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by Keith Harrison,Helen Cooper

  • ISBN: 0199540160
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Keith Harrison,Helen Cooper
  • Subcategory: Poetry
  • Other formats: docx doc lrf lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (January 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 160 pages
  • FB2 size: 1780 kb
  • EPUB size: 1518 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 484
Download Sir Gawain and The Green Knight (Oxford World's Classics) fb2

FREE shipping on qualifying offers Australian born-poet and translator Keith Harrison taught for 30 years at Carleton College, Minnesota.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is probably the most skillfuly told story in the whole of the English Arthurian cycle. Originating from the north-west midlands of England. Australian born-poet and translator Keith Harrison taught for 30 years at Carleton College, Minnesota. He has published many books of poetry and translation including Points in a Journey (Macmillan), The Basho Poems (Minneapolis) and A Burning of Applewood (Northfield, Black Willow).

The finest translation in and for our time' (Kevin Crossley-Holland) Sir Gawain and The Green Knight, with its intricate plot of enchantment and betrayal is probably the most skilfully told story in the whole of the English Arthurian cycle. Originating from the north-west midlands of England, it is based on two separate and very ancient Celtic motifs of the Beheading and the Exchange of Winnings, brought together by the anonymous 14th century poet.

Oxford World's Classics. The finest translation in and for our time'. Kevin Crossley-Holland). Sir Gawain and The Green Knight, with its intricate plot of enchantment and betrayal is probably the most skilfully told story in the whole of the English Arthurian cycle.

About Keith Harrison.

Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more. The finest translation in and for our time' (Kevin Crossley-Holland) Sir Gawain and The Green Knight, with its intricate plot of enchantment and betrayal is probably the most skilfully told story in the whole of the English Arthurian cycle.

he finest translation in and for our time' (Kevin Crossley-Holland) Sir Gawain and The Green Knight, with its intricate plot of enchantment and betrayal is probably the most skilfully told story in the whole of the English Arthurian cycle

he finest translation in and for our time' (Kevin Crossley-Holland) Sir Gawain and The Green Knight, with its intricate plot of enchantment and betrayal is probably the most skilfully told story in the whole of the English Arthurian cycle.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Australian born-poet and translator, Keith Harrison taught for 30 years at. .

Australian born-poet and translator, Keith Harrison taught for 30 years at Carleton College, Minnesota.

Oxford University Press. Серия: Oxford World's Classics. Charles Sisson's blank verse translation is remarkable for its lucidity and vigour, and the Introduction, diagrams, maps, and notes by David Higgins provide the reader with invaluable guidance

Oxford University Press. Charles Sisson's blank verse translation is remarkable for its lucidity and vigour, and the Introduction, diagrams, maps, and notes by David Higgins provide the reader with invaluable guidance. Described variously as the greatest poem of the European Middle Ages and, because of the author's evangelical purpose, the & Gospel', the Divine Comedy is central to th.09.

Books, Comics & Magazines. Antiquarian & Collectable Books. sir gawain and the green knight. 3 new & refurbished from £. 0. Sir Gawain and The Green Knight (Oxford World's Classics),Helen Cooper, Keith H. £. 8. Skip to page navigation.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is probably the most skillfuly told story in the whole of the English Arthurian cycle. Originating from the north-west midlands of England, it is based on two ancient Celtic motifs--the Beheading and the Exchange of Winnings--brought together by the anonymous 14th century author. Acclaimed poet Keith Harrison's new translation uses a modern alliterative pattern which subtly echoes the music of the original at the same time it strives for fidelity. This is the most generously annotated edition available, complete with a detailed introduction which situates the work in the context of Arthurian Romance and analyzes its poetics and narrative structure.About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
Reviews about Sir Gawain and The Green Knight (Oxford World's Classics) (7):
Xellerlu
I loved the flow of the poem and the goodness of the story!I have been reading great western literature for over 3 years for a teaching course i have been taking. This is one of my favorites!
OTANO
Cheaper then in stores. A great read.
SadLendy
1. This is not a comment on the original text of Sir Gawain nor on the translation. See above 4 -5 star reviews, which are about the PAPERBACK.
I give 5 stars for the book itself.

2. This review is for the Kindle version. AS WITH MANY CLASSICS titles (i.e. works in the Western Cannon), THE KINDLE VERSION IS A MESS.
--One cannot highlight individual words or make notes on individual words or lines, forcing one to write one note per page.
--The endnotes are not hyperlinked. One of the advantages of ebook over traditional is hyperlinks. This doesn't have those in the text itself.
--Because one cannot highlight individual words, one cannot use the dictionary/Wikipedia options.

3. If this book were free, some problems would be acceptable. But it's not free. It provides LESS VALUE than the printed book and many versions of free or $0.99 books.

4. Amazon needs to stop contributing to the decline of Western civilization and clean up its sloppy handling of our classic works, especially those in translation.
--Until these problems are fixed, keep Kindle reviews and general book reviews separate.
--Be careful about what translation someone is actually purchasing. I'll pay $8 for a good translation but I should get the creaky 19th century translation for free.
--Treat these books with the same care re: technology as others. We want even more to take notes and look up words and flip back and forth between sections in these books. Just because one reads a book written in the Middle Ages doesn't mean one will accept Middle Ages standards of text (when most people had no access to good literature, burned witches, died of the plague, etc.).

In sum, buy the paper version. Poke Amazon into making Kindle versions of The Odyssey, The Aeneid, The Metamorphoses, Sir Gawain, Arthur, Beowulf, etc. readable and in the most current translations. Good companies care about SERVICE (and making a buck).
Darkraven
The kindle edition of the Oxford World's Classics edition has been corrected; the notes are now hyperlinked.

Of course, the work itself is one of the greatest of Arthurian Romances and needs no further comment.
Malodora
The author of this little masterpiece is unknown. This story - or 'romance' if you like - was found in a little manuscript that was written in c.1380. There are three other stories in that manuscript presumably by the same author.

King Arthur, his wife Guinevere, and the Knights of The Round Table are celebrating Christmas and New Year at the famous castle 'Camelot'. One evening a huge knight on horseback bursts into the Hall during dinner, brandishing a large and fearsome battle-axe. Everything about him is green, not only his armor - as one might expect - but also his face, his hair, and even his horse. He has come in peace as he is advertising more than once. In short he says: who is bold enough to step forward and try to chop my head off with this battle-axe? But after one year and a day it will be my turn to deal a blow. Gawain, one of the Knights of The Round Table, steps forward, takes the axe and beheads the Green Knight. As if nothing happened the Green Knight picks up his head, takes it under his arm and the head says: a year and one day from now it will be my turn to give you a blow. You have to promise that you will come looking for me. You can find me at the Green Chapel ( It's almost a joke but who knows? Maybe this is all just a joke ). If you survive my blow I will give you a great reward. The Knight doesn't want to say where the Green Chapel can be found. It's far away from here but you will find people who can show you the way. And remember, you promised. And so the adventure begins for Gawain. He has to go without a companion. He stands on his own for that was a part of the deal.

This Fantasy element is the only one in the story. Everything else is realistic. That could be an indication that some scholars are right when they say that the Green Knight is a symbol for the reviving of Nature after the winter. There is a parallel between this symbolism and Gawain who's becoming more mature as the story unfolds. Throughout the story he's tempted in many ways to betray his vow of chastity and loyalty to the Virgin Mary, and near the end of the story he's tempted into cowardice. After all is said and done Gawain has a more realistic view on knighthood. He becomes adult and reaches a new stage in his life just like the revival of Nature by the Green Knight.

One of the things I like in this medieval romance are the hunting scenes described very vividly and in great detail. It starts with a description of the animal they want to hunt down: its strong and weak points. During the chase it is as if you can hear the horns blow and the shouts of the hunters, the barking of the hounds and the grunting of the wounded animal and it ends with the cutting of the meat after the bowels are given to the hounds as a reward.

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