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by Susan Stewart

  • ISBN: 0226774546
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Susan Stewart
  • Subcategory: Poetry
  • Other formats: mbr lrf lrf lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press (September 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 120 pages
  • FB2 size: 1415 kb
  • EPUB size: 1337 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 495
Download Red Rover (Phoenix Poets) fb2

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Red Rover is both the name of a children’s game and a formless spirit, a god of release and permission. Red Rover (Phoenix Poets) Hardcover – September 1, 2008. by. Susan Stewart (Author).

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She is also the author of five books of poems, most recently Red Rover (2008) and Columbarium (2003), winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). She is also the author of five books of poems, most recently Red Rover (2008) and Columbarium (2003), winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award. These titles, along with The Open Studio (2005) and The Forest (1995), are all published by the University of Chicago Press.

Susan Stewart is the Avalon Foundation University Professor in the Humanities and director of the Society .

Susan Stewart is the Avalon Foundation University Professor in the Humanities and director of the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts at Princeton University. A former MacArthur fellow, she is the author of five earlier critical studies, including Poetry and the Fate of the Senses (2002), winner of the Christian Gauss award of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and the Truman Capote Award.

Professional History. to bring six poets and poetry scholars from mainland China to Princeton University, Spring 2017, for symposium on Chinese and English poetics.

In her most innovative work to date, award-winning poet and critic Susan Stewart remembers the antithetical forces-falling and rising, coming and going, circling and centering-revealed in such games and traces them out to many other cycles.

Red Rover (Phoenix Poets) - Red Rover is both the name of a children’s game and a formless spirit, a god of. .

Red Rover (Phoenix Poets) - Red Rover is both the name of a children’s game and a formless spirit, a god of release and permission, called upon in the course of that game. In her most innovative work to date, award-winning poet and critic Susan Stewart remembers the antithetical forces-falling and rising, coming and going, circling and centering-revealed in such games and traces them out to many other cycles.

Phoenix Poets has 34 entries in the series. Phoenix Poets (Series). Gail Mazur Author (2016). From the Book of Giants. Susan Stewart Author (2005). Joshua Weiner Author (2010). Katie Willingham Author (2017). Atsuro Riley Author (2010). Jennifer Clarvoe Author (2011). Breakfast with Thom Gunn.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Poetical Remains: Poets' Graves, Bodies, and Books in the Nineteenth Century. Columbarium (Phoenix Poets). 3 Mb. Selected Poems (Modern European Poets). 274 Kb. Ancient Greek Epigrams: Major Poets in Verse Translation.

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Red Rover is both the name of a children’s game and a formless spirit, a god of release and permission, called upon in the course of that game. The “red rover” is also a thread of desire, and a clue to the forces of love and antipathy that shape our fate. In her most innovative work to date, award-winning poet and critic Susan Stewart remembers the antithetical forces—falling and rising, coming and going, circling and centering—revealed in such games and traces them out to many other cycles. Ranging among traditional, open, and newly-invented forms, and including a series of free translations of medieval dream visions and love poems, Red Rover begins as a historical meditation on our fall and grows into a song of praise for the green and turning world.


Reviews about Red Rover (Phoenix Poets) (2):
Brajind
These poems swoop, soar, propel you into the cosmos, and pull you underground. The language is accessible, but meaning often alludes me. That usually annoys me in poetry, but Stewart, from the very first poem, brought me under her spell. Her use of language is musical, mystical, enchanting. She gives us visions, dreams, childhood games, and familiar stories (e.g., Adam and Eve). Some poems are less ethereal, easier to grasp. Yet, when I'm most lost, I'm still absorbing some ineffable meaning. Her skilled use of repetition and alliteration casts a powerful chant-like spell.

The bird poems are my favorites. She opens with “The Owl.” The repetition, parallel phrases, and eerie tone reminded me of Poe’s “The Raven.” It starts

“I thought somehow a piece of cloth was tossed
into the night, a piece of cloth that flew

up then across, beyond the window.
A tablecloth or handkerchief, a knot

somehow unfolding, folded, pushing through
the thickness of the dark…”

Because of the title, I thought I knew what this poem was about until I got to

“I called this poem, ‘the owl,’
the name that, like a key, locked out the dark

and later let me close my book and sleep
a winter dream….”

Some of her most effective repetition is in the tragic poem, “Elegy Against the Massacre at the Amish School in West Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania, Autumn 2006.” Each short stanza begins with the names of five girls killed, but changes the order of the names. This is followed by only three lines of text before repeating the names. We, like the bereaved families, are struck with the blow of loss again and again. Aside from the naming order, the first and last stanza are the same:

“Lena, Mary Liz, and Anna Mae
Marian, Naomi Rose
when time has stopped
where time has slowed
the horses wear the rain”

I’ll close with one of the simplest, most easily understood poems, “Wrens,” so opposite in tone from “The Owl.” It reminds me, in its exuberance, of Gerard Manley Hopkins. Beginning “their tumbling joy,” it closes

“I would not
lose them
could not lose
them know
if there’s
another
place another
world another life
there must be wrens.”
Braendo
The problem I have with this book of poems is common enough - a profusion of ingenious (in the bad sense of the word) ideas without any care for the final form or organization. John Glassco has said that the sine qua non requirement of a good poem is that it has a beginning, a middle, and an end - an Aristotelian and indispensible elucidation. There's scarcely a poem here! None progresses from a beginning to a cogent ending; and none possesses that inner, as opposed to external, necessity that we identify with true art. The external is all too evident; and so much depends on the (limited) power of sheer repetition.

A poem commemorating a massacre of school children, for example, is an interminable series of stanzas, each beginning with a permutation of the victims' names, followed by three lines similarly evoking grief and pain. The poetry is never better than this: "when time has stopped / where time has slowed / the horses wear the rain." (And this isn't even the most repetitive or solemn poem in the book.) What's the point? And that's the question. I think that for Stewart poetry is mainly ritual, to be experienced in a certain frame of mind, almost like liturgy. Certainly the poems themselves - their images and sounds - do not reward the attention. Even a modernization of Chaucer's "The Former Age" - whose place in this book I can't even begin to make out - manages to destroy all of its music, as well as its bite.

We may say with Mallarme that poems are made not of ideas but of words, which implies long, material practice. And the test for the worth of any poem is whether its shape (its negative as it were) remains in the mind, when the book isn't there, there to lure you from time to time to another reading. I'm sorry to be so negative, but were are glutted with mediocre writing, and reviewers (even Amazon.com reviewers) would serve the public better by applying more rigorous standards.

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