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by Crystal Williams

  • ISBN: 0870135481
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Crystal Williams
  • Subcategory: Poetry
  • Other formats: docx doc lrf azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Michigan State University Press; First edition (March 31, 2000)
  • Pages: 76 pages
  • FB2 size: 1532 kb
  • EPUB size: 1881 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 347
Download Kin fb2

Crystal Williams’s most popular book is Kin.

Books by Crystal Williams. Showing 14 distinct works. Kin by. Crystal Williams (Goodreads Author).

Read Kin, by Crystal Williams online on Bookmate – In her first book-length collection of poetry, Crystal Williams utilizes memory and music as she lyrically weaves her way through American cultu.

Read Kin, by Crystal Williams online on Bookmate – In her first book-length collection of poetry, Crystal Williams utilizes memory and music as she lyrically weaves her way through American cult. In her first book-length collection of poetry, Crystal Williams utilizes memory and music as she lyrically weaves her way through American culture, pointing to the ways in which alienation, loss, and sensed otherness are corollaries of recent phenomena. Williams writes about being adopted by an interracial couple, a jazz pianist/Ford Foundry worker and a school psychologist, and how that has affected her development as an African American woman.

Current City and Home Town. King George, Virginia. Spotsylvania, Virginia.

Crystal Williams is the author of Troubled Tongues, winner of the 2009 Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Prize, finalist for the 2009 Oregon Book Award, and shortlisted for the 2008 Idaho Prize; Lunatic; and Kin. She currently serves as associate vice president and chief diversity officer at Bates College, where she is also professor of English.

Kin - Libro electrónico escrito por Crystal Williams. Lee este libro en la app de Google Play Libros en tu PC o dispositivo Android o iOS. Descarga Kin para leerlo sin conexión, destacar texto, agregar marcadores o tomar notas. In her first book-length collection of poetry, Crystal Williams utilizes memory and music as she lyrically weaves her way through American culture, pointing to the ways in which alienation, loss, and sensed "otherness" are corollaries of recent phenomena.

William King (born 1959), also known as Bill King, is a British writer of a number of science fiction and fantasy books, most notably in Games Workshop's Warhammer and Warhammer 40,000 series.

William King (born 1959), also known as Bill King, is a British writer of a number of science fiction and fantasy books, most notably in Games Workshop's Warhammer and Warhammer 40,000 series, published by Games Workshop's fiction arm Black Library. King wrote Trollslayer (1999), the first novel for the Black Library label. His most memorable characters, Gotrek and Felix, have appeared in a series of novels, beginning with Trollslayer, a collection of previously published and new short stories

Crystal Williams - Crystal Williams is the author of four poetry collections, including Detroit as. .Kin (Michigan State University Press, 2000). Williams also served as a faculty member at Reed College for eleven years before being appointed the college’s inaugural Dean for Institutional Diversity.

Crystal Williams - Crystal Williams is the author of four poetry collections, including Detroit as Barn (University of Washington Press, 2014) . She served as associate vice president, chief diversity officer, and professor of English at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine.

Williams was raised in Detroit, Mich. and spent her summers in Madrid and Mexico. Troubled Tounges" won the 2009 Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Prize, was a finalist for the 2009 Oregon Book Award and shortlisted for the Idaho Prize. She completed a bachelor of arts degree from New York University and also holds a master of fine arts from Cornell University. Her new collection, "Walking the Cemetery: Detroit Poems," is expected to be out soon. Other other works include "Lunatic" (2002), and "Kin" (2000).

In her first book-length collection of poetry, Crystal Williams utilizes memory and music as she lyrically weaves her way through American culture, pointing to the ways in which alienation, loss, and sensed "otherness" are corollaries of recent phenomena.

In her first book-length collection of poetry, Crystal Williams utilizes memory and music as she lyrically weaves her way through American culture, pointing to the ways in which alienation, loss, and sensed "otherness" are corollaries of recent phenomena. Williams writes about being adopted by an interracial couple, a jazz pianist/Ford Foundry worker and a school psychologist, and how that has affected her development as an African American woman. She tries to work out the answers to many difficult questions: in what way do African American artists define themselves? What do they owe the culture and what does it owe them? To what extent does our combined national memory inform our individual selves? These poems are steeped in the black literary tradition. They are brimming over with the oral tradition that Williams perfected while spending years on the poetry "slam" circuit. This, combined with her musical upbringing, give the collection not only a sense of urgency, but also a rhythm, a breath all its own. Kin tackles not only racial issues, but also the troubling realities of violent acts that can occur, especially in our inner cities. But more importantly, the landscape that Williams creates offers readers an alternative to the racial/political dichotomy in which we all live. Overall, the book resonates with a message of reconciliation that will leave the reader uplifted.


Reviews about Kin (6):
Risky Strong Dromedary
I came across Crystal Williams' poetry by viewing her slam poem Aunt Jamima (I may have spelled that wrong) and loved it. My research lead me to this book and I love it. I pictured her reading it as I read it.
VariesWent
Antionette Gipson

Kin
By Crystal Williams

“Kin” by Crystal Williams is one of the best modern day urbanized poetry books that I have read. Each vigorous, energetic, and vibrant piece of writing had me yearning for more of Williams infectious yet brilliantly captivating fictitious narratives with the turn of every page. I found it hard to detach myself from Crystals imaginary grasp as she leads the expedition of her nearest and dearest kinsfolk tales. Crystal Williams does a phenomenal job taking her readers on an urban allusion roller coaster ride of psychological emotions of love and death, family and adoption, to good ole Saturday morning gossip while watching the boogieman run, with her hysterical and heart felt illustrations.
This book will keep its readers wanting more and more as they try and hold on and dance to Williams musical ups and downs of loving relationships or the lack there of. It will have one pondering over the thoughts that “Hey A” (Mr. Sausage Lips) might exactly be written about their last intimate relationship. Each passage had me contemplating if I were kin to Crystal or just one of her Sister girls from around the way. Her poetry will have you deliberating if Williams experience the same relationship stumbling blocks as you or if she just stole a copy of your personal diary and is displaying all your failures in the love department publicly.
We all belong to a specific group of people that makes up our typical family units and Williams kinfolks will remind you of the average worrying mothers, to the can’t keep a secret “Refrigerator Mouth” sister, down to the slurred speech, forgetful uncle whose high cholesterol is making stupid that he mistakenly walks in the closet instead of the outside door. Everyone is guaranteed to see a family resemblance throughout this book. While under Crystals hypnosis you can hear the children running, crying, laughing, getting whopping’s and yelled at while savoring the smell as “Everybody waits for them collard greens.” I questioned myself on if this was in fact only writing on a page or rather it was my actual surroundings.
“Like on Every Saturday At 12” this book is good ole Saturday morning Greg’s Beautification Shop gossip while getting your hair fried, dyed, and laid to the side. Your ears will anticipate and chuckle as you hear the next captivating anecdote. Just like a petrified child you will be chilled to the bone while biting your nails as you imagine “Flo girl” running like the “Boogieman’s worst fear” who just so happen to be a “Black girl with God all up in her.” Running so fast that she caught the Boogieman and boogied his ass back!
To sum it up Crystal Williams “Kin” is entertainingly witty, exceptionally clever and brilliant, and superbly impressive. This book will have you overcome by emotions as you reminisce on relationships with other family members, kinfolks and even ex-lovers. Prepare yourself to be amused with laughter, disappointed by others misfortune and tuned in to some of the best gossipmongers.
Ieregr
Vivian Ho
Kin – Crystal Williams

In Crystal Williams’ book, “Kin”, there is a southern background to her writing. It seems as if she were focusing on the ideas of memory through different forms of art. Different forms of art such as music, dance, and rhythm. Because it was very southern based, her writing in this book, greatly expressed old American culture. Her book was very difficult to read because to the mysterious language, and many forms of slang that was used. In this book review, I would like to talk about the content of the book, the ideas behind some of her writings, and my own personal opinion of “Kin”.
The content of the book was very well structured and organized. The poem were structured neatly which made it easy to view. It was very appealing to read. The book was broken up into parts but not necessarily chapters. Since this is a book of poetry and poetry is a form of art, I would not consider this book having chapters. The parts consisted of rhythm, music one, music two, dance, and so on. Like in the rhythm of a song, it is always the beginning of the song. So in this case, she starts off with a single poem addressing the beginning of a time in her life. Moving on from there, she proceeds her way through the book. It is almost having if she was taking you on a journey of that particular time in her life. Because it was broken up into parts, it was very easy to read. That way you are able to analyze what her writing means or what ideas you have to input after reading.
Her writing describes her journey as an African American woman during her time. She uses her poems to tell a story of how she grew up. In her first poem in rhythm, she talks about being adopted. Music has been a huge part of her time growing up, and she uses this element to described what she goes through. She talks about sorrow, independence, and variation through American culture. As I was reading her poems, I noticed that in the different parts of her book, she puts a lot of power in racial injustices.
In my own opinion, the book was very authentic, and also very confusing to me. Due to her language, and the slang, it was hard to read because I couldn’t understand what she meant abut certain words to her story. I say it was very authentic as to how she transported her experiences with her feelings strongly in these poems. It was like her telling the story of a time in her life and as she proceeds in life, this is what makes it so original and authentic. My favorite poem was “Prayer”, it was very descriptive and powerful in a sense of love.
However, I would say she did a fabulous job on the organization of the book, the idea of art being brought out with the book, and the poems themselves. Although I do feel that some poems have some potential, such as “The Masked Women”. I just didn’t understand the language that was used but it not as quite ravishing as the other poems. It spoke to me in cases of the racial injustices because as I was growing up, I too, also faced these issues. Another way I enjoyed the poem was that, it has a lot of American culture, and being exposing to that took me on a journey as if I was apart of her world, and learning about her world.

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