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by Ralph Manheim,Michael Dirda,Erich Auerbach

  • ISBN: 1590172191
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Ralph Manheim,Michael Dirda,Erich Auerbach
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Other formats: txt rtf lit mobi
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: NYRB Classics; 1st THUS edition (January 16, 2007)
  • Pages: 208 pages
  • FB2 size: 1755 kb
  • EPUB size: 1511 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 583
Download Dante: Poet of the Secular World (New York Review Books Classics) fb2

A precursor and companion to Erich Auerbach’s majestic Mimesis, Dante: Poet of the Secular World is both a comprehensive introduction to the work of one of the greatest poets and a brilliantly provocative and stimulating essay in the history of ideas. Here Auerbach, acclaimed by writers and scholars as various as Terry Eagleton, Guy Davenport, and Alfred Kazin as one of the greatest critics of the twentieth century, argues paradoxically but powerfully that it is to Dante, supreme among Christian poets, that we owe the concept of the secular world.

Erich Auerbach’s Dante: Poet of the Secular World is an inspiring introduction to one of world’s greatest poets as well as a brilliantly argued and still provocative essay in the history of ideas

We may have all come on different ships, but we're in the same boat now. ― . Mythical Thought (The Philosophy of Symbolic Forms, by Ernst Cassirer · Ralph Manheim · Charles William Hendel Jr. 1965·. Erich Auerbach’s Dante: Poet of the Secular World is an inspiring introduction to one of world’s greatest poets as well as a brilliantly argued and still provocative essay in the history of ideas. Here Auerbach, thought by many to be the greatest of t. Cat and Mouse. by Günter Grass · Ralph Manheim.

Erich Auerbach; Translator-Ralph Manheim; Dirda. Published by NYRB Classics (2007). ISBN 10: 1590172191 ISBN 13: 9781590172193. Condition: New. An inspired introduction to one of the worldâ s greatest poets as well as a brilliantly argued and still provocative essay in the history of ideas. Here, Auerbach makes the seemingly paradoxical claim that it is in the poetry of Dante, supreme among the religious poets, and above all in the stanzas of his Divine Comedy, that the secular world of the modern novel first took imaginative form.

DANTE Poet of the Secular World ERICH AUERBACH Translated by RALPH MANHEIM Introduction by. .

Michael Dirda, from the Introduction. Erich Auerbach's Dante: Poet of the Secular World is an inspiring introduction to one of world's greatest poets as well as a brilliantly argued and still provocative essay in the history of ideas. Here Auerbach, thought by many to be the greatest of twentieth-century scholar-critics, makes the seemingly paradoxical claim that it is in the poetry of Dante, supreme among religious poets, and above all in the stanzas of his Divine Comedy, that the secular world of the modern novel ?rst took imaginative form.

More by Ralph Manheim. From Oedipus to Moses: Freud's Jewish Identity (Littman Library of Jewish Civilization). Ralph Manheim, Marthe Robert.

Select Format: Textbook Binding. Format:Textbook Binding. ISBN13:9780226032078. More by Ralph Manheim. Cat And Mouse (Picador Books).

Erich Auerbach, Ralph Manheim, Michael Dirda. Erich Auerbach’s Dante: Poet of the Secular World is an inspiring introduction to one of world’s greatest poets as well as a brilliantly argued and still provocative essay in the history of ideas

Erich Auerbach, Ralph Manheim, Michael Dirda. Here Auerbach, thought by many to be the greatest of twentieth-century scholar-critics, makes the seemingly paradoxical claim that it is in the poetry of Dante, supreme among religious poets, and above all in the stanzas of his Divine Comedy, that the secular world of the modern novel first took imaginative form.

A precursor and companion to Erich Auerbach's majestic Mimesis, Dante: Poet of the Secular World is both a comprehensive introduction to the work of one of the greatest poets and a brilliantly provocative and stimulating essay in the history of ideas

A precursor and companion to Erich Auerbach's majestic Mimesis, Dante: Poet of the Secular World is both a comprehensive introduction to the work of one of the greatest poets and a brilliantly provocative and stimulating essay in the history of ideas.

Erich Auerbach’s Dante: Poet of the Secular World is an inspiring introduction to one of world’s greatest poets as well as a brilliantly argued and still provocative essay in the history of ideas. Here Auerbach, thought by many to be the greatest of twentieth-century scholar-critics, makes the seemingly paradoxical claim that it is in the poetry of Dante, supreme among religious poets, and above all in the stanzas of his Divine Comedy, that the secular world of the modern novel first took imaginative form. Auerbach’s study of Dante, a precursor and necessary complement to Mimesis, his magisterial overview of realism in Western literature, illuminates both the overall structure and the individual detail of Dante’s work, showing it to be an extraordinary synthesis of the sensuous and the conceptual, the particular and the universal, that redefined notions of human character and fate and opened the way into modernity.CONTENTSI. Historical Introduction; The Idea of Man in LiteratureII. Dante's Early PoetryIII. The Subject of the "Comedy"IV. The Structure of the "Comedy"V. The PresentationVI. The Survival and Transformation of Dante's Vision of RealityNotesIndex
Reviews about Dante: Poet of the Secular World (New York Review Books Classics) (7):
Arashilkis
One of my professors once said, "There's every book of literary criticism and theory ever written, and then there is Mimesis." Mimesis is certainly Auerbach' s most intricate and well-known work, but his shorter book on Dante is just as important in that it outlines the most brilliant literary theorist's pantheon of texts that help him form his unparalleled critical approaches. Dante features prominently in Mimesis, and this work furthers the theories he puts forth in that single chapter with more context for the reading of the Divine Comedy. Using the philosophical histories of Plato, those of the writers who challenged his his ironic claims about the nature of art (something Plato would have relished), and the aesthetic philosophies that can be gleaned from the new testament, Auerbach argues that Dante made the most crucial step forward in the development of human representation in art by allowing the human subject a fullness that was not limited by predetermined factors of characterization and subsequently destroyed the hierarchy of which persons were allowed to have what pasts and current/future plots.

Auerbach' s text is in no way opaque or privileged for only advanced literary students. His prose is clear, showing a deep respect for the reader, and also carries with it a strong, poetic beauty. The latter is a rare combination since so many critics from Aristotle to present day scholars forget that analysis can be art in its own way (Auerbach obviously heeded Plato's complexity in terms of how to write but achieves poesy in his criticism that would make Oscar Wilde proud).

What you get with this book are the following benefits:
-Foremost, a concise and manageable study of Dante.
-A deepening of your ability to appreciate the grand scope of Dante' s project.
-A very bold but accurate theory of representation in literature, along with a short history of representation.
-An introduction to Auerbach' s great piece Mimesis.
-Finally, a more articulated understanding of Auerbach's literary thought, which will only improve your own analytical faculties.

One final note, Auerbach--as the title of this study denotes--reveals a conception of Dante that seems completely incongruous with what we have been taught about the poet. I feel this to be an important contribution that needs to be used to show the staggering importance of the Divine Pilgrim, who seems to be viewed as less and less necessary to contemporary readers. Auerbach's controversial approach to Dante--who is a literary institution--helps to make Dante continuously accessible.
Dynen
I'm not qualified to review this book ("eyes to wonder, lack tongues to praise"). Auerbach was a great scholar with immense erudition and command of many languages. Seemed to know the Comedy inside out, as well as the troubadour traditions leading up to its author. Me, I'm just some white-trash hillbilly. His prose, at least as rendered by Ralph Manheim, is magisterial. His passion and admiration for Dante is contagious. An opportunity to spend time with two great minds and a delightful complement to the rather more daunting Memisis.
Spilberg
Still one of the very best introductions to Dante. Auerbach was without question one of the very finest literary scholars of the twentieth century. His ability to blend close attention to rhetorical (literary) detail with a capacious understanding of larger religious and aesthetic shifts remains unrivaled.
Tetaian
Hyperliterary criticism
BlessСhild
A lovely book, indeed
Samowar
Possibly the best book by the best reader of the greatest poet.
Hilarious Kangaroo
Despite the wealth of critical works on Dante, this remains a must read. Accessible, thought-provoking, enjoyable, it does not get caught in specialists' language.
Auerbach's Dante book was published first in 1929 before the period of his Turkish teaching as Michael Dirda's helpful preface relates. In this book one can see Auerbach working out his thoughts both on mimesis, which would bear fruit in his most celebrated work, and on typology or <figura> that would become the focus of a stellar essay. What is most dazzling about this work here is its simultaneous attention to historical sweep and poetic detail. One works one's way from Homer, Greek tragedy and comedy, Aristotle and Virgil through Augustine, Guizinelli and Cavalcanti. By the time Dante's early works appear for discussion, the reader has amassed a tremendous background. Auerbach's writing on the Comedy is as impressive where he shows the ability to ponder the value of white petals on a rose or the necessity of the Veltro, or greyhound as the foe to the She-wolf that menaces Dante. Also, I was struck by Auerbach's attention to Dante's word order and period construction. After all that, it is remarkable to discover how sparsely emulated and admired Dante's poetry was for centuries after its completion. This little book fits scintillating learning within its 180 pages. I do recommend it.

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