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by Norah Vincent

  • ISBN: 0143116851
  • Category: Health & Fitness
  • Author: Norah Vincent
  • Subcategory: Psychology & Counseling
  • Other formats: doc rtf azw mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (December 29, 2009)
  • Pages: 304 pages
  • FB2 size: 1974 kb
  • EPUB size: 1846 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 285
Download Voluntary Madness: Lost and Found in the Mental Healthcare System fb2

VOLUNTARY MADNESS by Norah Vincent was FASCINATING. I write that in all caps because I mean it in the literal sense of the word, not as a vague compliment.

VOLUNTARY MADNESS by Norah Vincent was FASCINATING. Except she did, because as a spectacle, the mental ward was impossible to beat, and as a journalist, she couldn't resist it.

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Voluntary Madness is the chronicle of Vincent's journey through the world of the mentally ill as she struggles to find her own health and happiness.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Voluntary Madness is the chronicle of Vincent's journey through the world of the mentally ill as she struggles to find her own health and happiness. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Penguin GroupReleased: Dec 30, 2008ISBN: 9781440641039Format: book. carousel previous carousel next. Adeline: A Novel of Virginia Woolf.

Voluntary madness : my year lost and found in the loony bin, by Norah Vincent. 1. Vincent, Norah-Mental health. p. cm. eISBN : 978-1-440-64103-9. 2. Psychiatric hospital patients-United States-Biography. 3. Journalists-United States-Biography.

Vincent's book Voluntary Madness is about her experiences as an inpatient in a mental hospital. a b c Vincent, Norah (December 2009). Voluntary Madness: Lost and Found in the Mental Healthcare System. Suffering from depression after her eighteen months living disguised as a man, she felt she was a danger to herself. On the advice of her psychologist she committed herself to a mental institution. Vincent spent time in three institutions – one urban, public and ill-funded; one small-town; and one private and expensive.

Voluntary Madness : Lost and Found in the Mental Healthcare System.

It’s no secret that Norah Vincent can write compelling non-fiction

It’s no secret that Norah Vincent can write compelling non-fiction. For her first book, Self-Made Man (2006), she transformed herself into a passable male through weight lifting, voice lessons, wardrobe, makeup and a chest-flattening bra, then set out to infiltrate exclusive all-male environments and if possible learn their secrets. At 34 he’s marginally employed as a freelance writer and still living in the suburban house in the Midwest where he grew up, the house where, 13 years ago, his father shot his mother dead and then killed himself. Nick, to put it mildly, has issues.

From the author of The New York Times bestseller Self- Made Man, a captivating expose of depression and mental illness in America Revelatory, deeply personal, and utterly relevant, Voluntary Madness is a controversial work that unveils the state of mental healthcare in the United States from the inside out. At the conclusion of her celebrated first book--Self-Made Man, in which she soent eighteen months disguised as a man-Norah Vincent found herself emotionally drained and severely depressed. Determined but uncertain about maintaining her own equilibrium, she boldly committed herself to three different facilities-a big-city hospital, a private clinic in the Midwest, and finally an upscale retreat in the South. Voluntary Madness is the chronicle of Vincent's journey through the world of the mentally ill as she struggles to find her own health and happiness.
Reviews about Voluntary Madness: Lost and Found in the Mental Healthcare System (7):
Memuro
I like Norah Vincent's experiment, but I found her writing style hard-pressed to keep me hooked into the story. I actually found myself hunkering down and powering through chapters like I would have done in a college course I hated but needed, simply because her prose often meandered where it wasn't needed, or she tried to inject every intellectual phrase she could come up with into every drawn out encounter. I expected a far better insight into the world of a mental institution, but instead got the equivalent of a college-padded-for-content term paper.
Prorahun
Voluntary Madness is a disappointing book. I was intriqued by the premise of the book and the writing started out all right. Voluntary Madness is a disappointing book. I was intriqued by the premise of the book and the writing started out all right. Ms. Vincent "voluntarily" checks herself into three separate mental health organizations in attempt to bring down the system around our ears. She sets out to expose the big bad system. She doesn't actually pull it off, although she does get some points across well and manages to make a personal breakthrough in her last placement.

The interesting thing is that Norah Vincent just comes across as angry. Angry at the whole world. She slams the people who work in a mental hospital or ward calling them lazy and unsympathetic. She rants against the rules. She rants against this drugs. I actually wanted to agree with her on this one because I believe by and large we overuse drugs in our society and she made some valid points but they get lost in her anger. She blames the residents/clients who start coming to her with a sense of entitlement .

The author ends the book with perhaps the best writing of the entire tome. She wonders about institutions being the way they are because of people or it is vice versa? She then turns her anger from the institutions to the people and asks, "Why waste therapy and resources on people who will actively resist, and so derive no benefit from them anyway? Why not just medicate the bejesus out of people, when medication is the one thing that requires no effort or willpower to have an effect? If people arent' going to heal, because they don't want to heal, then containment is the most any system can do for them and for us. And containment is necessary." (p. 275).

Ms. Vincent continues to philosophize in such a manner for a while before she flips the script and tells the reader that there is a bright side. People can help themselves. Ultimately, change is up to the individual, he or she must take responsibility for their own change. It is in this that I agree with the author fully. It is also this part that will cause those entrenched "in the system" to become angry with her. This book is a quick read and not exactly a deep read. It's a lot about the author and I never felt like I should care about her all that much. Some of her conclusions are interesting. Ultimately, the value in this book came from being able to watch her work through her naivety (she even admits to it in the book). I'd be fascinated to meet her I suppose to see if her anger comes out in her personal life as it does in her writing.

Right now, Amazon has this book for 6 bucks. It's probably not worth a whole lot more than that, but at that price you might enjoy it.
2.5 Stars out of 5.
Raniconne
Meh. Some interesting stories. Good insight, especially if you know little about our mental health system. I wasn't drawn in enough to finish it- and I've had it for more than a month (during which time I've traveled, when I read a lot, and finished other books).
artman
A good look into the mental health system in this country.
Seevinev
The writing is annoying. I bought this because it's "mandatory" for a class I have. Not sure I am going to be able to swallow it.
generation of new
My spouse has significant emotional health issues that I didn't understand. This book did a fantastic job at explaining the journey to healing and whats necessary. It explains why so often people don't get better. Read this book if a loved one, friend or family has emotional challenges or addiction issues.
Cobyno
Fantastic
VOLUNTARY MADNESS by Norah Vincent was FASCINATING. I write that in all caps because I mean it in the literal sense of the word, not as a vague compliment. After picking the book up casually, halfway into the first chapter I became absolutely compelled to read it.
While researching another book, Ms. Vincent became depressed and checked herself into a classic mental ward, which scared the bejesus out of her. She swore she'd never do it again. Except she did, because as a spectacle, the mental ward was impossible to beat, and as a journalist, she couldn't resist it. Having had personal experience with mental illness, she decided to "fake" more severe mental illness and spend time in different types of mental institutions, rural, expensive, public, comparing the treatment she receives. Her intent is to write an expose the system, but her results, both journalistic and personal, are much more complex than she- or I- anticipate.
I started reading expecting a voyeuristic, holy-canole, amusing thrill ride, but her experiences were much more enlightening than that. There was plenty of drama and backstage dirt, but her relationships with other patients, staff, and herself end up being much more memorable in the long run. Norah Vincent's writing is smooth and concise. I never once had to re-read a sentence to figure out what she was saying- her words never got in the way of her meaning. She writes clearly and conversationally about scientific principles and psyciatric medications, without getting bogged down or ruining the flow of her story-telling. She is BRUTALLY honest about her own personal history and her reactions to psychotherapy. She gives so much of herself in this book that I almost want to send her a check and pay for the book twice. (I'm too cheap to actually do it, however!)
It's a weighty subject and she doesn't dodge the tough stuff, but the book isn't a weighty read. It's fun, funny, entertaining, thought-provoking- everything, in short, that I want a book to be. As my ultimate act of reader-judgment, after reading this, I immediately ordered all her other books!

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