» » Hell Gate of the Mississippi, the Effie Afton Trial and Abraham Lincoln's Role in It

Download Hell Gate of the Mississippi, the Effie Afton Trial and Abraham Lincoln's Role in It fb2

by Larry A. Riney

  • ISBN: 0979152801
  • Category: History
  • Author: Larry A. Riney
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Other formats: doc docx txt lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Talesman Press (June 20, 2007)
  • FB2 size: 1106 kb
  • EPUB size: 1964 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 649
Download Hell Gate of the Mississippi, the Effie Afton Trial and Abraham Lincoln's Role in It fb2

Start by marking Hell Gate of the Mississippi . Lincoln plays a relatively small role in the book. though this aspect did not detract from its value.

Lincoln plays a relatively small role in the book. May 10, 2016 Jacy Hahn rated it liked it. Thorough and detailed.

Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author.

Showing 12 distinct works. Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author.

Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

There's no description for this book yet.

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. Published June 20, 2007 by Talesman Press.

Some Lincoln biog-raphers, Riney writes, have portrayed the future president as the prac-tical downstate lawyer. who took charge of the tricky legal case and single-handedly fought the river interests (205). Lincoln, the story goes, was the only lawyer with the good sense to actually visit the Rock Island Bridge to assess the danger it posed.

The Effie Afton struck the bridge weeks after it opened, and steamboat companies brought lawsuits. It was replaced in 1866 by a wooden structure. In 1868, the second bridge was damaged by an ice storm and a tornado; however, construction crews repaired and reopened the bridge. It was replaced in 1872 by a twin double-deck bridge. The third bridge, 366 ft (112 m) long, was near the Rock Island shore.

Andersonvilles of the North: The Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners. Index to v. 68 and Back Matter, The Annals of Iowa, v. 68 no. 4 Fall 2009 Index to v. 4 Fall 2009.

The Effie Afton case by Elwin L Page( Book ).

For fifteen days in September, 1857, the attention of both the United States and Europe turned to a rundown Chicago courtroom. The steamboat Effie Afton had crashed into a pier of the first railroad bridge thrown across the Mississippi River at Rock Island, Illinois. The controversial lawsuit that followed promised to change the economy and the social fabric of the vast Mississippi River Valley. Some of the sharpest legal minds practicing in what was called at that time the Far West tried the test case. One of those lawyers was Abraham Lincoln. Hell Gate of the Mississippi puts you in the jury box for an up-close, firsthand look at this highly charged trial. Full of background information, the book examines the reasons why the litigation became an explosive issue for both the steamboat and railroad factions. In a year that saw such highly emotional and important events, such as the Dred Scott decision, the Mountain Meadows Massacre, false reports of "Indian" uprisings in Iowa, Walker in Nicaragua, and the sinking of the gold ship SS Central America, the Chicago lawsuit continually filled front page headlines on newspapers across the United States and Europe. Was the jury "stacked" against the river men and women who wanted the bridge torn down? Was Abraham Lincoln the lead council for the railroad promoters? Was he in charge of a compromised trial? These questions and more are answered in Hell Gate of the Mississippi. Copyright 2007
Reviews about Hell Gate of the Mississippi, the Effie Afton Trial and Abraham Lincoln's Role in It (2):
Vonalij
The maturation of the American society was a complex and idealistic endeavor that was accentuated by many different transitional phases. Hell Gate of the Mississippi marks one of these major transitions that occurred during the growth, which was emphasized by its' `Manifest Destiny'. The transition that the author, Larry A. Riney, transcribes in this journey presents nineteenth century America, and the great characters in these events utilized it as a major point of experience in their lives.
Hell Gate of the Mississippi presents a dichotomy that existed throughout history, the struggle between progress and the established norm. In this instance the established norm, the steamboat trade, and the desire to establish a progressive national railroad. The establishment of the national railroad meant that steamboats became more of an archaic endeavor. The railroads are presented to Americans as the cheaper, faster mode of transit for their businesses and social uses. However, even when the railroads were presented as an obstruction to the already established steamboat companies, the power of the purse prevailed. The railroads used the courts as their pulpit, presenting the American people with a high powered legal team, and the growth of the rail towns to accentuate a puppet courtroom. The legal team used savvy and their prestige, presenting individuals such of Abraham Lincoln, to push their case over the top, leaving the steam boaters cause with little more than a hope and a prayer.
The author presents to the reader a technical view on the maritime precedents that were established during this trial. This was a scholarly written piece of non-fiction that established most of what it sought out to accomplish. The most important presentation was to ascertain that the influential players involved in this event were not entirely essential to the outcome of the trial.

William Klotz
Vizil
Not as good as I thought

Related to Hell Gate of the Mississippi, the Effie Afton Trial and Abraham Lincoln's Role in It fb2 books: