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by Wendy Barker

  • ISBN: 0809313162
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Wendy Barker
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Other formats: rtf azw doc lrf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Southern Illinois University Press; 1st edition (June 15, 1987)
  • Pages: 232 pages
  • FB2 size: 1348 kb
  • EPUB size: 1950 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 256
Download Lunacy of Light: Emily Dickinson and the Experience of Metaphor fb2

Lunacy of Light book. Emily Dickinson asked a friend in 1859.

Lunacy of Light book. Are you afraid of the sun? Emily Dickinson asked a friend in 1859. It is a tradition based upon the inversion of the traditional male-centered metaphors of light and dark. Through "Are you afraid of the sun?" Emily Dickinson asked a friend in 1859.

Home Browse Books Book details, Lunacy of Light: Emily Dickinson and the. Are you afraid of the sun?" Emily Dickinson asked a friend in 1859. Lunacy of Light: Emily Dickinson and the Experience of Metaphor.

Emily Dickinson asked a friend in 1859 It is a tradition based upon the inversion of the traditional male-centered metaphors of light and dark.

Emily Dickinson asked a friend in 1859.

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Dickinson, Emily Feminism and literature Light and darkness in literature Metaphor. Similar books and articles. Added to PP index 2015-02-13. No categories specified (categorize this paper). Total views 1 ( of 2,249,262 ). Recent downloads (6 months) 1 ( of 2,249,262 ). How can I increase my downloads? Downloads.

Wendy Barker was born September 22, 1942, in Summit, New Jersey, but grew . Lunacy of Light: Emily Dickinson and the Experience of Metaphor (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1987.

Wendy Barker was born September 22, 1942, in Summit, New Jersey, but grew up in Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona. Between 1968 and 1982 she lived in Berkeley, California. from Arizona State University and her P. in 1981 from the University of California at Davis. A wonderful book of poems" that are "full of ferocity and rapture, a joy to read," states Alicia Ostriker. Lunacy of Light: Emily Dickinson and the Experience of Metaphor (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1987, Rept. John Ciardi Prize for Poetry, BkMk Press, 2015.

Lunacy of Light: Emily Dickinson and the Experience of Metaphor . New Engl Q Hist Rev New Engl Life Lett. The second section of the book reads Dickinson’s frequent choice to write about death within a tradition of mourning poetry popular among nineteenth-century American women poets.

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"Are you afraid of the sun?" Emily Dickinson asked a friend in 1859.

Wendy Barker states here that that apparently casual query reveals a major theme of Dickinson’s poetry, a theme she shares with women writers ranging from Anne Finch to Anne Sexton. It is a tradition based upon the inversion of the traditional male-centered metaphors of light and dark. Through time the light-giving sun has represented vitality, order, God; the light-swallowing night death, chaos, Satan. These metaphors are reinforced in the writing of Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Keats,but Eliot, Brontë, Browning, and Dickinson use the sun and images of light quite differently.

Barker argues that since light was a masculine tradition, ithad come to represent male power, energy, sexuality—not only to Dickinson but to other women writing during the era. To these writers the inversion of the light/darkness metaphor became a countertradition used as a means to express their energies in a society that was hostile to their intelligence. Dickinson, who read avidly, could not have been insensitive to this usage of light as a masculine symbol—of her Calvinist God, of her father, of all that was male—and of darkness as a feminine symbol.

Emily Dickinson thought in a richly symbolic manner. Her most frequently used metaphor is one of light in contrast to darkness, employing single-word references to light more than one thousand times in her 1,775 poems. Barker offers close readings and new interpretations of some previously overlooked or misunderstood poems and demonstrates that "Many of her most ecstatic images are oflittle lights created from darkness." Inanswer to those critics who have characterized her poems as being piecemeal, Barker argues that Dickinson’s consistent use of light as a metaphor unifies her poetry.

In her final chapter, Barker explores the ways in which twentieth-century female writers have carried on the countertradition of the light/darkness metaphor. "That Dickinson was able so brilliantly to transform and transcend the normative metaphoric patterning of her culture, creating, in effect, a metaphor of her own, has much to do with the genius of her art."

 

 



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