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by Augusten Burroughs,John Elder Robison

  • ISBN: 0739357689
  • Category: Health & Fitness
  • Author: Augusten Burroughs,John Elder Robison
  • Subcategory: Children's Health
  • Other formats: rtf lrf mobi lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House Audio; Abridged edition (September 25, 2007)
  • FB2 size: 1950 kb
  • EPUB size: 1271 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 960
Download Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's fb2

by Augusten Burroughs. MY BIG BROTHER and I were essentially raised by two different sets of parents. I didn’t even understand what looking someone in the eye meant. And yet I felt ashamed, because people expected me to do it, and I knew it, and yet I didn’t

by Augusten Burroughs. His mother and father were an optimistic young couple in their twenties, just starting out in their marriage, building a new life together. And yet I felt ashamed, because people expected me to do it, and I knew it, and yet I didn’t. So what was wrong with me?

I hugely enjoyed reading Look Me in the Eye. This book is a wild rollercoaster ride through John .

I hugely enjoyed reading Look Me in the Eye. This book is a wild rollercoaster ride through John Robison’s life-from troubled teenage prankster to successful employment in electronics, music, and classic cars. His story provides ample evidence for my belief that individuals on the autistic spectrum are just as capable of rich and productive lives as anyone else.

Hearing these predictions made Robison withdraw Look me in the eyes, young man!  . These are just some of the things John Elder Robison heard as a young boy, decades before a friend handed him a book about Asperger’s Syndrome and told him, "This book describes you exactly.

Hearing these predictions made Robison withdraw Look me in the eyes, young man! Nobody trusts a man who won’t look them in the eye. You look like a criminal. Hearing these predictions made Robison withdraw even further as a child as he waited for these awful things to come true.

by John Elder Robison (Author), Augusten Burroughs (Foreword). Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).

Chicago Sun-Times "Look Me in the Eyeis a fantastic read that takes readers into the mind of an Aspergian both through its plot and through .

Chicago Sun-Times "Look Me in the Eyeis a fantastic read that takes readers into the mind of an Aspergian both through its plot and through the calm, logical style in which Robison writes. Even if you have no personal connections with Asperger's, you'll find that Robisonlike his brother, Burroughshas a life worth reading about. This book is a wild rollercoaster ride through John Robison''s life-from troubled teenage prankster to successful employment in electronics, music, and classic cars. A kindly professor introduced him to electrical engineering, which led to jobs where he found techie soulmates that were like him. Больше.

John Elder Robison (born August 13, 1957) is the author of the 2007 memoir Look Me in the Eye, detailing his life with undiagnosed Asperger syndrome and savant abilities, and of three other books. Robison has had several careers. In the 1970s, he worked as an engineer in the music business where he is best known for creating the signature special effects guitars played by the band KISS.

Crown/Archetype, 25 сент. JOHN ELDER ROBISON is the New York Times bestselling author of Look Me in the Eye, Be Different and Raising Cubby.

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER, As sweet and funny and sad and true and heartfelt a memoir as one could find. Crown/Archetype, 25 сент. He lectures widely on autism and neurological differences, and is a member of the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee of the US Dept. of Health and Human Services.

John Robison lives with his wife and son in Amherst, Massachusetts. I love this book-the way that it is written and the impact that it had on me as a person

John Robison lives with his wife and son in Amherst, Massachusetts. His company, J E Robison Service, repairs and restores classic cars such as Jaguars, Land Rovers, Rolls Royces and Bentleys. I love this book-the way that it is written and the impact that it had on me as a person. I did not know about Asperger. Now I take the time to realize that not everyone comes to me will have everything I thought that a human would have. I realize we all have s you can notice these as Asperger's.

The parents of Augusten Burroughs (mad, bisexual mother/ violent . Burroughs's memoir of his childhood, Running with Scissors, was published in 2002.

The parents of Augusten Burroughs (mad, bisexual mother/ violent, alcoholic father) didn't just f him up. They f ed up his brother, John Elder Robison, too. So now we have two tragicomic memoirs of life in the same eye-poppingly dysfunctional family. It's hard to deduce who fared worse.

More Audiobooks By John Elder Robison. Written by the brother of Augusten Burroughs (Running with Scissors). I was much more interested in the author's insights to his Asperger's and the explaniations of his thought processes than his life story. carousel previous carousel next. Switched On: A Memoir of Brain Change and Emotional Awakening.

Ever since he was small, John Robison had longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits—an inclination to blurt out non sequiturs, avoid eye contact, dismantle radios, and dig five-foot holes (and stick his younger brother in them)—had earned him the label “social deviant.” No guidance came from his mother, who conversed with light fixtures, or his father, who spent evenings pickling himself in sherry. It was no wonder he gravitated to machines, which could, at least, be counted on.After fleeing his parents and dropping out of high school, his savant-like ability to visualize electronic circuits landed him a gig with KISS, for whom he created their legendary fire-breathing guitars. Later, he drifted into a “real” job, as an engineer for a major toy company. But the higher Robison rose in the company, the more he had to pretend to be “normal” and do what he simply couldn’t: communicate. It wasn’t worth the paycheck.It was not until he was forty that an insightful therapist told him he had the form of autism called Asperger’s syndrome. That understanding transformed the way Robison saw himself—and the world.Look Me in the Eye is the moving, darkly funny story of growing up with Asperger’s at a time when the diagnosis simply didn’t exist. A born storyteller, Robison takes you inside the head of a boy whom teachers and other adults regarded as “defective,” who could not avail himself of KISS’s endless supply of groupies, and who still has a peculiar aversion to using people’s given names (he calls his wife “Unit Two”). He also provides a fascinating reverse angle on the younger brother he left at the mercy of their nutty parents—the boy who would later change his name to Augusten Burroughs and write the bestselling memoir Running with Scissors.Ultimately, this is the story of Robison’s journey from his world into ours, and his new life as a husband, father, and successful small business owner—repairing his beloved high-end automobiles. It’s a strange, sly, indelible account—sometimes alien, yet always deeply human.From the Hardcover edition.
Reviews about Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's (7):
Mori
I enjoyed this book. Robison had difficulty all of his life relating to people, emotions, social situations. He was incredibly gifted in understanding electronics and math, but normal conversations baffled him. It wasn't until he was 40 yrs old that he was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome - a form of autism. In this memoir he recounts his awkward childhood, few friends, the butt of jokes, being bullied. Even though he tested far above his schoolmates in intelligence, he dropped out of school before graduating. His home life was chaos, with an alcoholic father and a mother with mental issues. His expertise in electronics led to small jobs fixing amplifiers for local rock bands, and finally as the electronics special-effects guy for the band KISS. He entered the corporate world helping design inter-active games and early video games, but finally left when he was promoted to management and didn't like it (managing people was difficult, he was not able to use his hands and expertise, and the rat-race stress was too much). He went back to mechanics and opened a luxury car repair business. The parts of the memoir where he discusses his feelings and frustrations about relationships, and the Asperger's-related issues, are very good. But (as other reviewers have noted) there is way too much technical stuff about retrofitting fire-breathing guitars and designing games. Overall, a good memoir, if you can kind of scan over the super-techie parts.
Uttegirazu
John Elder, you are awesome for what you have overcome! We have a seven year old (also named John) who was diagnosed a few months ago. Trouble in school, self hate and other things are big things already. This memoir opened my eyes to an understanding of what we are dealing with on a daily basis; his anxiety; his lack of understanding at others expressions in speech, and body language; his frustration with other people not understanding his point the first time (He hates explaining things to "stupid" people). THANK YOU for sharing your story, it is amazing to see the hope of a bright future, the perseverance of someone who kept on trying new things and learned to work through difficulties and find a measure of satisfaction with life in spite of emotional and social adversity. People who read this book need to be sure and read the Preface and Prologue as they are an essential part of the book, as well. I read cover to cover with a pencil, marked it up with points to review and then went back and read the entire thing again.
Ceroelyu
My grandson was recently diagnosed as autistic. Being one of his caregivers for the last 4 years, I had not seen a difference in his actions and mine as a child or some even now. After scoring high in an Autism Spectrum Quotient test online, I spoke to my therapist. He suggested I read this book. After reading, pieces of my childhood started to fall into place and questions unanswered for the past 50 years began to make sense. This is a good read for anyone who suspects they may be on the spectrum, knows someone on the spectrum, or just wants to know more about autism.
Siramath
I have a young son who is 4 years old. He is atypical but very subtle when you meet him. Most people think his "traits" (sensitivity to sound, late potty train, echoing (repetitions of words), delay lack of communication flapping of arms when excited, lack of play with others) will be outgrown eventually. However, highly intelligent recognize letters and counts to 200 at age 2, reads, writes, spells, memorize downloadable from videos at age 2 1/2 years. As with motherly instincts, I insisted to the pediatrician that I need to see specialists which with persistency eventually happened. So with his second follow up in a few weeks with a child's developmental specialists, I decided to do some research by reading and watching videos of Aspergers. I don't know what the results will be with my son but at least I can be more knowledgeable about this topic.
This gives you understanding of how Aspergerians deal with social aspects, why they do what they do and that despite this condition (NOT a disease), they can still have a family, career....a fulfilling life. The only part that I didn't really care for is the details of his interests (experiments, pyrotechnics, trains). It was a bit boring to me but after reading this book, you will understand why. Overall, I think families should look into this book as a way to understand the perception of this way of life.
Celen
This book is funny, insightful and eye opening. It opens up a window into the life of someone who has Asperger's Syndrome. John Robinson shares his story in a no nonsense way, it's totally honest and makes no excuses. It was by far one of the easiest books for me to read. It flowed and kept my attention throughout, from beginning to end. It was sweet in a lot of ways and a bit shocking in others, but I was able to get a real sense of how many children and adults live their daily lives who are on the spectrum. John Robinson was really likable and its hard to believe he wasn't able to make many friends as you really can see his personality shine through. I loved seeing the interactions with his brother and how it changed over the years. If you have a child on the spectrum, know of a child on the spectrum, or even if you don't this is a great afternoon read. I received this book for free in return for my honest opinion, no compensation was received.

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