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by Siamanto Siamanto,Nevart Yaghlian,Peter Balakian

  • ISBN: 0814326404
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Siamanto Siamanto,Nevart Yaghlian,Peter Balakian
  • Subcategory: Poetry
  • Other formats: mobi mbr rtf txt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wayne State University Press (November 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 80 pages
  • FB2 size: 1136 kb
  • EPUB size: 1576 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 128
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Father Fisheye Sad Days of Light Reply from Wilderness Island Theodore Roethke’s Far Field Dyer’s Thistle Bloody News from My Friend, by Siamanto (Translated by Peter Balakian and Nevart Yaghlian) June-tree: New and Selected Poems, 1974–2000 The Burning Tigris.

Father Fisheye Sad Days of Light Reply from Wilderness Island Theodore Roethke’s Far Field Dyer’s Thistle Bloody News from My Friend, by Siamanto (Translated by Peter Balakian and Nevart Yaghlian) June-tree: New and Selected Poems, 1974–2000 The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America’s Response Armenian Golgotha: A Memoir of the Armenian Genocide, by Grigoris Balakian (Translated by. Peter Balakian with Aris Sevag).

In his first book of poems since his highly acclaimed June-tree, Peter Balakian continues to define . Bloody News From My Friend, by Siamanto, translated by Peter Balakian and Nevart Yaghlian, intro. by Balakian (Detroit: Wayne State U Press, 1986) ISBN 0-8143-6240-4.

In his first book of poems since his highly acclaimed June-tree, Peter Balakian continues to define himself as one of the most distinctive voices of his generation. Declaring Generations, linoleum engravings by Barnard Taylor, (Lewisburg, P. The Press of Appletree Alley, 1981). Invisible Estate, woodcuts by Rosalyn Richards (Lewisburg, Pa.

Siamanto (1875-1915), one of the most important Armenian poets of the twentieth-century, was among the Armenian .

Siamanto (1875-1915), one of the most important Armenian poets of the twentieth-century, was among the Armenian intellectuals executed by the Turkish government at the onset of the genocide during the first decade of the century.

Translated by Peter Balakian and Nevart Yaghlian. Siamanto confronts pain, destruction, sadism, and torture as few modern poets have. Peter Balakian's critical introduction places Siamanto's poems in literary and historical context.

Peter Balakian is the Donald M. and Constance H. Rebar Professor in. .co-translator (with Nevart Yaghlian) of the book of poems Bloody News From My Friend by the Armenian poet Siamanto

Peter Balakian is the Donald M. Rebar Professor in Humanities and professor of English at Colgate University. co-translator (with Nevart Yaghlian) of the book of poems Bloody News From My Friend by the Armenian poet Siamanto.

He is the translator (with Nevart Yaghlian) of Bloody News From My Friend by the Armenian poet Siamanto .

He is the translator (with Nevart Yaghlian) of Bloody News From My Friend by the Armenian poet Siamanto (Wayne State University Press, 1996).

Bloody News from My Friend: Poems by Siamanto, translated by Peter Balakian and Nevart Yaghlian. Atom Yarjanian (Ատոմ Եարճանեան), better known by his pen name Siamanto (Սիամանթօ) (1878–1915), was an influential Armenian writer, poet and national figure from the late 19th century and early 20th century. He was killed by Turkish authorities during the Armenian Genocide.

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Peter Balakian is the author of five books of poems, including, most recently, "June-tree: New and Selected . He is the translator (with Nevart Yaghlian) of "Bloody News From My Friend" by the Armenian poet Siamanto (Wayne State University Press, 1996).

Peter Balakian is the author of five books of poems, including, most recently, "June-tree: New and Selected Poems 1974-2000".

Siamanto (1875-1915), one of the most important Armenian poets of the twentieth-century, was among the Armenian intellectuals executed by the Turkish government at the onset of the genocide during the first decade of the century. Available for the first time in English translation, his Bloody News from My Friend depicts the atrocities committed by the Ottoman Turkish government against its Armenian population.

The cycle of twelve poems bears the imprint of genocide in a language that is raw and blunt; it often eschews metaphor and symbol for more stark representation. Siamanto confronts pain, destruction, sadism, and torture as few modern poets have. Peter Balakian's critical introduction places Siamanto's poems in literary and historical context. The translation by Balakian and Nevart Yaghlian allows readers to hear Siamanto's startling and arresting voice in a fresh, vernacular language.


Reviews about Bloody News from My Friend: Poems by Siamanto (3):
Madi
If you've stubbled upon this you have probably been looking for it, it's not going to disappoint
NI_Rak
In his insightful and informative introduction, the Armenian-American poet Peter Balakian (author of "Sad Days of Light" and "Dyer's Thistle," of the award-winning memoir "Black Dog of Fate," and of a history of the Armenian Genocide, "The Burning Tigris") places Adom Yarjanian (Siamanto) and his poetry in its specific historical and literary context. Balakian traces Siamanto's development as activist and poet back to the author's days as a student in Istanbul and on the Continent, from where Siamanto not only gathered a more comprehensive grasp of issues such as nationalism, revolution, and an overview of the bruyant political makeup of fin-de-siècle Europe, but from where he also learned to revisit and renew the cultural atmosphere of his Armenia (to put it on the literary map, as it were) by writing his European influences into his own work.
Balakian's efforts to situate Siamanto as an avant-garde artist is done judiciously. We are asked to see Siamanto's slim but important work as something which must have caused something of a scandle. His poetry was as novel and experimental as any Armenia had seen up until the Adana massacres of 1909; the subject matter and its delivery, moreover, was demanding and unforgiving, certainly a far cry from the romantic lyricism that had established itself in the Armenian cultural circles of the day (carbon copies of European Romanticism: Hugo, Shelley, Byron).
In "Bloody News From My Friend," readers are prompted to consider the imagination as a palimpsest upon which a violent history has left its imprint. The twelve poems here are sketches of individual voices lost in the wilderness. The distinctive speakers bear witness to the unfolding of history, to massacres, to oppression, to violation of body and spirit; the many characters in the poems stand in as the symbolic traces of a history which defies forgetting.
Siamanto (Adom Yarjanian) was an Armenian poet whose song was silenced far too soon but whose work, thanks to Balakian and others' translations and studies, continues to teach us something about the nature and value of poetry as an instrument of remembrance and renewal. As Walter Benjamin put it, "there is no document of civilization which is not at the same time a document of barbarism." For his efforts at documenting and informing his audience of the atrocities being committed against Armenians, Siamanto, along hundreds of other intellectuals, was rounded up and executed on April 24, 1915.
Conjukus
Although the Armenian poet Siamanto was executed by the Turkish government on April 24,1915, the poems he wrote after reading eye-witness letters of the 1909 Adana, Turkey, massacre of Armenians could have been written yesterday.
Even in translation, Siamanto's lines slam into the reader with the force of a MACK truck. He writes of man's inhumanity to man, of sadistic rage and extermination by fire, torture and the sword which has been, and continues to be the darkest side of mankind. His language is blunt, harsh, poetic, the reader unshielded from the horror of this prelude to the 1915 Armenian genocide to come.
In "The Dance" the poetic voice says "Don't be afraid. I must tell you what I saw,/so people will understand/the crimes men do to men./.../An animal of a man shouted, 'You must dance,/dance when our drum beats.'/With fury whips cracked/on the flesh of these women./.../Then someone brought a jug of kerosene./Human justice, I spit in your face..." Such lines could have been written about the genocides in Bosnia, Uganda - anywhere and in any time - and could reflect the anger of any eye-witness - or poet - to the indifference of the civilized world.
Peter Balakian, a poet in his own right, took the literal translations from Armenian and turned them into contemporary lines which, I am convinced, contain the truth, horror and beauty of the original poetry. Some things can be said in no other way than in poetry, and Siamanto's poems are among those. I cry every time I read these poems. You will too, if I'm not mistaken.

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