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by Gregg Olsen

  • ISBN: 0307238776
  • Category: History
  • Author: Gregg Olsen
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Other formats: mbr azw docx lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Broadway Books (March 28, 2006)
  • Pages: 401 pages
  • FB2 size: 1164 kb
  • EPUB size: 1550 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 547
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When the ’Shine resumed underground operations in December 1972, I hired out as a replacement for one of the guys who died in the fire. I can tell you The Deep Dark is as real as it gets.

In The Deep Dark, Gregg Olsen looks beyond the intensely suspenseful .

In The Deep Dark, Gregg Olsen looks beyond the intensely suspenseful story of the fire and rescue to the wounded heart of Kellogg, a quintessential company town that has never recovered from its loss. A vivid and haunting chapter in the history of working-class America, this is one of the great rescue stories of the twentieth century. Gregg Olsen is the author of seven nonfiction books, including the New York Times bestsellerAbandoned Prayers. A journalist and investigative author for more than two decades, Olsen has received numerous awards and much critical acclaim for his writing.

In telling the suspenseful, gripping story of the 1972 Sunshine Mine disaster in which 91 silver miners were killed, Olsen looks .

In telling the suspenseful, gripping story of the 1972 Sunshine Mine disaster in which 91 silver miners were killed, Olsen looks beyond the story of the fire. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Overview: On May 2, 1972, 174 miners entered Sunshine Mine on their daily quest for silver. Aboveground, safety engineer Bob Launhardt sat in his office, filing his usual mountain of federal and state paperwork. From his office window he could see the air shafts that fed fresh air into the mine, more than a mile below the surface. The air shafts usually emitted only tiny coughs of exhaust; unlike dangerously combustible coal mines, Sunshine was a fireproof hardrock mine, nothing but cold, dripping wet stone. There were many safety concerns at Sunshine, but fire wasn’t one of them.

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Dark : Disaster and Redemption in America's Richest Silver Mine .

The Deep Dark : Disaster and Redemption in America's Richest Silver Mine. Gregg Olsen's book gave me a real insight into what my family had gone through. His "real time" story telling put you right in the moment. There were 3 tragic events that were most responsible in the development of the mine safety laws in America today, the Farmington mine explosion in West Virginia, the Scotia mine explosions in Kentucky, and the Sunshine mine fire in Idaho. This book should be required reading for mine managers, rescuers and regulators.

The Deep Dark: Disaster and Redemption in America’s Richest Silver Mine

The Deep Dark: Disaster and Redemption in America’s Richest Silver Mine. Starvation Heights: A True Story of Murder and Malice in the Woods of the Pacific Northwest. Cruel Deception: A Mother’s Deadly Game, a Prosecutor’s Crusade for Justice. If Loving You Is Wrong: The Shocking True Story of Mary Kay Letourneau. I hold the Snoqualmie card in my hand and remember the time that all the machines came through when I really needed it. I’d been put on administrative leave at the homicide unit and decided that it was time to remodel the kitchen. Who does that? Someone in deep denial, that’s who.

May 21, 2005, The Deep Dark: Disaster and Redemption in America's . The Deep Dark' Chronicles Deadly 1972 Mine Fire.

May 21, 2005, The Deep Dark: Disaster and Redemption in America's Richest Silver Mine tells the story of a deadly fire in Idaho's Sunshine Mine in May 1972. Scott Simon talks with author Gregg Olsen. Excerpt: The Deep Dark.

The Deep Dark: Disaster and Redemption in America's Richest Silver Mine tells the story of a deadly fire in Idaho's . For one thing, as you say, silver mines, at least this one, were a lot deeper than I think a lot of us know.

The Deep Dark: Disaster and Redemption in America's Richest Silver Mine tells the story of a deadly fire in Idaho's Sunshine Mine in May 1972. Mr. OLSEN: Coal mines are what really are frame of reference usually when we think about mining in this country and they're not that deep. You know, they're hundreds, maybe a thousand feet deep down. But in the silver mines of the Couer d'Alenes, which is in northern Idaho, some of them go as deep as 9,000 feet, and that's astonishing when you think about it.

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Author:-Olsen, Gregg.

For nearly a century, Kellogg, Idaho, was home to America’s richest silver mine, Sunshine Mine. Mining there, as everywhere, was not an easy life, but regardless of the risk, there was something about being underground, the lure of hitting a deep vein of silver. The promise of good money and the intense bonds of friendship brought men back year after year. Mining is about being a man and a fighter in a job where tomorrow always brings the hope of a big score. On May 2, 1972, 174 miners entered Sunshine Mine on their daily quest for silver. Aboveground, safety engineer Bob Launhardt sat in his office, filing his usual mountain of federal and state paperwork. From his office window he could see the air shafts that fed fresh air into the mine, more than a mile below the surface. The air shafts usually emitted only tiny coughs of exhaust; unlike dangerously combustible coal mines, Sunshine was a fireproof hardrock mine, nothing but cold, dripping wet stone. There were many safety concerns at Sunshine, but fire wasn’t one of them. The men and the company swore the mine was unburnable, so when thick black smoke began pouring from one of the air shafts, Launhardt was as amazed as he was alarmed. When the alarm sounded, less than half of the dayshift was able to return to the surface. The others were trapped underground, too deep in the mine to escape. Scores of miners died almost immediately, frozen in place as they drilled, ate lunch, napped, or chatted. No one knew what was burning or where the smoke had come from. But in one of the deepest corners of the mine, Ron Flory and Tom Wilkinson were left alone and in total darkness, surviving off a trickle of fresh air from a borehole. The miners’ families waited and prayed, while Launhardt, reeling from the shock of losing so many men on his watch, refused to close up the mine or give up the search until he could be sure that no one was left underground.In The Deep Dark, Gregg Olsen looks beyond the intensely suspenseful story of the fire and rescue to the wounded heart of Kellogg, a quintessential company town that has never recovered from its loss. A vivid and haunting chapter in the history of working-class America, this is one of the great rescue stories of the twentieth century.From the Hardcover edition.
Reviews about The Deep Dark: Disaster and Redemption in America's Richest Silver Mine (7):
Yayrel
This is excellent scholarship. Straight up.

1. The author tracks roughly 200 characters over the course of about 7 days. It is not a small task to keep them straight and continue to give the readers reminders of who is who, especially since some of the men and women he follows share names.

2. The author never shies away from the reality of the 1970s in North Idaho, which were the last bastion of the wild west. He doesn't make any bones about the fact that some of the miners died were not good men by the standards of their own day, let alone our day. When speaking of the dead it's hard to call a spade and spade, but he does.

3. The author also never shies away from pointing fingers where they need pointing. Again, writing about a tragedy when some of the survivors are still alive is bound to create some friction, and this author wades right into the fight (though he's got his bias, and that's fine with me -- he makes a hell of a case for his outlook.

3b. He also doesn't shield the reader from the sometimes grotesue realities of working underground or worse yet, dying down there.

4. It would be easy to make this book into an environmental treatise, or an excuse to demonize industry. It would probably popularize the book, but the author doesn't sell out. A stance, taken early in the book is that which can't be grown has to be mined. Humans want or need metals. Taking them out of the ground is a honest job. It's our responsibly as a society to make it as safe as can be.

After reading an awful lot of 'history' which is more re-constructionist drivel framed around what you might call a sympathetic agenda, it's nice to see this - honest and hard hitting without pandering to the audience.
Maveri
So Interesting. I live in nearby Sandpoint and only recently was made aware of the Sunshine Mine disaster. I found this book very interesting in the beginning, but after awhile, there are simply too many characters to follow. And not knowing much about mines, I found it a bit of a challenge to envision what a shaft, a drift, a stope, etc were. But I think I got the jist of it. I really loved all the personal stories the best. After awhile the mineshaft jargon got hard to follow.....but then the personal stories returned and I kept reading. The last third of the book picks up steam again, and gets exciting to read again. Some reviewers say the descriptions of the dead men in the mine were too gruesome. I found that part of the book fascinating, its really something you dont think about, and it makes you really angry that this happened to these poor guys. The two guys that survived, well, thats just a miracle.
Windbearer
A very tragic story, well told. In May 1972, a fire broke out in a silver mine in Idaho. Many lives were lost and the telling of the story takes you right there into the mine with those men. You almost hold your breath trying to imagine the fear and panic as they tried to breath, trying to use respirators that worked poorly, if at all. I highly recommend this for people who like nonfiction and history. A previous book by the same author, Starvation Heights, got me to try this book and I would conclude after reading both, that this is a very talented author who does his research meticulously. The mining industry was forever changed after this disaster, and you are left wondering how many these changes might have saved had these been in place. You will be on the edge of your seats, along with the families camped outside for over a week, wondering if anyone at all survived.
A quote from the book really says it all:
"Hope seldom wins over truth".
I did find it hard to keep track of all the miners, as the number killed was staggering. It might have helped to have a map with the names showing what levels they were on, as the mine had multiple levels and shafts for leaving and entering the mine. Overall I would give it a 4.5.
Mardin
A thoroughly researched book about a little-known tragedy that killed more than 90 silver miners in the Idaho mountains, a world so alien to the rest of us, it might as well be the dark side of the moon. The Dark Deep also exposes the unstable fault lines in a community and an industry that has more in common with the reckless and unregulated 19th century than today's world. The miners and their women are hard-drinking, hard-working, hard-living, surviving mostly from paycheck to paycheck, slaves to their own macho culture. At best, the company managers and profit-mad owners are incompetent and uncaring, given the inhumane and unsafe conditions a mile underground; criminal at worst. Courage, disaster and heartbreak overflowing, no redemption I can discern
The book unfolds chronologically, a "tick-tock" in the journalism business, but there is no omniscient POV expressed and the reader is hard-pressed to keep track of all the players, which can be frustrating, but nonetheless worth the effort.
Coiriel
My father worked in the Sunshine Mine in the Coeur d' Alene mining district at the time of this catastrophe. He and my brother were on their way to work when the fire occurred and were never in danger but some names of old school mates were familiar. A very personal reason for wanting to add this book to my library .
Ueledavi
I read Deep Down Dark, but found it was to technical, and to be honest, boring!!! By the second half I was almost read to put it down, but kept reading, because not finishing a book is something I just won't do.
A few weeks later I saw The Deep Dark on Amazon, and thought I would give it a try. Well, what a great read! You really get to know the miners and their families, and all the awful pain they must have been going through.
Rivik
This horrific tragedy happened in my state. I remember it clearly. It was written well and factual from the view of a company man. He also was very caring man. There is another book written from the experiences of working miners called "The Price of Silver". It was also very well written. You can feel the heartbreak of the families in the daily vigil in the cold. It explores the lives and families and miners. This also makes "The Silver Valley" the most historical area of Idaho. It was a very overwhelming to read.

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