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Download Privatizing Poland: Baby Food, Big Business, and the Remaking of Labor (Culture and Society after Socialism) fb2

by Elizabeth C. Dunn

  • ISBN: 0801489296
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Elizabeth C. Dunn
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Other formats: lit docx txt mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (May 13, 2004)
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • FB2 size: 1687 kb
  • EPUB size: 1847 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 838
Download Privatizing Poland: Baby Food, Big Business, and the Remaking of Labor (Culture and Society after Socialism) fb2

In the land of Solidarity, management techniques seek to remake labor discipline as well as Polish worker identities in accordance with neoliberal ideals of privatized responsibility. Workers, however, struggle to reclaim values that sustain a moral vision of solidarity.

Privatizing Poland book. Start by marking Privatizing Poland: Baby Food, Big Business, and the Remaking of Labor as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In her book, Privatizing Poland, Dunn examines the attempts at transition from Eastern European planned economies to neoliberal . Dunn, E. (2004) Privatizing Poland: Baby Food, Big Business, and the Remaking of Labor. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

In her book, Privatizing Poland, Dunn examines the attempts at transition from Eastern European planned economies to neoliberal economic models. In doing so, she investigates the importance of governance, discipline, and the production of subjectivities to economic models. Dunn uses the takeover of a Polish baby food canning factory by the American company Gerber as a case study for this investigation. In Polish translation, Prywatyzujac Polske, 2008, Warsaw: Krytyka Polityczna).

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2006, Mieke Meurs and others published Privatizing Poland: Baby Food, Big Business . Article in Eurasian Geography and Economics 47(1):124-128 · January 2006 with 44 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2006, Mieke Meurs and others published Privatizing Poland: Baby Food, Big Business, and the Remaking of Labor. DOI: 1. 747/1538-7216.

This is a pathbreaking book. Elizabeth C. Dunn is the first to allow us to feel what postcommunist transformation is all about. In the land of Solidarity, management techniques seek to remake labor discipline as well as Polish worker identities in accordance with neoliberal ideals of privatized responsibility.

Book Overview Using a blend of ethnography and economic geography, Elizabeth C. Dunn shows.

book by Elizabeth C. Dunn.

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Series: Culture and Society after Socialism. 4 Quality Control, Discipline, and the Remaking of Persons. Published by: Cornell University Press. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. From Abortion to Reproductive Freedom: Transforming a Movement.

The transition from socialism in Eastern Europe is not an isolated event, but part of a larger shift in world capitalism: the transition from Fordism to flexible (or neoliberal) capitalism. Using a blend of ethnography and economic geography, Elizabeth C. Dunn shows how management technologies like niche marketing, accounting, audit, and standardization make up flexible capitalism's unique form of labor discipline. This new form of management constitutes some workers as self-auditing, self-regulating actors who are disembedded from a social context while defining others as too entwined in social relations and unable to self-manage.

Privatizing Poland examines the effects privatization has on workers' self-concepts; how changes in "personhood" relate to economic and political transitions; and how globalization and foreign capital investment affect Eastern Europe's integration into the world economy. Dunn investigates these topics through a study of workers and changing management techniques at the Alima-Gerber factory in Rzeszów, Poland, formerly a state-owned enterprise, which was privatized by the Gerber Products Company of Fremont, Michigan.

Alima-Gerber instituted rigid quality control, job evaluation, and training methods, and developed sophisticated distribution techniques. The core principle underlying these goals and strategies, the author finds, is the belief that in order to produce goods for a capitalist market, workers for a capitalist enterprise must also be produced. Working side-by-side with Alima-Gerber employees, Dunn saw firsthand how the new techniques attempted to change not only the organization of production, but also the workers' identities. Her seamless, engaging narrative shows how the employees resisted, redefined, and negotiated work processes for themselves.


Reviews about Privatizing Poland: Baby Food, Big Business, and the Remaking of Labor (Culture and Society after Socialism) (5):
Mr_NiCkNaMe
Dunn knows how to write and organize an ethnography. This was interesting to read, even it was for a sociology class. I thought her insights into the insidious nature of neoliberal governmentally were particularly cognizant.
Shou
Wow I wish I where more smarter . I understand it's hard to train a human to work for less that's why gerber went to a far away country to get cheaper labor an spread genetically modified baby food throughout the new colonies. I think the raping of Poland an other countries who where forced into the euro union is sad example of denationalizing a culture that's survived many years without the help of "big business" Now in Poland it's hard (expensive) to get the great natural products Poland once produced. The "Big Business"western food an beverage companies ( Nestlé,Pepsi,Budweiser,Kraft,ConAgra,Monsanto, Tyson,smith land,gerber.....) have purchased or put out of business most all of Poland's great iconic food company's, and the proof is in the tasteless quality Poland now produces. Poland was known for its great chocolate, meats an dairy products now it's not the fault of the workers or the way they worked it's the greed of "Big Business" that ruined it.
thanks to glasnost Poland now has all the worst from the west.
I understand from this book that it's really hard to denationalize a country unless your ready to spend it like George sorros did.
I spent the time an money to read "Privatizing Poland :Baby Food,Big Business,and the remaking of Labor" and I wondered Why America can't keep its own company's here in the USA are the workers here in America untrained or to lazy to work anymore? I think not . I think the reason gerber went to Poland was to get cheap labor. If gerber wanted to help the Polish people it would have gone to Poland in 1945.
I gave this read 2 stars for the tears . One for each eye An I could give it 5 stars for shame.
Vobei
One of the best books on the chaos, stress, and culture shock of post-socialist transformation on the market. The research is fascinating, the writing is great, and the whole premise is really cool. Buy this book!
Togor
Author Elizabeth Dunn offers one of the few inside looks at "post-socialist privatization" that stepped beyond cold war triumphalism to see what "free market democracy" really meant to those fated to endure it. Her analysis of what Western management, auditing, and "standards" brought to Poland, in the micro example of this firm - and more importantly, what they took away - is an important corrective to those who believe history "ended" in this region in 1989.

However, the book has a major conceptual flaw, and the reason I'm forced to give it three stars: the basic fact that capitalism, as known in the West, had NEVER existed in Poland, and its development post-1989 was only partially a return. It was essentially something completely unprecedented in Poland and eastern Europe. Ms. Dunn takes capitalist "Fordism" and "Taylorism" as the theoretical antithesis of socialist state planning, and contrasts producing for The Plan as the latter's essence. However, the "shortage system" was not the creation of state planning; rather, shortages created state planning.

Capitalism in eastern Europe was not at all like American production. In Poland, capital was concentrated in three clusters: foreign investors and banks, and local ethnic German and Jewish merchants. Their relations with their employees and communities was patriarchal - very much like the state in socialist Poland - and their access to resources and markets continually hampered by poor communications and war (military and economic). In Poland these sources of capital were destroyed by World War Two in one way or another; thus state ownership was the only viable means of production in an economy where private property owners had been "liquidated" by war and the existing plant devastated. There was no one to "sell" such assets to, even if they had been worthy of buying at market value.

Shortage was an economic way of life long before socialism. It was shortage and poor transportation that wrecked the Russian economy in WW I, and Lenin's model for development was not Marx but German "war planning." Allocation of resources and production with vertical integration was a scheme to overcome shortage, unsuccessful not because of socialism but in the very undercapitalized nature of the local economy.

Workers' resistance to Western imported capitalism likewise did not stem from the "socialist system," but from a very traditional sense of community embedded in the Polish political economy. Factories were built around the existing communities that supplied their workforce. Craft traditions remained strong, especially in core industries like mining and metallurgy, from the nineteenth century straight through the socialist era. Socialism not only built on these traditions; they in turn were the basis of workers' revolts. The Solidarity movement would have been impossible without these traditional networks not only remaining under socialism but serving as its foundation. Destroying this community foundation is the essence of modern capitalism, explaining why no new Solidarity has arisen to challenge the "shortages" of jobs and income in the free market.

Miss Dunn's great error is that of Western analysis in general, through ignoring the historic context of the Polish and east European economy. Thus she fails to really understand why capitalism was so bitterly resented by so many in the region; a failure of analysis also gripping east Europeans "educated" according to Western models and seeking to apply them with no appreciation of their completely different foundations. Poland and east Europe were always marginal and dependent peripheries of Europe, and under free market conditions have returned to this status while introducing truly revolutionary transformations.
Gagas
Imagine to wake up, one day, and find that all what you know about economy, work, and even food has become irrelevant. Dunn’s account takes you through the shock of the transition, as experienced by factory workers in a Food Production facility in Poland. By the end of the book, you’ll see postsocialism in a different light.

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