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by Bill V. Mullen

  • ISBN: 0816637482
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Bill V. Mullen
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Other formats: mbr mobi docx mobi
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press (November 15, 2004)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • FB2 size: 1964 kb
  • EPUB size: 1124 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 805
Download Afro Orientalism fb2

Afro-Orientalism by Bill V. Mullen (University of Minnesota Press) Chapter 1 of Afro-Orientalism retells the evolution of the political and cultural thought of W. E. B. Du Bois through examination of his life-long body of work on Asia.

Afro-Orientalism by Bill V. Du Bois viewed the relationship between the modern and ancient worlds of Asia and Africa as a dialectical site of struggle for the future of the races of men.

Afro Orientalism book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Richard Wright gave voice to being an outsider  . Details (if other): Cancel.

In "Afro-Orientalism, Bill Mullen traces the tradition of revolutionary thought and writing developed by African American and .

In "Afro-Orientalism, Bill Mullen traces the tradition of revolutionary thought and writing developed by African American and Asian American artists and intellectuals in response to Du Bois's challenge. Afro-Orientalism unfolds here as a distinctive strand of cultural and political work that contests the longstanding, dominant discourse about race and nation first fully named in Edward Said's "Orientalism. Mullen tracks Afro-Asian engagement with .

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In Afro-Orientalism, Bill Mullen traces revolutionary thought developed by. .Mullen’s book reminds us of just how long Black Americans have been interested in this topic. Reclaiming Black History.

In Afro-Orientalism, Bill Mullen traces revolutionary thought developed by African American and Asian American artists and intellectuals in response to Du Bois’s challenge. Mullen offers Afro-Orientalism as an antidote to narrow conceptions of ethnic studies, calling on scholars to reimagine their critical enterprises as politically interdependent. Afro-Orientalism unfolds here as a distinctive strand of cultural and political work that contests the longstanding, dominant discourse about race and nation first fully named in Edward Said’s Orientalism.

Afro-Orientalism He is the author of several books including . Revolutionary Across the Color Line and Afro-Orientalism.

Reveals a century of political solidarity uniting Asians and African Americans. In Afro-Orientalism, Bill Mullen traces revolutionary thought developed by African American and Asian American artists and intellectuals in response to Du Bois’s challenge. He is the author of several books including . In 2019 he will publish James Baldwin: Living in Fire.

In Afro-Orientalism, Bill Mullen traces revolutionary thought developed by African American and Asian . Afro-Orientalism’s familial relationship to other discourses of liberation is revealed by its fondness for the revolutionary imagination

In Afro-Orientalism, Bill Mullen traces revolutionary thought developed by African American and Asian American artists and intellectuals in response to Du Bois’s challenge. eISBN: 978-1-4529-3535-5. Afro-Orientalism’s familial relationship to other discourses of liberation is revealed by its fondness for the revolutionary imagination. W. Du Bois’s midsummer night’s dream of a colored world’s revolution nods affectionately to Communism’s wedding to happy endings.

With a new preface Bill V. Mullen updates his dynamic reappraisal of a critical moment in American cultural history. Bill V. Mullen is a professor of English and American studies at Purdue University and the author of Afro-Orientalism. Mullen's study includes reassessments of the politics of Richard Wright's critical reputation and a provocative reading of class struggle in Gwendolyn Brooks' A Street in Bronzeville.

Black orientalism is an intellectual and cultural movement found primarily within African-American circles

Black orientalism is an intellectual and cultural movement found primarily within African-American circles.

As early as 1914, in his pivotal essay "The World Problem of the Color Line," W.E.B. Du Bois was charting a search for Afro-Asian solidarity and for an international anticolonialism. In "Afro-Orientalism, Bill Mullen traces the tradition of revolutionary thought and writing developed by African American and Asian American artists and intellectuals in response to Du Bois's challenge. Afro-Orientalism unfolds here as a distinctive strand of cultural and political work that contests the longstanding, dominant discourse about race and nation first fully named in Edward Said's "Orientalism. Mullen tracks Afro-Asian engagement with U.S. imperialism--including writings by Richard Wright, Grace and James Boggs, Robert F. Williams and Fred Ho--and companion struggles against racism and capitalism around the globe. To this end, he offers Afro-Orientalism as an antidote to essentialist, rase-based, or narrow conceptions of ethnic studies and postcolonial studies, calling on scholars in these fields to reimagine their critical enterprises as mutually constituting and politically interdependent.
Reviews about Afro Orientalism (2):
Gavinrage
Afro-Orientalism by Bill V. Mullen (University of Minnesota Press) Chapter 1 of Afro-Orientalism retells the evolution of the political and cultural thought of W. E. B. Du Bois through examination of his life-long body of work on Asia. Du Bois viewed the relationship between the modern and ancient worlds of Asia and Africa as a dialectical site of struggle for the future of the races of men. It was also the testing ground for most of his internal struggles with concepts of culture, nationalism, racial authenticity, and, toward the end of his life, Marxism. The evolution of Du Bois's ideas regarding Africa and its role in the Western world is also incomprehensible, this chapter argues, without careful attention to his analysis of Asia as its fraternal twin in global struggle. Particularly in his 1928 novel Dark Princess, long out of print but now rightfully restored to prominence by the University Press of Mississippi, Du Bois provided a map of Afro-Asian relations predictive of much of the twentieth century that followed.

Chapter 2 examines in tandem Richard Wright's exiled writings on Asia and Africa. The chapter argues that Wright's fraught and shifting analyses of race, and Marxism, reflect his conception of himself as "Outsider," a figure transcending the entirety of his career but most clearly understandable in his writings on colonialism. This same figure can be described as a figure for the Orientalist. Wright's unresolved relation-ship to Western modernity and a Western epistemology superseded his early commitment to historical materialism. As he moved further from the citadel of Western empire, he was ironically drawn back to its telos and epistemology as a way to assess the non-Western world. This led Wright into essentialist judgments and hostile conceptions of both raceand historical materialism. It also eliminated the possibility of a dialectical resolution of themes in his writing. The chapter contends that Wright's exiled writings of the 1950s thus constitute a key chapter not only in his career but in the career of Afro-Asian thought and exchange, particularly on the question of colonialism.

Chapter 3 documents forms of political and cultural correspondence practiced among Afro-Asian radicals during the so-called Bandung era from 1955 to 1973. Black American radicals and cultural workers in Detroit constructed imaginative forms of solidarity with Third World struggles in Asian countries by forging internationalist links through intertextual strategies of exchange. A crucial conduit for this process was the fugitive NAACP organizer Robert F. Williams. During his exile to Cuba and China from 1961 to 1969, Williams became a literal and figurative correspondent for sympathetic internationalists in Asia and black America. Much of the cultural work produced under the Black Arts movement rubric in Detroit also found direct inspiration in Mao's famous Yenan Forum address on the arts, and more generally in the example of China's Cultural Revolution. This chapter will explore the strategy of transnational correspondence as a means of building a dialectical Afro-Asian exchange across continents, and redefining notions of East and West by rethinking the political geography of cities like Detroit.

Chapter 4 makes a careful examination of the evolution in political thought of the most significant Afro-Asian collaboration in U.S. radical history, the marriage of James and Grace Lee Boggs. Architects of and participants in some of the most vital grassroots political organizing of the twentieth century, the Boggses' work stands at the crossroads of important Marxist and anticolonial writings attempting to synthesize in particular the struggles of Afro-Asians as "people of color" and representatives of the world proletariat. Beginning with their work with the Trinidadian Marxist C. L. R. James, up through their serious study and use of Maoist theory during the Black Power movement, the Boggses consistently used a dialectical comprehension of race and class-and, to-ward the latter stages of their careers, gender-to fashion a fundamentally Marxian theory of liberation. Even in moments of contention and disavowal, their durable theory of "dialectical humanism" has remained faithful to the premises of Marx and Engels's assessment of colonialism and racism as the brute forces underpinning the exploitation of the majority of the world's citizens. This chapter will delineate the growth - and movement with Boggsism to bridge seminal moments of transformation in the century that comprises the story of Afro-Orientalism. It will also identify the independent trajectory of Grace's own body of thought after the death of her partner and comrade in 1993.

Chapter 5 will take up the work of the important Asian American jazz musician and composer Fred Ho. The creator and leader of the Afro-Asian Music Ensemble, and a veteran of both early Black Arts and Asian Pacific American movements, Ho has devised an Afro-Asian cultural politics based in what he describes as "new Afro-Asian multicultural music." Borrowing liberally from Marxist, anticolonialist, and feminist theory, Ho's work puts the props back in agitprop. His performances, operas, recordings, and martial arts ballets are dialectical revisions of signal moments in the intertwined history of African and Asian descendants. Each is revised to accord with a parallel or continuous stream of cultural and political struggle emerging from its twin tradition. Ho describes his own radical hybridity as guerrilla theater, or what I call trickster jazz. It summons up linguistic, musical, and political touchstones of subversion and liberation from Afro-Asian culture and deploys them in the service of a revolutionary vanguardism beyond the boundaries of mainstream taste and consumer culture. Ho is indeed liberal multiculturalism's worst nightmare: a serious class antagonist who refuses to re-lease the dream of a Third World internationalist aesthetic. As such he looks backward at the Afro-Asian century and forward into a future where Afro-Orientalism may yet do the work of changing the world.
Bulace
Unreadable and unconvincing. Don't waste your time.

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