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by Samuel Hynes

  • ISBN: 0816147035
  • Category: History
  • Author: Samuel Hynes
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Other formats: docx lrf lrf mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: G K Hall & Co; Large Print edition (April 1, 1989)
  • Pages: 321 pages
  • FB2 size: 1901 kb
  • EPUB size: 1687 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 881
Download Flights of Passage: Reflections of a World War II Aviator (G K Hall Large Print Book Series) fb2

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Samuel Hynes served as a consultant on The War, directed and produced by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, and .

Samuel Hynes is Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature Emeritus at Princeton University and the . Hynes's wartime experiences as a Marine Corps pilot were the basis for his highly praised memoir, Flights of Passage.

Samuel Hynes is Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature Emeritus at Princeton University and the author of several major works of literary criticism, including The Auden Generation, Edwardian Occasions, and The Edwardian Turn of Mind. The Soldiers' Tale, his book about soldiers' narratives of the two world wars and Vietnam, won a Robert F. Kennedy Award. He is also a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

Flights of Passage book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Flights of Passage: Reflections of a World War II Aviator as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Flights of Passage: Reflections of a World War II Aviator as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

HYNES, SAMUEL (Author) Frederic C. Beil (Publisher). Administrative reflections from World War II. Books. Related content. Over two million American servicemen passed through Britain during the Second World War. In 1944, at the height of activity, up to half a million were based there with the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF). Their job was to man and maintain the vast fleets of aircraft needed to attack German cities and industry. Imperial War Museums home Connect with IWM.

World War II is sometimes thought of as primarily a fight against Nazi Germany, with the war in the . Fortunately, there is no shortage of worthwhile books about the Pacific War. 6. "Flights of Passage: Reflections of a World War II Aviator," by Samuel Hynes.

World War II is sometimes thought of as primarily a fight against Nazi Germany, with the war in the Pacific as an after-thought. Among the many young Americans who found themselves fighting in the Pacific was 18-year old Samuel Hynes from Minnesota who became a Marine pilot and flew more than 100 missions.

Teenager Hynes (now Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature, Princeton) took naval flight training, became a Marine bomber pilot, and late in World War II flew over 100 missions against the Japanese. His scintillating descriptions of this time, of his friends and often bawdy fellow pilots, of his tentative romantic adventures, and of new vistas and challenges, are woven together with skill and intelligence.

I didn't discover this book until around 2003, I think it was. I'd just read Hynes' other memoir, The Growing Seasons, and wanted to know what happened next.

Professor Hynes’s books Flights of Passage: Reflections of a World War II Aviator (1988), a memoir, and The Soldiers’ Tale: Bearing Witness to Modern War (1997), a study of memoirs, diaries and other writing about war, delivered civilians to body-strewn battlefields and rat-infested trenches.

Professor Hynes’s books Flights of Passage: Reflections of a World War II Aviator (1988), a memoir, and The Soldiers’ Tale: Bearing Witness to Modern War (1997), a study of memoirs, diaries and other writing about war, delivered civilians to body-strewn battlefields and rat-infested trenches to answer the essential question, he wrote in The New York Times.

reflections of a World War II aviator. Sam Hynes was eighteen when he left his Minnesota home for navy flight school in 1943. Hall large print book series. Large print ed. by Samuel Hynes. Published 1989 by . Hall in Boston, Mass. By the time the war ended he was a veteran Marine pilot, still not quite twenty-one, and had flown more than a hundred missions in the Pacific theater.

Book by Hynes, Samuel
Reviews about Flights of Passage: Reflections of a World War II Aviator (G K Hall Large Print Book Series) (7):
Moralsa
My father was an Army Air Corps pilot during WWII so I've often picked up books about fighter pilots and their experiences in the Second World War. Samuel Hynes's Flights of Passage is one of the best. Hynes didn't see much combat and doesn't pretend to be a "war hero." But his self-effacing style and beautiful writing make this book a classic. If you're looking for a combat memoir, I'd recommend First Light by Geoffrey Wellum. This is more of a coming-of-age tale, but a well-told one, and well worth reading.
Sha
Hynes has the credentials of an excellent writer, and I enjoyed his previous autobiographical book which covered his early life in Minnesota. Although this covers his flight training and combat as a dive bomber pilot during WWII, it is not a typical fighter pilot war story. Rather, he focuses on his maturation from his teens to his early twenties while in the wartime environment. I enjoyed his "reflections" on these years. It's one of the few books I've read which discusses the boredom which can impact the pilot's life even with frequent combat sorties. It was a good read.
Skyway
wonderful condition
GawelleN
Disappointing, though mainly because author, contrary to implications of title, never saw much aerial combat.
Therefore his narrative and outlook were affected accordingly.
I had a challenging time making it to the end.
Voodoosida
This is an insightful, open and honest account of a Marine bomber pilot-- from the time he entered service until his eventual discharge. It speaks to the entire experience-- not just the combat. I just read this book for the second time, and found it to be even better second time around.

Sorry, have to disagree with what others have said about his not seeing much combat. He saw PLENTY of combat, and had several of his friends killed in action. Navy single engine bomber pilots were flying large, powerful, heavily armored and rather cumbersome planes with crew members-- and they were tasked with dive bombing as a group, putting "ordinance" (a military term for "bombs") precisely on target, and in most cases while the enemy was shooting large caliber weapons at them in the dive. No, he wasn't in the battles for the Solomon Islands, wasn't in the battle of Midway, wasn't at Iwo Jima or Tarawa-- but he was in one mother of a battle called "Okinawa" (which had over 50,000 American casualties), as well as significant combat patrols, anti submarine patrols and missions to nearby islands held by the Japanese. He received TWO distinguished flying crosses and saw more than enough for anyone's lifetime.

What's particularly interesting to me in this book are all of the opportunities for pilots to get killed outside of combat or the long periods leading up to combat. He lost friends that were killed in primary training and transition training- friends that were killed in "routine" patrols-- friends who were killed when the weather closed in, and they were simply never heard from again, and friends that died as a result of equipment failure. And yes, friends that were killed in combat-- including two of his closest friends. Some real heartache felt at the end of the book in particular as he circled the crash site of one of his closest friends, who with his crew was killed while dive bombing a target about a month before the war suddenly ended.

Dr. Hines knows how to write. He became the Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature at Princeton University and published other works that have won him several awards-- including a 1977 Fellowship of the Royal Society of Literature. His writing, in my opinion, was flawless. Superb.

I like books that provide personal accounts by ordinary people who lived during well known events. And this book provides just that. An insightful look at the entire process, and a reflective look about surviving World War II while in uniform.

If you're looking for heroics, and lots of rah rah, this won't be your book. But if you're looking for an honest account about what it was like for these men to put their lives on the line- and to learn about the real lives of military pilots during World War II-- read this book. The title says it all-- "Reflections" of a World War II Aviator. He clearly digs deep into his memory-- and his flight logbooks-- to remember many, many interesting details from the past. Details that won't be found from anything other than an honest autobiographical account.

Oh, and if you like this book and are looking for something just as good, try Edwards Park's excellent book "Nanette: Her Pilot's Love Story", which is even better than this little jewel, or Richard C. Kirkland's "Tales of a War Pilot." I believe these three books to be some of the best written about World War II aviation, because of their honest approach. Three different pilots, three different perspectives. Three excellent books.
Ceroelyu
Samuel Hynes belonged to that generation of American males who were thrust into the maelstrom of World War 2, straight from high school. By the time he was old enough and eligible to join the Marines, the requirement that all pilots must have 2 years of college education had been dropped. So, at 19, he entered flight school and wound up as a dive bomber pilot in the Pacific.

Pilots are often brash, loud, and cocky. Hynes was different. He went through the training, and through the war, with an introspective attitude, sensitive to the danger he encountered every day, and with a genuine concern and sorrow over his friends that were killed in training or in combat. Another very refreshing feature in a wartime memoir is the way Hynes admits to the insecurities he experienced over alcohol and women.

He takes you through the routine of flying to the target and the sheer terror he experienced during the bombing run, and how he tried to get his racing heart to relax when he found he was once again safe to fly home. As a Professor of English in later life, his prose is very eloquent, yet never over-polished or forced, and his description of the union between man and airplane is nothing short of lyrical.

I recommend this to any fan of wartime aviation, especially those who have read all the fighter jock memoirs (such as Tom Blackburn, Pappy Boyington, or the books of Eric Hammel). This book sheds light on the often spurned team of pilots, the dive bombers, better than any other I have encountered.

-Heikki Hietala, author of Tulagi Hotel
Akinozuru
Candid, elitist(from a commissioned marine flyer) perspective on war in the Pacific. Often reads like the frat house goes to war. Let's drink all night and fly in the morning. His reflections on his crew, never saw them except when flying, never shared a meal and disparaged them with his comment about how they rode in the back, probably reading their comic books. accurately forecast his future role as a professor at Princeton. WW2 in the Pacific was ugly, often boring with moments of terror but it was clearly better to be a marine pilot than a doggie, or a crunchie as they called the ground troops. More personal and realistic counterpoint than Ambrose's book, The Wild Blue, about the men and boys that flew bombers in Europe.

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