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by G Orwell

  • ISBN: 0436350106
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: G Orwell
  • Subcategory: Women's Fiction
  • Other formats: txt mbr docx azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Secker & Warburg; New Ed edition (1960)
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • FB2 size: 1174 kb
  • EPUB size: 1531 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 117
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A Clergyman's Daughter is a 1935 novel by English author George Orwell. It tells the story of Dorothy Hare, the clergyman's daughter of the title, whose life is turned upside down when she suffers an attack of amnesia

A Clergyman's Daughter is a 1935 novel by English author George Orwell. It tells the story of Dorothy Hare, the clergyman's daughter of the title, whose life is turned upside down when she suffers an attack of amnesia. It is Orwell's most formally experimental novel, featuring a chapter written entirely in dramatic form, but he was never satisfied with it and he left instructions that after his death it was not to be reprinted

Home George Orwell A Clergyman's Daughter. Title: A CLERGYMAN'S DAUGHTER. Author: George Orwell.

Home George Orwell A Clergyman's Daughter. A clergymans daughter, p. 1. A Clergyman's Daughter, . show page numbers ▼ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31.

A clergyman’s daughter by: george orwell category: fiction - novel. But that a clergyman has any duties outside the four walls of the church was a thing that had never seriously occurred to him. A Clergyman's Daughter. Unable to afford a curate, he left the dirty work of the parish entirely to his wife, and after her death (she died in 1921) to Dorothy. People used to say, spitefully and untruly, that he would have let Dorothy preach his sermons for him if it had been possible.

Nowadays, a clergyman who wants to keep his congregation has only two courses open to him. Either it must be Anglo- Catholicism pure and simple-or rather, pure and not simple; or he must be daringly modern an. . Either it must be Anglo- Catholicism pure and simple-or rather, pure and not simple; or he must be daringly modern and broad-minded and preach comforting sermons proving that there is no Hell and all good religions are the same. On coming of age he had inherited four thousand pounds, which had gradually dwindled, thanks to his 'investments', to about twelve hundred. What was worse, every year he managed to scrape together, out of his miserable income, another fifty pounds which vanished by the same road.

A Clergyman’s Daughter. George Orwell A Clergyman’s Daughter Harvest book. Dorothy is the daughter of the Reverend Charles Hare, rector of St. Athelstan’s in Depression-era Suffolk, England. She serves as a dutiful housekeeper, performs good works, cultivates good thoughts-and pricks her arm with a pin when a bad thought arises. A Clergyman’s Daughter Harvest book.

George Orwell, A Clergyman's Daughter. Bottom-shelf Orwell, but still pretty good. I'm not sure I enjoyed the ending, but I'm glad Orwell left a small caveat and let this book be printed after his death, if only to benefit his heirs. the woman character of this book, Dorothy, the clergyman's daughter, is a 28 year old virgin, and her life revolves around the church and caring for her father and old people.

A Clergyman's Daughter. Flag as Inappropriate Orwell, George (1986), A Clergyman's Daughter, The Complete Works of George Orwell, London: Secker & Warburg. Flag as Inappropriate. Are you certain this article is inappropriate? Excessive Violence Sexual Content Political, Social. The book was translated into Thai as Lok Khong Khru Sao (โลกของครูสาว) by Sunantha Laojan (สุนันทา เหล่าจัน) and first published in 1975 by Kledthai Publishers. It was first translated into Russian by Kenneth MacInnes and Vera Domiteeva (1994) and released by Azbooka Publishers (2004) and Astrel (2011). Orwell, George (1986), A Clergyman's Daughter, The Complete Works of George Orwell, London: Secker & Warburg

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Электронная книга "A Clergyman’s Daughter", George Orwell. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "A Clergyman’s Daughter" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. When the book departs from Trollope mode, you realize that Daughter will be no routine work of fiction and that the author has his own agenda. Orwell's novel about a clergyman's daughter who finds herself in the slums. That agenda has in part to do with the role of religion in life. Dorothy loses her faith, not as an act of will, but rather passively-she realizes one day that all she was taught to believe is fiction.


Reviews about A Clergyman's Daughter (7):
Arcanescar
Most of us are familiar with Animal Farm and 1984; this story of a clergyman's daughter living in 1930's England is far more grim and depressing than any of Orwell's totalitarian dystopias. Orwell the freethinker sees the Christian life as nothing but unrelieved hypocrisy, cant, and flummery, a way of making you feel like you are a good person as long as you are making yourself miserable. Perhaps the Anglican Church in prewar England was indeed a discouraging spectacle; certainly the manners and mores of most English people in that period seem to have been less than life-embracing. The characters in this novel are mostly shabby and small; even the better ones are hardly heroic, but I cannot believe that the English were ever such an utterly mean and joyless people as Orwell makes them out to be, and in his scant regard for the established church he misses the spirit of true Christianity. In some ways this was an informative description of English society, but it was not a good story.
Erienan
Very enjoyable, darkly comic and ultimately fatalistic social commentary, as well as the story of a conflicted woman suffering a break from reality as she loses her Christian faith. Outwardly upright Christian woman in small and small-minded English town suddenly loses memory, ends up in misadventures with low-class and homeless people before regaining her memory. Subsequently finds herself in a possibly worse situation in a scandalously bad, sham, miserable private school in lower-class suburban outskirts of London. Exposes paltry conditions in English countryside for the poor, hop farm conditions, small town English provincialism, London street life and awful educational system. Like other Orwell works, shows the seamy and miserable side of life, especially poverty and its effects. Resigned to the idea that the best way to get through life is to stay busy and occupied - just work, don't think - whether you have faith or not. Faith in God is irrelevant.
Lilegha
My second non-big-two (Animal Farm and 1984) Orwell novel, and I enjoyed it every bit as much as the first (Burmese Days). Daughter follows the early life of Dorothy, who is the daughter of the Rector of Knype Hill, a small town in England. The Rector is, by far, the most destructive character in the book--a detail not lost on me. He's selfish, ignorant, and lazy--all of which characteristics combine and contribute to Dorothy's troubles.

Poor Dorothy begins essentially as the Rector's unpaid curate, except that her responsibilities are likely wider--she fends off her Father's creditors, attends to parishioners, cooks meals, cleans house, and earns money for the church. She is Prince to her father's Turveydrop (Bleak House, 1853).

Dicken's tale is just one of many literary precedents that come to mind: Sister Carrie (1900), in the depiction of a rapid decline into homelessness; Nicholas Nickleby (1839), in the depiction of horrifying private schools; The Barchester books of Anthony Trollope (1855 - 1867), in the depiction of a flawed clergy; Oliver Twist (1838), in the story of a person cast out penniless on the world and finding herself among an element she had not before imagined.

When the book departs from Trollope mode, you realize that Daughter will be no routine work of fiction and that the author has his own agenda. That agenda has in part to do with the role of religion in life. Dorothy loses her faith, not as an act of will, but rather passively--she realizes one day that all she was taught to believe is fiction. In the end her loss of faith doesn't change her conduct; rather, her fundamental character guides her. Another theme has to do with the benefits of purposeful work; work for its own sake and not part of an imagined universal plan.

The themes of the book are as relevant today as the were when the books was written. Fast reading. Much to think about.
Aurizar
"A Clergyman's Daughter" is probably the least-known of all Orwell's novels; certainly it is the most difficult to find. And if I had to rank it, I should probably put it near the bottom of his book-length literary achievements. It isn't as evocative as "Burmese Days"; as haunting as "1984"; as scathing as "Keep the Aspidistra Flying"; or as darkly poignant as "Coming Up For Air." Put another way, it lacks the resonance of Orwell at his best. But I hasten to add that Orwell at 70% is still better than most novelists firing on all cylinders could ever dream of being. And it has the advantage of examining an aspect of pre-WW2 English life which he often wrote of in essays but only once explored in fiction: genteel English poverty.

Dorothy Hare is the stressed-out, overworked, put-upon, taken-for-granted, sexually frigid daughter of an arrogant and irresponsible rural minister. So pious she jabs herself with needles when she thinks unworthy thoughts, so hard-working she is often delirious with lack of sleep and physical exhaustion, Dorothy works mightily, but in the end futilely, to support a falling-apart church with a dwindling congregation. Though the granddaughter of a baronet, she is as penniless as a churchmouse and in a perpetual state of agony over lack of money. To make things worse, her father, the Rector, is not only uninterested in his own money-woes, creating even more stress for Dorothy, he clings to the fantasy that he is still a well-heeled young Oxford man, with crowns jingling in his pocket and blue blood pumping through his veins. Indeed, it is his status as a clergyman and the nephew of a peer that sustain him even while his church falls down around his ears, his creditors bang at the door, and his daughter trembles on the verge of an emotional breakdown. And in fact Dorothy does have a breakdown, waking up one morning in London with no money and memory of who she is or how she came to be there. Falling in with some tramps, she spends weeks picking hops in rural England as an amnesiac before she finally regains her identity, and discovers to her horror that while she remembers exactly who she is, she longer retains any of her religious beliefs. Unable to return home because a scandal-monger in town has spread lies about her running off to Paris with an older man, she eventually finds work as a teacher in a wretched girls' school right out of Dickens, and tries to find meaning in an absolutely meaningless job. If she can just inspire these listless underfed wretches of pupils, perhaps she will have found a substitute for her faith in God...

"A Clergyman's Daughter" is typical Orwell in that the subject of money - or rather, lack of money - is central to the story, as is the issue of social class and the oddly horrible trap it sets for those who are expected to keep up appearances regardless of their actual income. It is also an examination of the need for faith, or at least a belief-system, in life, and an effective attack on the open fraud that was the educational system in Britain during this time. And in a sense the individual strengths of the book are also its weaknesses. Everything Orwell examines - the Rector's stylized denial of reality, the school headmistresses ruthless, cynical, totally unprincipled attitude towards education, the bare horror of poverty in pre-Socialist England, the lingering and often terrible effect of Victorian-era morals in an industrial society - he tackles well. Indeed, the hop-picking sequences are so vividly and beautifully written that you lose yourself completely within them, as you do in the gloom of the awful Dickensian swindle of a "school." (Orwell is a hugely underrated prose-writer). However, the very breadth of the book's scope works somewhat against it, obscuring what is supposedly the central issue - Dorothy's loss of faith. Orwell handles Dorothy's change from a pious believer to an apostate almost without transition; one moment she's a fanatic and the next she's half-lamenting her inability to pray, and in any case she's too busy trying to survive in a cold and indifferent London to give the matter too much thought `til the very end. The scattershot way in which things are handled gives this book its flavor, but also makes the flavor a bit muddled. There are times, late in the book, when it has the feeling not of a novel, but of muckracking journalism.

Having said that, I would still recommend this novel to Orwell fans, to anyone interested in English society during the sluggish and painful transition out of "mental Victorianism." Also to those who find, as I so often do, that Orwell had an almost freakish talent for writing pieces which on the surface seem to belong entirely to the era in which they are written, but somehow never become dated, and in some ways grow more rather than less relevant with the passage of time.

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