recast by its sixteenth-century recorders not merely to glorify ancestors but to make sense out of the trauma of conquest and colonialism.The Aztec Kings is the first major study to take into account the Aztec cyclical conception of time—which required that history constantly be reinterpreted to achieve continuity between past and present—and to treat indigenous historical traditions as symbolic statements in narrative form. Susan Gillespie focuses on the dynastic history of the Mexica of Tenochtitlan, whose stories reveal how the Aztecs used "history" to construct, elaborate, and reify ideas about the nature of rulership and the cyclical nature of the cosmos, and how they projected the Spanish conquest deep into the Aztec past in order to make history accommodate that event. By demonstrating that most of Aztec history is nonliteral, she sheds new light on Aztec culture and on the function of history in society. By relating the cyclical structure of Aztec dynastic history to similar traditions of African and Polynesian peoples, she introduces a broader perspective on the function of history in society and on how and why history must change.
Reviews about The Aztec Kings: The Construction of Rulership in Mexica History (2):
Leniga
I used this book as a resource while writing my Bachelors thesis. A real standalone in regards to the depth and relevance of the lineages documented through the book. A University level book more than pleasure reading. Very difficult to find.
Timberahue
Into every life some Susan D. Gillespie must fall. Dr. Gillespie has taken a pleasing sequence of "facts," of which before reading her monograph I was entirely and absolutely certain, and most thoroughly demolished them. I had for many years enjoyed the traditional account of Motechuzoma's (AKA Montezuma's) encounter with Cortes, in which Motechuzoma's seeming waffling was based on his belief that Cortes was the returned ruler/deity Quetzalcoatl. His belief, according to both the traditional account and many recent authors, was based on an ancient Aztec legend that Quetzalcoatl would return from the east on the day 1 Reed, the day of Cortes's arrival. There were, I had fondly believed, persuasive embellishments to this story to the effect that Quetzalcoatl was a bearded white man, and equally ancient stories of why Quetzalcoatl had left his royal residence in Tula, and on and on. Because of these ancient stories, it was easy to understand why Motecuhzoma did not crush Cortes, or at least attempt to do so, at the outset of the Conquest.
Unfortunately, Dr. Gillespie demonstrates that these helpfully explanatory "ancient legends" are, in fact, mid-to-late 16th Century B.S., whole-cloth inventions that satisfied the needs of both the conquered Aztecs and the conquering Spaniards. While she is about it, she also suggests that Motechuzoma II was probably in fact Motechuzoma I, and that the published sequence of Aztec kings is much more spiritually than factually correct. Indeed (for me, at least) she leaves the entire corpus of Aztec pre-Conquest ethnohistory in a shapeless, swirling mass of quantum uncertainty. Her conclusions suggest that no post-Conquest accounts can be trusted whatever; and there exist essentially no pre-Conquest accounts. One is left with archeology: the stones and shards and radio-carbon and little else.
I wish Dr. Gillespie's results could be discounted, but if they can be, it is not by me. She is equipped with a vast and seemingly unassailable background of knowledge of the published accounts, and her conclusions are convincingly and compellingly and oftenly elegantly presented.
The book is sometimes tough going for the general reader (e.g., me) because of its anthropological technicalities as well as the intrinsic difficulties presented by the jaw-breaking Nahuatl names. Dr. Gillespie assists a bit with the latter by putting a female symbol in front of the female names, which helps some. Despite the difficulties, the book is well worth the time and effort, but is revolutionary and even emotionally hazardous for those of us who are/were smug in our assumptions about the short-lived but fascinating empire of the Aztecs.

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