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by Donald Bogle

  • ISBN: 0374527180
  • Category: History
  • Author: Donald Bogle
  • Subcategory: Americas
  • Other formats: lrf azw rtf doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (February 20, 2002)
  • Pages: 448 pages
  • FB2 size: 1147 kb
  • EPUB size: 1310 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 123
Download Primetime Blues: African Americans on Network Television fb2

A landmark study by the leading critic of African American film and television Primetime Blues is the first comprehensive history of African Americans on network television. Donald Bogle examines the stereotypes.

A landmark study by the leading critic of African American film and television Primetime Blues is the first comprehensive history of African Americans on network television.

Donald Bogle is an American film historian and author of six books concerning blacks in film and on television. He is an instructor at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts and at the University of Pennsylvania. Bogle grew up in a suburb of Philadelphia and graduated from Lincoln University in 1966. As a child, he spent a lot of time watching television and going to the movies. He wondered why there were very few black characters.

Primetime Blues is the first comprehensive history of African Americans on network television. Donald Bogle examines the stereotypes, which too often continue to march across the screen today, but also shows the ways in which television has been invigorated by extraordinary black performers, whose presence on the screen has been of great significance to the African American community. Bogle's exhaustive study moves from the postwar era of Beulah and Amos 'n' Andy to the politically restless sixties reflected in I Spy and an edgy, ultra-hip program like Mod Squad

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Primetime Blues book. A landmark study by the leading critic of African American film and.

As Donald Bogle points out in his new book, Primetime Blues: African Americans on Network Television, the Benny program showcased wonderful, nervy work by Eddie Rochester Anderson, who played Benny’s wily valet. There was nothing servile or submissive about, Bogle writes. Cocky and confident, always resourceful and witty, Rochester seemed his own man and usually behaved as if he were the boss in the Jack Benny household; an idea that the scriptwriters played with time and again

Scholar Donald Bogle adds another exceptional book to his works about African-Americans in film and television. Bogle's critique is unsurprisingly sharp. What makes Primetime Blues extraordinary is his shameless approach to the medium.

Scholar Donald Bogle adds another exceptional book to his works about African-Americans in film and television. Unlike other critics who bemoan television, Bogle admits his enjoyment of it with no apology.

African Americans on Network Television. Things soon changed abruptly: by 1951 there were over 16 million televisions, advertising costs had soared, and corporations competed to sponsor popular shows. The author notes that early shows like Beulah and Amos ’n’ Andy still celebrated such racial stereotypes as saucy maids and irresponsible males.

Prime Time Blues is the first comprehensive history of African Americans on the network series. Bogle also reveals another equally important aspect of TV history: namely, that television has been invigorated by extraordinary Black performers - from Ethel Waters and Eddie "Rochester" Anderson to Cicely Tyson, Flip Wilson, Redd Foxx and those mighty power brokers Cosby and Oprah - who frequently use the medium to make personal and cultural statements and whose presence on the tube. has been of enormous significance to the African American community.

A landmark study by the leading critic of African American film and televisionPrimetime Blues is the first comprehensive history of African Americans on network television. Donald Bogle examines the stereotypes, which too often continue to march across the screen today, but also shows the ways in which television has been invigorated by extraordinary black performers, whose presence on the screen has been of great significance to the African American community. Bogle's exhaustive study moves from the postwar era of Beulah and Amos 'n' Andy to the politically restless sixties reflected in I Spy and an edgy, ultra-hip program like Mod Squad. He examines the television of the seventies, when a nation still caught up in Vietnam and Watergate retreated into the ethnic humor of Sanford and Son and Good Times and the poltically conservative eighties marked by the unexpected success of The Cosby Show and the emergence of deracialized characters on such dramatic series as L.A. Law. Finally, he turns a critical eye to the television landscape of the nineties, with shows such as The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, I'll Fly Away, ER, and The Steve Harvey Show.
Reviews about Primetime Blues: African Americans on Network Television (6):
Cerana
Donald Bogle’s Primetime Blues is may be the most detailed historical accounts of African-American performers on television. Bogle meticulously accounts for television shows featuring African-American performers in lead and supporting roles from 1950 – 1990. Bogle groups the series by themes (often ubiquitous misrepresentations of African-Americans) and provides a synopsis of the series, a few notable or infamous episodes and profiles of actors. I would have preferred more information about the development of the shows. Bogle delved into the development of a few programs including: The Cosby Show, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Roots and The Making of Jane Pittman but I would have provided more insight into the networks thinking about the select programs they did elect to air featuring African-American talent.

Primetime Blues is not a completely objective account; Bogle inserts his personal commentary throughout his account. One comment about OJ Simpson in particular stood out for me, “his starring role in the most riveting TV of the 1990s, his trial for the murder of his former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson.” Overall, I enjoyed Primetime Blues. I hope Bogle has plans to update this book to include the Golden Age of TV and highlight African-American acclaimed actors, showrunners and directors including Shonda Rhimes, Ava Duvernay, Lee Daniels, John Ridley, Oprah Winfrey (OWN), Issa Rae, Donald Glover, Angela Bassett, Viola Davis, Regina King, Courtney Vance, Sterling K. Brown.
Dikus
Although I initially intended on simply reviewing Bogle's masterwork, I feel that along with a personal reflection on the book, it is necessary to contradict statements made by an earlier reviewer.
Yes, the book is "exhaustive" but never is it boring. Every profile of African-American actors on the tube is carefully detailed and extensively covered, with little asides that make for intriguing reading. To this reader, it is clear that Bogle feels that there have been significant improvements in the representation of Blacks on television, but there are still some significant inroads, in front of and behind the camera, that need to be made. By covering as thoroughly as he has the entirety of those African-American pioneers and trendsetters, the author satisfies those that have longed to see such a mammoth undertaking published.
I, for one, savor the profiles of such underrated performers as Rosalind Cash, Joe Morton, Shirley Hemphill, Juano Hernandez, James Edwards, and a slew of others that labored with many less-than-distinguished parts and managed to create something memorable. It is further refreshing to see the author give the backgrounds of the more familiar African-American superstars like Bill Cosby, Cicely Tyson, and Diahann Carroll.
While I do not particularly care for the programs that have a "monochromatic cast" (Friends, Martin, and the various UPN "black-block" shows), I understand and appreciate Bogle's belief that television shows have a responsibility to inform and present a realistic portrayal of society, be that program a sitcom or a drama.
It is true that television is primarily entertainment; however, in that entertainment, thought-provoking writing and occasional commentary on society is warranted. That is one of Bogle's premises that he eloquently expresses.
This is a top-notch historical/editorial reference that makes for great reading and a worthwhile addition to the library of any fan of the "boob tube."
Mr.Death
i re-found this book at a good price for the book itself as well as for shipping. it was in very good condition.
Fearlesshunter
Great History Lesson about the known and unknown pioneers of television.
Fecage
Bogle does it again, I never seen a man be so consistent. He seems to criticize anything Blacks do even being born black.

What Blacks have done on TV should be applauded, Blacks have had great success and once in while their shows ruled the airwaves. Everything Blacks do doesn't have to be Black or be a portrayal of Blacks, why can't Blacks just entertain and show they can do something outside of being blacks, they can play people from all walks of life, everything doesn't have to be so true. First off, Bogle seems to insinuate that Black people are just cursed, even when Blacks succeeded he got something critical to say. Listen, who don't face discrimination, surprisingly even whites do, I hope I didn't shock you. Many of our classic black TV shows are icons and even to this day people are still enjoying them because the shows were good TV. If anything he should criticize the blacks on TV today but he takes cheap shots at people who are dead or too old to talk.
Tenius
A highly comprehensive and detailed history of Blacks on television. Bogle is quite critical in his analysis of Black television - from the roles actors and actresses played to the actual sitcoms, dramas, and movies that were aired. As usual with Bogle's works, he always provides this reader with a name that I've never heard before, which compels me to do further research. While I may not always agree with his conclusions, he does present a worthy different point of view.

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