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by Archer Jones

  • ISBN: 0029166357
  • Category: History
  • Author: Archer Jones
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Other formats: lrf azw txt mobi
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Free Press; First Edition edition (March 16, 1992)
  • Pages: 338 pages
  • FB2 size: 1117 kb
  • EPUB size: 1574 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 121
Download Civil War Command And Strategy: The Process Of Victory And Defeat fb2

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In this comparative history of Union & Confederate command & strategy, Jones shows us how the Civil War was actually conducted

In this comparative history of Union & Confederate command & strategy, Jones shows us how the Civil War was actually conducted. Looking at decision-making at the highest levels, Jones argues that President Lincoln & Davis & most of their senior generals brought to the context of the Civil War a broad grasp of established mil. strategy & its historical applications, as well as the ability to make significant strategic innovations.

Civil War command and strategy : the process of victory and defeat/Archer Jones.

In this comparative history of Union & Confederate command & strategy, Jones shows us how the Civil War was actually conducted. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Publisher. Civil War command and strategy : the process of victory and defeat/Archer Jones. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Archer Jones's book Civil War Command and Strategy breaks the war down into its elemental strategic pieces .

Archer Jones's book Civil War Command and Strategy breaks the war down into its elemental strategic pieces and analyzes and explains the how and why the Civil War was fought the way it was. By breaking the process of victory and defeat down into several important themes Jones destroys many common misguided beliefs and puts the war into a proper perspective that is not clouded by anachronism. When I teach the Civil War to my 8th grade students I find that I am guilty of unjustly criticizing many union and confederate generals for being too cautious, stupid, ignorant, or foolhardy

In this comparative history of Union & Confederate command & strategy, Jones shows us how the Civil War . This being said, I would still recommend this book, it's a good read on the background d of the strategy and tactics of those who had the burden of conducting the civil war. strategy & its historical a In this comparative history of Union & Confederate command & strategy, Jones shows us how the Civil War was actually conducted.

Jones analyzes the conduct of the American Civil War. He argues that Presidents Lincoln and Davis, and their Generals, showed a firm grasp of established military strategy as well as an ability to innovate.

Here, Jones (History/North Dakota State Univ. The Art of War in the Western World, 1987) expands on the major ideas in his essay in Gabor S. Boritt's Why the Confederacy Lost (p. 151). CIVIL WAR COMMAND AND STRATEGY: The Process of Victory and Defeat.

The Process Of Victory And Defeat. In this comparative history of Union & Confederate command & strategy, Jones shows us how the Civil War was actually conducted. Books related to Civil War Command And Strategy.

Corporate Name: United States. Army History Civil War, 1861-1865. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Corporate Name: Confederate States of America. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Civil War command and strategy : the process of victory and defeat, Archer Jones.

Compares the wartime strategies of the high command of the Union and Confederate Armies
Reviews about Civil War Command And Strategy: The Process Of Victory And Defeat (6):
Umge
I was disappointed. The author is a well known authority on the Civil War, but I found this to me primarily a chaapter by chapter chronolgical survey of the Civil War built around a description of the strategy. Turning movements, concentration in time and space, raids -- I didn't think this book added much to the discussion.
BlackHaze
My son has wanted this book for a long time, glad we found it!
Hra
The title of my review is a quote (or close approximation of) from the great German strategist General Helmuth von Moltke (the elder) as his description and dismissal of the American Civil War. Military history and military history gaming being my main hobbies, I often run into folks who have the same opinion, as did I from what little I learned about the war from highschool and college "history" courses. Once I later started serious reading of the topic I came to change my mind, and when I read "Civil War Command And Strategy" some years ago the pieces fell into place for me. Yes, individual leaders were incompetent (and even the best made mistakes at times, as even the best generals throughout history have done), and the early war armies were largely composed of barely trained enlistees, but from the start there were people in place, both leaders and a core of veterans from prior wars, with experience and the right "plans". They only lacked the material to carry them out and also needed to learn to adapt to the new technologies available in 1861. Not all did, but by 1864 both sides were largely composed of well lead, well trained and well equipped armies using operational and strategic methods that any of the "great captains" of history would have approved of.

My only real complaints are about the author's writing style as he tends to restate himself often and that the illustrations provided are very lacking. He is also not writing for a general audience -- his target audience is folks with a knowledge of military history in general. Also, he expects the reader to be at least somewhat familiar with the ACW in particular, since his main theme is to try to change the perceptions many have about the conduct of this war, particularly how Lincoln and Davis learned to become effective leaders of their sides despite the handicaps of fighting a war that was so tightly coupled with the political ramifications their actions would have with the legislators and public opinion.
Kulwes
Archer Jones's book Civil War Command and Strategy breaks the war down into its elemental strategic pieces and analyzes and explains the how and why the Civil War was fought the way it was. By breaking the process of victory and defeat down into several important themes Jones destroys many common misguided beliefs and puts the war into a proper perspective that is not clouded by anachronism.

When I teach the Civil War to my 8th grade students I find that I am guilty of unjustly criticizing many union and confederate generals for being too cautious, stupid, ignorant, or foolhardy. That is because I did not look at their situation from their perspective. I was guilty of applying modern standards of war to their actions. By following Jones's contention that "by grounding [my] understanding of the war in the art of war as the participants knew it, this work of military history adopts a good vantage point for understanding and evaluating their performance." Through this boo I have developed a new found respect and understanding for many civil war commanders who previously earned by contempt. In addition, Jones's book addressed many of the common civil war clichés found in textbooks and narratives that fail to address the reality of the war: the effect of the blockade, the impact of the extended range of the rifles, the poor supply of the confederate troops, the damage of states rights, and the general incompetence of the generals all seem to need a thorough reworking.

Jones reworks these beliefs throughout his book by addressing the war in a chronological manner and assigning each phase of it a different theme. A dominate theme of Jones throughout the book is the relative equality of both sides. From the presidents to the troops the war was more a battle of doppelgangers than unique adversaries. Despite Davis and Lincoln's differences in military experiences they both ultimately functioned as very competent war time leaders. Davis had a deep and natural military ability fostered by years in the army and graduation from West Point. Lincoln had no military experience but devoted himself to learning everything he could and found capable advisors such as Scott and Halleck. Both were not afraid to make the hard decisions and were willing to let their generals do their jobs without to much political interference. In this latter appraisal many still claim Davis was an arrogant hands-on commander-in-chief but, in reality, his orders were infrequent and usually for the best such as his order to Johnston to reinforce Beauregard at Manassas. Davis also had little need to interfere as he made many quality appointments that were based on military necessity and not, as Lincoln had to do, on political necessity. And even Lincoln stopped trying to influence his generals once he found one with ability, namely Meade.

A second theme discusses the concentration of troops in time and space. This very Napoleonic strategy of massing troops at the point of contact with the enemy found a home in the Confederate strategy. From the first battle of Manassas the Southern command used the telegraph and railroad to respond to Federal advances. Such technology went a long way to mitigating the disadvantage of trying to defend such a huge area. Nowhere was this better performed than at Shiloh where troops from 800 miles away were concentrated in time to fight in the two day battle. While the confederates effectively used their interior lines to concentrate in space the Federals tried to counter this with concentration of time. By launching simultaneous attacks at different points Confederates found that they were unable to pull troops from one area to concentrate in another. At the battle of Stones River the Confederates were caught at a disadvantage when one of their divisions was caught in transit and unable to help in either battle. But both strategies had their problems. Concentration on interior lines is still depended on quality railroads (that the south had in short supply) and quality maps (that were almost nonexistent) to move the troops in a timely manner. Concentration in time requires a harmony of logistics and command that just did not exists in the Union. While both strategies were useful they needed to be augmented by other less elaborate strategies.

While much hoopla has been given to the foolhardy frontal assaults of Burnside at Fredericksburg and Lee at Gettysburg Jones points out that it was the strategic turning movement that was the mainstay of the civil war battlefield. While the tactical turn had been negated by the flexibility and firepower of the new infantry regiment, the strategic turn was the answer to the supremacy of the tactical defense. The failures of Burnside and Lee are just illustrations of the futility of a frontal assault. To overcome the entrenched defender the savvy civil war general simply moved his army to the rear of the entrenchment or defensive line. At Chanslorsville, Hooker turned Lee's entrenched flank only to be turned by a mobile Lee in response. Hooker, once again facing a frontal assault and not a flank attack wisely withdrew.

Jones explains that the threat of a turning movement not only caused armies to move and abandon their defensive positions but also had the possibility to force the defender into an attack thus giving the turning force the advantage of the tactical defense. It was this theory that motivated McClellan to try to turn Richmond on the Peninsula. Indeed, from the Seven Days to Cold Harbor it was the strategic turning movement that dominated strategy on both sides.

Another strategy illustrated in the book was the raid. The raid found use on both sides during the war but for different reasons. The confederacy used the raid as a defective weapon to slow, stop, or redirect Union forces. The raid was particularly effective because of the heavy reliance that the Union forces had on their supply lines. The Confederacy found many ways to exploit this weakness; like guerrilla raids such as those in Tennessee, organized cavalry raids like those of Forest, and raids in force such as Lee's two invasions into Pennsylvania. It was to the Confederacy's dismay that Davis has trouble grasping the usefulness of such a strategy. For without theater support such activities were left to regional commands and were not as successful as they could have been.

It was not until the last years of the war that the North took to raiding as a military policy. And when they did it is for offensive purposes as opposed the South's defensive ones. Grant decided to abandon the stalemated territory acquisition approach to conquering the South and instead turned to raids that would destroy the South's infrastructure. Sherman's Mississippi and Georgia campaign are excellent example of the policy in effect.

Jones's book did a fantastic job of putting the command and strategy of the civil war into its proper context. In addition to its well documented challenges to many civil war myths and clichés, the reader will be treated to a firmer grasp on the reasons behind the commander's decisions and why the strategy on both sides developed the way it did. For those looking for a unique and interesting take on the civil war Archer Jones's Civil War Command and Strategy is worth the time.

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