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by Ian Williams

  • ISBN: 1560256516
  • Category: History
  • Author: Ian Williams
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Other formats: lrf azw lrf txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Nation Books (July 7, 2005)
  • Pages: 328 pages
  • FB2 size: 1263 kb
  • EPUB size: 1548 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 850
Download Rum: A Social and Sociable History of the Real Spirit of 1776 fb2

Ian Williams describes in captivating detail how Rum and the molasses that it was made from was to the 18th century .

Ian Williams describes in captivating detail how Rum and the molasses that it was made from was to the 18th century what oil is today. I recommend this book for anyone who is interested in learning more about Rum's history, or would like to read a different perspective concerning the exploration on the New World. Mr. Williams manages to take what can be a dry or uncomfortable subject and offers it with an honesty that is bound to make the more politically correct or revisionist squirm. I personally found this enjoyable and am happy to have this book as part of my library. To make it, they regularly traded with the enemy French during the Seven Years' War, angering their British masters and setting themselves on the road to Revolution. The regular flow of rum was essential to keeping both armies in the field since soldiers relied on rum to keep up their fighting spirits.

Ian Williams' book triumphantly restores rum's rightful place in history, taking us across space and time, from its .

Ian Williams' book triumphantly restores rum's rightful place in history, taking us across space and time, from its origins in the plantations of Barbados through Puritan and Revolutionary New England, to voodoo rites in modern Haiti, where to mix rum with Coke risks invoking the wrath of the god, and across the Florida straits where Fidel and the Bacardi family are still. Feb 23, 2013 Danielle rated it liked it.

Электронная книга "Rum: A Social and Sociable History of the Real Spirit of 1776", Ian Williams. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Rum: A Social and Sociable History of the Real Spirit of 1776" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

IAN WILLIAMS: This was the oil of the 18th century, ye.

IAN WILLIAMS: This was the oil of the 18th century, yes. It was liquidity, in every sense. AMY GOODMAN: And in a nutshell, how it’s made? IAN WILLIAMS: What you do, you take sugarcane, the juices from the sugarcane or the molasses left over after you’ve crystallized it - either will do - and you distill it. You ferment it, and then you distill it. And that gives a much more complex sort of set of mixture in the distillation than you get from whiskey or brandy.

Ian Williams's book-as biting and multilayered as the drink itself-triumphantly restores rum's rightful place in. .Telling photographs are also featured in this barnstorming history of the real "Spirit of 1776.

Ian Williams's book-as biting and multilayered as the drink itself-triumphantly restores rum's rightful place in history, taking us across space and time, from the slave plantations of seventeenth-century Barbados (the undisputed birthplace of rum) through Puritan and revolutionary New England, to voodoo rites in modern Haiti, where to mix rum with Coke risks invoking the wrath of the gods. He also depicts the showdown between the Bacardi family and Fidel Castro over the control of the lucrative rights to the Havana Club label.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 8. % restored. Главная Rum: A Social and Sociable History of the Real Spirit of 1776

The Nation's Williams (Deserter: Bush's War on Military Families) offers a spirited-if rambling-discussion of the history and spread of rum, from the field-side stills of 17th-century Barbados to the scientifically calibrated factories of modern multinationals like Bacardi

The Nation's Williams (Deserter: Bush's War on Military Families) offers a spirited-if rambling-discussion of the history and spread of rum, from the field-side stills of 17th-century Barbados to the scientifically calibrated factories of modern multinationals like Bacardi.

The book is filled with juicy anecdotes and tales. You will have a new respect for rum after reading this amusing and enlightening book. Teen and Young Adult. Literature & Fiction. Mystery & Thriller.

Cheap Rum: A Social and Sociable History of the Real Spirit of 1776,You can get more details about Rum: A Social and Sociable History of the Real Spirit of 1776:Shopping Guide on Alibaba. Williams details the mechanics of the pre-Revolutionary triangles of trade: African slaves for the Caribbean sugarcane plantations were purchased with rum distilled in New England from Caribbean molasses. Williams may oversimplify things by attributing the cause of the American Revolution to New England molasses smugglers, but his product-based interpretation of history will appeal to readers of similar books on cod, sugar, and salt.

Rum arguably shaped the modern world. It was to the eighteenth century what oil is to the present, but its significance has been diminished by a misguided sense of old-fashioned morality dating back to Prohibition. In fact, Rum shows that even the Puritans took a shot now and then. Rum, too, was one of the major engines of the American Revolution, a fact often missing from histories of the era.Ian Williams’s book—as biting and multilayered as the drink itself—triumphantly restores rum’s rightful place in history, taking us across space and time, from the slave plantations of seventeenth-century Barbados (the undisputed birthplace of rum) through Puritan and revolutionary New England, to voodoo rites in modern Haiti, where to mix rum with Coke risks invoking the wrath of the gods. He also depicts the showdown between the Bacardi family and Fidel Castro over the control of the lucrative rights to the Havana Club label. Telling photographs are also featured in this barnstorming history of the real "Spirit of 1776."
Reviews about Rum: A Social and Sociable History of the Real Spirit of 1776 (7):
Ariseym
If I could have, I would have given this 2-1/2 stars -- but I couldn't really give it three. This is a period of history and a topic I have studied at some length, and while there were some interesting facts and solid quotes, there are enough errors that I would never consider picking anything up to use in a lecture without checking at least one other source. A couple of examples: he attributes the Coffey still to Andreas Coffey, but it's Aeneas Coffey. Kind of an amateur mistake. More problematic is the author's snarkiness in many places, which is compounded by being wrong -- such as when he quotes a satirical poem by William Cowper, stating that the poem demonstrates Cowper's approval of slavery (or, as the author states it, "he struggled with his conscience and lost"). Cowper was an abolitionist who wrote the satirical poem at the request of William Wilberforce -- the man who fought slavery his whole life and eventually got slavery banned throughout the British empire. To have attributed to Cowper a pro-slavery stance based on this satire (which laments that one would have to live without sugar and rum if slavery were ended) makes me wonder how many other things he may have misinterpreted.

So I'd suggest that, if you really know this topic and want some new facts (though you'd want to double check them), this is a good source, especially of lengthy quotes from a handful of early rum and Caribbean historians. However, if you only care enough to read one book, I'd definitely recommend William Curtis's "And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in 10 Cocktails" over this book -- it's more accurate and it's a much more entertaining read.
Nahelm
This book is a quick, interesting and fun read. It is, as the title suggests, the story of rum - the invention of rum, the manufacture of rum, and the place of rum in world history and culture.

There is a surprisingly large amount of information to be had here, and it is presented by the author in a tongue-in-cheek, bantering style which makes it easy to remember and to connect with many other points of reference. You'll learn all about `kill devil', `scuttlebutt', `Nelson's blood', and then be overcome with the urge to wash down the lesson with a shot of `Barbadoes waters' as you contemplate the grog ration, and how Britannia actually came to rule the waves.

Like coffee, chocolate, tea, opium, sugar, methamphetamines and tobacco, rum is a product for which there is great demand -a craving no less- and that demand creates all sorts of consequences-it becomes a great driver of human events, for both good and ill. The by-product of Jamaican sugar refining is molasses, which is distilled in New England to make rum, which is shipped to West Africa as a trade good in exchange for slaves, who are taken to Jamaica to cultivate sugar cane...

If you want to learn more about subjects as diverse as the drinking habits of our Founding Fathers and why they were indebted to medieval Arabian alchemists, or the triple scourges of `Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion' (to say nothing of `Rum, Buggery and The Lash'),or the pirates of the Caribbean, or the one and only quality export coming out of Haiti these days, or what those fifteen men were up to, you really should pick this book up today.
Sharpbrew
Ian Williams "Rum: A Social and Sociable History" chronicles the birth of Rum in the new world and its global impact to modern day political maneuvering. Mr. Williams offers the reader an uncut and honest accounting of the events surrounding the rise and fall of the triangle trade, prohibition, as well as the modern rum market circa 2005. I particularly enjoyed where he reintroduced details that others chose to omit or modify to promote their own sociopolitical agenda. From Washington to Kennedy I promise you will either learn something new or be reminded of a fact that others tend to shy away from.

I recommend this book for anyone who is interested in learning more about Rum's history, or would like to read a different perspective concerning the exploration on the New World. Mr. Williams manages to take what can be a dry or uncomfortable subject and offers it with an honesty that is bound to make the more politically correct or revisionist squirm. I personally found this enjoyable and am happy to have this book as part of my library.
unmasked
I purchased this to do some research on the topic of alcohol and rum-running. This was a good resource of information. The book covers many years and eras from the American Revolution to the West Indian trade.

The only downside is that it may have been a little dry at times, but the book is more a victim of its genre than the author.
Sataxe
What a great little book...easy to read, funny as hell, full of sarcasm. The author makes light of the stupidity, greed, and charlatanism of the times....everyone was in on it and no one gave a damn about the consequences....

Hey wait a minute...that sounds like our governments today!
Undeyn
A good read...make connections between slavery and other economic acdtivities like the New England fishing industry to the Rum Trade...makes connection between Rum and the social fabric of the American Colonies...an easy and fun read for anybody interested in American History.
Frlas
Don't bother. Cobbled together information you can find on-line.
Good information about the history of rum. However, the reader must try to seperate the facts from the author's opinions about everything from the tastes of various rums to the causes of recent and historical events.

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