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by Paul Dunbavin

  • ISBN: 1841197165
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Paul Dunbavin
  • Subcategory: Mythology & Folk Tales
  • Other formats: rtf docx lrf lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Constable & Robinson Ltd (April 30, 2003)
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • FB2 size: 1883 kb
  • EPUB size: 1666 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 870
Download Atlantis of the West fb2

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Atlantis of the West book. Paul Dunbavin sets out his controversial theory that Plato's Atlantis myth remembers the submergence of a Neolithic civilization around the shores of the British Isles.

Atlantis of the West: The Case for Britain's Drowned Megalithic Civilisation.

Picts and Ancient Britons: An Exploration of Pictish Origins. Atlantis of the West: The Case for Britain's Drowned Megalithic Civilisation.

AUTHOR: Dunbavin, Paul. TITLE: Atlantis of the West. Paul Dunbavin sets out in his controversial theory that Plato's Atlantis myth remembers the submergence of a Neolithic civilization around the shores of the British Isles. Acceptable - Very well read. He argues that this cataclysm resulted from a change in the Earth's axis consequent upon a comet impact around 3100 BCE. Product Identifiers.

Paul Dunbavin sets out in his controversial theory that Plato's Atlantis myth remembers the submergence of a Neolithic civilization around the shores of the British Isles. show more. Format Paperback 304 pages. Dimensions 130 x 192 x 32mm 38. 2g. Publication date 29 May 2003. Publisher Little, Brown Book Group. Imprint Robinson Publishing. Publication City/Country London, United Kingdom.

It seems the book was later revised and published in 2003 with the different title of Atlantis of the West

It seems the book was later revised and published in 2003 with the different title of Atlantis of the West. Paul Dunbavin has another book dealing and investigating planet Earth Reversal (Earth Flipping) called Under Ancient Skies.

Towers of Atlantis' is different. It seeks to follow where the real evidence points us. Further detailed information on ww. hird-millennium.

Citing sources that anyone can check for themselves, he establishes a multi-disciplinary pattern of evidence showing when, how and where an ancient submergence most likely. occurred; and that Plato’s narratives are just one among many ancient and modern sources that point to a similar conclusion. Towers of Atlantis' is different.

Atlantis of the west is a book by Paul Dunbavin. 27. Atlantis endgame Andre Norton, Sherwood Smith.

All these popular books on the underwater city Atlantis are sorted by popularity, so the highest rated books are at the top of the list. Atlantis of the west is a book by Paul Dunbavin. Atlantis endgame is a book published in 2002 that was written by Andre Norton and Sherwood Smith.

Dunbavin in his book Picts and Ancient Britons: An Exploration of Pictish Origins (1998) claims that the Picts are Finno-Ugric immigrants from the .

Dunbavin in his book Picts and Ancient Britons: An Exploration of Pictish Origins (1998) claims that the Picts are Finno-Ugric immigrants from the Baltic Sea, one of his reasons for drawing this conclusion is that some Scottish river names have appeared in ancient Finnish texts. Dr Ross Samson wrote that "Paul Dunbavin is no professional academic, but this book resembles books by scholars Atlantis.


Reviews about Atlantis of the West (5):
Hellblade
The premise of this book is that a comet or meteor struck the Earth, probably at a shallow angle, possibly in the sea, sometime around 3100 BC, causing a slight change in the tilt of the axis of rotation and a slight speed up of the length of a day, so that the number of days in a year dropped slightly, probably from 360 to our current 365 point something -- and that said collision caused changes in sea level all over the world, higher some places, lower than others, as the Earth changed shape slightly (it isn't a perfect sphere, you know). The first several chapters explore how this could happen with what looks like excellent science and math. Interspersed are stories from myths and legends from around the world, especially dwelling on many of them that indicate that the Land of the Dead is somewhere in the west. The author's conclusion was that this catastrophe (probably not the first to hit us, and maybe not the last) flooded the land between Ireland and Britain, which he points out would, when above water, have matched Plato's description of Atlantis quite well. All in all, I find his argument convincing. While much of the book is rather technical, it is not dry, but quite readable, considering all the science etc.
Hulore
This was an excellent book. The vendor sent it promptly to my address. I was a little surprised to find that the first eight chapters were heavy on geo physics. The author has to build his case of the 'drowned megolithic civilization'. A very convincing story.
Spilberg
This book presents good evidence for the physics behind cometary impacts and for the megalithic civilization of the British Isles predating the rise of ocean levels. Where it misses the mark is in jumping to the conclusion that the latter was Atlantis. The writer ignores his own evidence that points to an asteroid impact event that submerged a large island just where and when Plato indicated. He claims multiple impact events thousands of years later, while ignoring the fact that there is no physical evidence for them then. The dendrochronological evidence he cites occurred because of major volcanic eruptions. He wrote in the mid-1990s without benefit of Ryan and Pittman's scholarly work about the flooding of the Black Sea (which resulted from rising sea level, itself a result of the end of glaciation in North America 11,000 years ago) but which likewise also ignores the same effects elsewhere in the world.

It is often the case that writers develop good evidence and then extrapolate conclusions that their evidence fails to support. This is one such case, as is that of Ryan and Pittman. There are numerous books each of which claims that Atlantis resided at their pet location: the British Isles, Spain, Denmark, Peru, the Caribbean, Mexico, etc. All of them ignore some part of Plato's description to champion their alternative choice and timeframe.

This book is good for two things. It explores the physical aspects of impact events, although it fails to connect them to the real one that occurred about 11,000 years ago. Also, it does a good job of identifying the state of culture in the British Isles during the megalithic culture of 5,000 years ago and how the rising ocean level affected it. For those reasons it is well worth reading. Beyond that, his conclusions are flawed and should be discarded.
Iell
I'm quite the Atlantologist and read (see: devour) anything I can get my hands on. The author didn't disappoint. I was delighted by it! Highly recommended!!
Mavegelv
The author shows how mythology indicates a close kinship between the areas around the Irish Sea and Atlantis. That part is worth reading and interesting, as it throws light on another Atlantis book, "Atlantis from a Geographer's Perspective", which pinpoints Atlantis as Ireland based on a scientific study of geography.

Which brings us to the weak point in this book: Where it tries to explain why this similarity exists. The explanation is so wild that it totally destroys the credibility of the book. If the author had only refrained from those speculations, and written a shorter book, it could have gotten 5 stars from me. But now it gets 3, the average of the bad and good parts.

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