» » Morocco since 1830: A History

Download Morocco since 1830: A History fb2

by C.R. Pennell

  • ISBN: 0814766765
  • Category: History
  • Author: C.R. Pennell
  • Subcategory: Africa
  • Other formats: mbr docx azw doc
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: NYU Press (January 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 442 pages
  • FB2 size: 1486 kb
  • EPUB size: 1612 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 298
Download Morocco since 1830: A History fb2

Morocco since 1830: A Hi. .has been added to your Cart. Paperback: 442 pages.

Morocco since 1830: A Hi. Publisher: NYU Press (January 1, 2001).

Morocco Since 1830 book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Morocco Since 1830: A History as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Morocco since 1830: a history, C. R. Pennell, London: Hurst, 2001 (xxxiv+442pp. C. Pennell set out to write a comprehensive history of Morocco which, unlike almost all previous histories of that country either before or since its independence, would be without a specific agenda. Preferring not to engage with the arguments raised in French colonial writing or between the Moroccan left and right, he has chosen to adopt a strictly chronological approach.

Morocco since 1830 is a welcome survey of the modern perio. ithy, argumentative, concise and engaging. Bibliographic Details. - David M. Hart, Middle Eastern Studies. Morocco since 1830 is a welcome survey of the modern perio.

Morocco since 1830: A History explores the profound changes that have affected social relations in Morocco over .

Morocco since 1830: A History explores the profound changes that have affected social relations in Morocco over the last 150 years, especially those between the sexes, and between linguistic identities and cultures. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Country of Publication.

Morocco Since 1830: A History. This book meets the need for an up-to-date history of modern Morocco in English. The major emphasis is on political history, but it also deftly works in economic and social subjects. Unlike most country studies that stint on the earlier years to concentrate on more recent history, this book gives equal treatment to all periods - the years before France colonized Morocco in 1830, the protectorate years (1912-56), and restored independence thereafter. As well as dynastic and political events, this history examines the changing lives of ordinary Moroccans, most of whom are poor and whose lives are shaped by their economic circumstances.

Morocco Since 1830 : A History. The first general history in English of Morocco in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Morocco since 1830: A History explores the profound changes that have affected social relations in Morocco over the last 150 years, especially those between the sexes, and between linguistic identities and cultures.

The first general history in English of Morocco in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Morocco since 1830: A.

The first general history in English of Morocco in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Morocco since 1830: A History explores the profound changes that have affected social relations in Morocco over the last 150 years, especially those between the sexes, and between linguistic identities and cultures. Although the country has returned to roughly its pre-colonial boundaries, Morocco still suffers from the effects of colonization by France and Spain.

Article in The Journal of African History 44(01) · March 2003 with 6 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. MOROCCO'S MODERN HISTORY Morocco since 1830: A History. 4. 0 (ISBN 1-85065-273-2); £1. 0, paperback (ISBN 1-85065-426-3).

The first general history in English of Morocco in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Morocco since 1830: A History explores the profound changes that have affected social relations in Morocco over the last 150 years, especially those between the sexes, and between linguistic identities and cultures.

Although the country has returned to roughly its pre-colonial boundaries, Morocco still suffers from the effects of colonization by France and Spain. Its current king, like the sultans of the nineteenth century, claims legitimacy through his leadership of the Islamic community, but there is a long tradition of dissent based on Islamic ideals. Morocco's history is also marked by the enduring presence of a large Jewish community.

This comprehensive portrait examines the tactics used by Moroccan rulers to cope with European penetration in the nineteenth century and colonialism in the twentieth, and, since the 1950s, to retain control of the independent state. As Pennell points out, however, the ruling dynasty is not sufficiently representative of modern Morocco, nor are political events the only influence on change. Most Moroccans are still poor, and their lives are shaped by their economic circumstances. The influence of harvests, access to land and water, and external trade have always determined the fate of the majority.


Reviews about Morocco since 1830: A History (3):
Yozshujind
I have read more than one of this author's works. I have the same comments for each of them; they are filled with excellent content that is logically and clearly presented, if a little dry. There isn't much in the writing style that makes the events come alive, but the facts and descriptions are as accurate as they can be. This is well worth studying and a noble addition to the world's knowledge.
Vudojar
...but as a new student of Maghreb history, I found this book to be less helpful than I would have liked in providing me the opportunity to identify what the true questions are for somebody wanting to understand how or why Morocco is a unique case worthy of further study.
Qus
Morocco was the first nation with which the USA ever signed a treaty of peace and friendship, in June of 1786, and the two countries have been friends ever since. In November, 1942 Moroccan troops helped American troops evict Vichy French troops and the "German Armistice Commission" from Morocco. However, the history of Morocco is not well known in the USA, largely because there has been no good book in English on the subject until this one.
Having been an eyewitness of events in Morocco from 1951 to 1954, and having talked to many residents of Morocco (Arab, Berber, French, etc.) about their recollections, I am deeply impressed by how much Pennell knows about the period I saw or heard about. For example, he briefly mentions a fact I never expected to see in print: that many (perhaps most) of the weapons used by the Moroccan independence movement in the '50s were supplied by American enlisted men and junior officers on bases in Morocco; the weapons were gotten from NATO stocks in Europe and flown secretly into Morocco by US military pilots in USAF and USN aircraft. Because every American involved was risking a general court-martial, they all took great care to keep this traffic a secret. But Pennell mentions it in one sentence, although he doesn't quite get it correct. Amazing that he found about it at all!
I could cite various other facts that I'm surprised Pennell unearthed. However, he doesn't always get the context quite right. For example, after discussing the final phase of French military conquest in 1934, he leaves the impression that French rule in the French "Protectorate" was complete. He seems to be unaware that the fighting in the High Atlas and AntiAtlas had been so difficult that the French unofficially agreed that they would not attempt to establish French rule in certain parts of those areas, provided that the Berber tribes didn't take military action against the French elsewhere.
He also has a difficult time disentangling the activities and motives of Si Thami El Glaoui, the pasha of Marrakesh from 1918 to 1956. This is not surprising; El Glaoui was one of the most complex and enigmatic characters of the 20th Century. Pennell portrays El Glaoui basically as a supporter of the French, and of conservative forces. I believe this is somewhat of a misinterpretation. El Glaoui used the French, and was used by the French, for most of El Glaoui's years in power; however, El Glaoui's primary motive was neither radical nor conservative, neither pro-European nor anti-European, neither a modernizer nor a foot-dragger. El Glaoui's overriding motive was to keep the Berber tribes of Central and Southern Morocco united enough, under his control, to prevent them from being completely subjugated by the French, the Arabs, or anybody else. To do that, he would have made a pact with the Devil, and several times more or less did. This doesn't come across clearly in Pennell's book, although he has his facts straight about El Glaoui's words and actions.
And he fails to convey clearly the unpredictability and occasional intensity of the fighting between the independence movement on one side and the French and Spanish on the other, throughout the period between the start of the independence movement and the achievement of independence. Indeed, by 1952, some senior French civil servants in Morocco considered that the French had already lost, and by 1954 the heart of the Casablanca Arab section was completely under control of the independence movement; no French force smaller than a platoon could enter that area without taking heavy casualties.
Despite such minor quibbles, this is an admirable, carefully researched book, with plenty of source notes and a good bibliography. I believe it will be the standard work on its subject for many years.

Related to Morocco since 1830: A History fb2 books: