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by Cate Kennedy

  • ISBN: 0802170455
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Cate Kennedy
  • Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Other formats: lrf docx lrf mobi
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Grove Press, Black Cat (January 21, 2008)
  • Pages: 182 pages
  • FB2 size: 1847 kb
  • EPUB size: 1705 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 806
Download Dark Roots: Stories fb2

Short Stories & Anthologies.

Short Stories & Anthologies. Each story picks you up and takes you out of your life and smack bang into the middle of another place and time where the troubles and joys are laid bare and stripped back to their essence with incredibly spare and gifted writing.

New ed. 9781921753060 (e-book.

Cate Kennedy is the author of the highly acclaimed novel The World Beneath, which won the People’s Choice Award in the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards in 2010. She is an award-winning short-story writer whose work has been published widely. Dark Roots was shortlisted for the Steele Rudd Award in the Queensland Premier’s Literary Awards and for the Australian Literature Society Gold Medal. New ed. ww. cribepublications.

The stories in Dark Roots, the Australian writer Cate Kennedy’s first collection, are melancholy but deliberate and coolly exact

The stories in Dark Roots, the Australian writer Cate Kennedy’s first collection, are melancholy but deliberate and coolly exact. They depict characters in crisis, often so mired in what Walker Percy called the malaise of everydayness that the horror of their condition is invisible to them. Some of the stories culminate in epiphanies; others hinge on a jolt - a violent act or loss. I love the manipulation of readers’ emotions, Kennedy has said. It’s like pantomime: readers want to call out to a character, ‘Don’t go in there.

Books by Cate Kennedy: Like a House On Fire.

10 2. Books by Cate Kennedy: Like a House On Fire. 10. The Best Australian Stories 2010. Australian Love Stories.

Kennedy's stories carry so many similar themes to Carvers short stories. They centre a lot around isolation, people breaking apart, love lost, silence, and heartache

Devastating, evocative, and richly comic, Dark Roots deftly unveils the. Kennedy's stories carry so many similar themes to Carvers short stories. They centre a lot around isolation, people breaking apart, love lost, silence, and heartache.

Australian Cate Kennedy delivers a mesmerizing story collection that travels to the deepest depths of the human psyche. In these sublimely sophisticated and compulsively readable tales, Kennedy opens up worlds of finely observed detail to explore the collision between simmering inner lives and the cold outside world

Following her American debut in "The New Yorker," Australian Cate Kennedy delivers a mesmerizing collection of award-winning stories that daringly travels to the deepest depths of the human psyche. 5 people like this topic.

Following her American debut in "The New Yorker," Australian Cate Kennedy delivers a mesmerizing collection of award-winning stories that daringly travels to the deepest depths of the human psyche. In these sublimely sophisticated and compulsively readable tales, Kennedy opens up worlds of finely observed detail to explore the collision between simmering inner lives and the cold outside world.

Dark Roots is a collection of short fiction by Cate Kennedy. It was first published in Australia by Scribe in 2006. Cold Snap appeared in The New Yorker under the title Black Ice. What Thou and I Did, till We Loved won The Age Short Story Award in 2001.

Cate Kennedy collates 17 short stories, written between the years 1995 and 2001, to form 2011’s Dark Roots; the first novel for the Victorian based author

Cate Kennedy collates 17 short stories, written between the years 1995 and 2001, to form 2011’s Dark Roots; the first novel for the Victorian based author. The title, Dark Roots - although having direct relation to the regrowth of the protagonist’s peroxide hair in the title story - is indicative of the importance and validity of the human conscious, a theme Kennedy seems to be passionate about exploring. She has since released another collection of short stories, Like a House on Fire, which continues this theme exploration

A collection of prize-winning stories by The New Yorker–debuted Australian that is “by turns funny, wise, and achingly sad” (Stephanie Bishop, Sydney Morning Herald). Australian Cate Kennedy delivers a mesmerizing story collection that travels to the deepest depths of the human psyche. In these sublimely sophisticated and compulsively readable tales, Kennedy opens up worlds of finely observed detail to explore the collision between simmering inner lives and the cold outside world. Her stories are populated by people on the brink: a woman floundering with her own loss and emotional immobility as her lover lies in a coma; a neglected wife who cannot convince her husband of the truth about his two shamelessly libidinous friends; or a married woman realizes that her too-tight wedding ring isn’t the only thing that’s stuck in her relationship. Each character must make a choice and none is without consequence—even the smallest decisions have the power to destroy or renew, to recover and relinquish. Devastating, evocative, and richly comic, Dark Roots deftly unveils the traumas that incite us to desperate measures and the coincidences that drive our lives. This arresting collection introduces a new master of the short story.
Reviews about Dark Roots: Stories (7):
Frey
Cate Kennedy is an Australian author who has won numerous local awards for her short fiction. This collection gathers both her older stories and some brand new ones.
There seems to be a theme in these stories of secrets and things being different under the surface. The secret lives, loves and ambitions of women also reoccurs as a strong theme.
Although some of the stories are better than others there are no real duds here. I'd happily read her next collection of short fiction as and when it comes out. I think that in time Cate Kennedy will be amongst the big names of Australian Literature.
Well worth your time and money.
Shalizel
I truly loved this book, and only a couple of the stories fell just shy of the perfection mark. Cate Kennedy is an Australian author, and I was not familiar with her work. I have been branching out into short story collections, although it is not my favorite format. This collection is different - I loved the humor, the wit, the charm of people caught in the actions of every day life. Some of these people are at crossroads moments, and what was unexpected was that in the beginning of most of them, I had no idea of the sex of the main character. You learn that as the story unfolds, but first just the voice that could be from any skin, any gender - just...human. The first story, What Thou and I Did, Till We Loved was sublime; a perfect read for me on what it means to love someone.

And the writing! The writing is gorgeous, and thought and feeling flow with each sentence, taking us along on the journey of each story. The unexpected sharp smack of dark humor and the hum of edginess all woven into the structure that is a paragraph. This collection is a feast for the senses. When I had finished reading it, I wanted nothing more than to turn back to the first story and begin again. Which is just what I did. Highly recommended, even if, like me, short stories are not your favorite. This collection shows how very much can be done with so little - fully-fleshed characters and plot and an advanced story arc all in miniature. Small, but not abridged.

"I watch people sometimes, wonder how they can walk around with the weight of what they know. Wonder if they feel like me, stumbling with lead shoes on the bottom of the ocean, swimming in a sea of the unsayable. It's a mistake we make, thinking that it's words that tell us everything. It's sound that breaks glasses, cracks windows, sends cats up trees. Bats hear more than humans, understand more noise, let alone dogs. Maybe we're just not getting it, standing here listening for sensible speech, dying of loneliness and waiting for whatever it is. How do we know we're not calling and calling all the time, our throats so tight with it, it's too high to hear?"
Brightfury
Cate Kennedy is an author new to me. Her short stories are so good that I was surprised I had not come across her before. All 17 stories have an unexpected twist and have a great depth of understanding of the human condition. She is an Australian writer and her stories have a distinct Australian voice. Short stories tend not to be fashionable these days but I would recommend this collection above any other I have read recently. I would say Kennedy is on a par with the very best. Her quote on the fly leaf by Barbara Kingsolver describes her main subject perfectly. "There is some secret grief here I need to declare, and my fingers itch for a pencil". I am so pleased she managed to find one!
Survivors
Great book I read for a book club. Collection of short stories centered around women. The deep issues that are revealed in each story are unique and impactful. Writing is wonderful, easy fast read, kept me interested, always curious how each story continued, writer leaves that up to you. Highly recommend.
Kerahuginn
I nearly gave this 5 stars based on the excellence of the prose. That said, some of the short stories in this collection just didn't convince me; a few of them relied on rather dubious caricatures of the "typical" Australian male.
Raelin
Cate Kennedy, in this her first collection of short stories DARK ROOTS, proves once again that that most elusive of art forms is refreshingly alive and in good hands and reminds us that good writers keep coming out of Australia. In these 17 stories, 14 of which have been previously published, Ms. Kennedy with a deft turn of phrase and in concise language creates protagonists, both men and women, whom we are hard put to dislike or at the very least not emphasize with, even when they commit violent acts. Several of these characters attempt to right a wrong as they see it. In "Direct Action," one of my favorite stories, Gary Sutherland, an unemployed welder, commits an act of sabotage against a papermill, where the executives have paid a lot of money "to give toilet paper a good image." In "Angel," Mai, who is a Vietnamese woman living in Australia, confronted with a parent's worst nightmare, child molestation, takes the law into her own hands. In "The Testosterone Club," the narrator literally gets revenge on her husband-- who "didn't excel at any one sport; he watched them equally"-- and his two TV-watching-cronies who falsely accuse her of coming on to them when it is the other way around.

Kennedy is completely at home examining the relationships between men and woman and the distance that couples can travel from each other. Often one or both of them are not honest and don't talk to each other as they become mired down in relationships with a short shelf life. On the other hand, often the love between parents and children is palpable. In "Flotsam" the narrator's remembrance of her mother is worthy of the best writing of Eudora Welty. "When my mother died, my brother sent me some of her things. . . some embroidered linen and personal items packed in a box. . . But it was not the thought of this that cut me most deeply, but her preserved wedding presents: the rolled white gloves, her empty 'Evening in Paris' perfume bottle, her foolish proud hope." This passage wil tear the heart right out of you. Or Gary Sutherland's dscription of his loving father, forced to retire 15 years too early, as Gary has his day in court: "As I walk out, I catch sight of my father, down the back, head up, worth ten of the bastards in suits." Neither irony or surprise endings are strangers to Ms. Kennedy. DARK ROOTS reminds me of the early fiction of the U. S. writer Ann Beattie, CHILLY SCENES OF WINTER, that one reviewer described as having characters somewhere beyond despair.

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