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by T C Boyle,Margaret Atwood,Michael Chabon,James Patrick Kelly

  • ISBN: 1892391937
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: T C Boyle,Margaret Atwood,Michael Chabon,James Patrick Kelly
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Other formats: mobi mbr azw docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Tachyon Publications (October 1, 2009)
  • Pages: 380 pages
  • FB2 size: 1494 kb
  • EPUB size: 1150 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 946
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Overall, I'm impressed by The Secret History of Science Fiction. James Patrick Kelly and John Kessel want us to know about the respectable, literary side of science fiction.

Overall, I'm impressed by The Secret History of Science Fiction. Of the nineteen stories included, five were truly impressive works of brilliance, ten were well written and entertaining, two were confusing, and two were disappointing.

Writers like Michael Chabon or Joy Williams, widely respected, use Kelly, and John Kessel, pull together a collection of stories by both writers associated with SF-Kelly and Kessel for instance-with other writers more associated with the mainstream-T. C. Boyle or Margaret Atwood. that Margaret Atwood does not write SF) or discarded (because a lot of hardcore sf fans are guarding their little corner against the stink of what they think to be literary pretence).

Science fiction is an over looked genre in the classroom yet it has an. .This book uses short stories to illustrate the history of science fiction. Discover ideas about Margaret Atwood.

Science fiction is an over looked genre in the classroom yet it has an impact on our culture. Mainstream literature has always kept sci-fi at tentacle's length, but The Secret History of Science Fiction explores the no-man's land between both with. Almost) Everything You Need to Know about Culture in 10 Books. secret history of science fiction -gender balanced -stories by non-traditional sci-fi writers. Margaret Atwood Michael Chabon Don Delillo Science Fiction Alternate History The Secret History Science Lessons James Patrick Short Stories.

Michael Chabon began as a mainstream author but has moved . In the main, as represented by .

Michael Chabon began as a mainstream author but has moved increasingly into genre, to the extent that The Yiddish Policemen's Union won both the Hugo and Nebula Awards (achieving what Thomas Pynchon so signally failed to do). Jonathan Lethem's earliest novels were all science fiction, and there is still an element of the fantastic in such supposedly mainstream novels as The Fortress of Solitude In this history of science fiction there is no way of telling where genre ends and the mainstream begins. Nevertheless, there are differences between the two groups.

Authors: James Patrick Kelly T C Boyle John Kessel Margaret Atwood. more Michael Chabon Don DeLillo. Exploring an alternate history of science fiction, this ingenious anthology showcases eighteen brilliant authors leading the way to a new literature of the future. These award-winning stories defy trends, cross genres, and prove that great fiction cannot be categorized. Two strangely detached astronauts orbit Earth while a third world war rages on. A primatologist's lover suspects her of obsession with one of her simian charges.

This is a work of collected fiction. All events portrayed in this book are fictitious, and any resemblance to real people or events is purely coincidental. All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce this book or portions thereof in any form without the express permission of the publisher.

authors like Margaret Atwood, TC Boyle, Michael Chabon, and Steven Millhauser. This was one of the best multi-author collections of SF I have read in a very long time. With few exceptions, excellent writing, clever ideas, and realized characters. The introductory essay itself is fascinating, as are the pre-story quotes from these and other authors about the state and nature of SF writing. Highly recommended, particularly for those who like SF and have read a lot, but have gotten a little tired of the genre. Harlan879, April 25, 2010.

by James Patrick Kelly. The Secret Is Out Exploring an alternate history of science fiction, this ingenious anthology showcases eighteen brilliant authors leading the way to a new literature of the future.

T C Boyle's 'Descent of Man' is the subversively funny tale of a man who suspects that his primatologist lover . Similar books by other authors. Used availability for James Patrick Kelly's The Secret History of Science Fiction. October 2009 : USA Paperback.

T C Boyle's 'Descent of Man' is the subversively funny tale of a man who suspects that his primatologist lover is having an affair with one of her charges. In 'Schwarzschild Radius,' Connie Willis draws an allegorical parallel between the horrors of trench warfare and the speculative physics of black holes.

James Patrick Kelly (born April 11, 1951 in Mineola, New York) is an American science fiction author. Kelly made his first fiction sale in 1975. He graduated magna cum laude from the University of Notre Dame in 1972, with a . in English Literature. After graduating from college, he worked as a full-time proposal writer until 1977. He attended the Clarion Workshop twice - once in 1974 and again in 1976.

The Secret Is OutExploring an alternate history of science fiction, this ingenious anthology showcases eighteen brilliant authors leading the way to a new literature of the future. These award-winning stories defy trends, cross genres, and prove that great fiction cannot be categorized.Two strangely detached astronauts orbit Earth while a third world war rages on. A primatologist’s lover suspects her of obsession with one of her simian charges. The horrors of trench warfare dovetail with the theoretical workings of black holes. A dissolving marriage and bitter custody dispute are overshadowed by the arrival of time travelers. An astonishing invention that records the sense of touch is far too dangerous for Thomas Edison to reveal.The future is here. Read it.
Reviews about The Secret History of Science Fiction (6):
Swiang
James Patrick Kelly and John Kessel want us to know about the respectable, literary side of science fiction. Although by no means ashamed of the hard science fiction, space opera, and center-of-genre stories of prototypical science fiction, they feel we should acknowledge the "li-fi" or literary efforts that blur the field's boundaries. To educate our reading palates, they have assembled these nineteen stories. They all qualify as science fiction, but that isn't the most important thing about any of them.

My favorite five of the nineteen:

Ursula Le Guin's "The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas" reminds us of the almost-hidden price we pay for our happy lives. We have choices about accepting the unacceptable.

Kate Wilhem's "Ladies and Gentleman, This is Your Crisis" is a Russian-doll story in which we watch two people spend a weekend watching a reality show. What could be less interesting?

Carter Scholz's retelling of "The Nine Billion Names of God" makes me even more tired of parlor-trick postmodernism than I was already. Impressive...

Molly Glass' "Interlocking Pieces" takes place just before an organ transplant. Despite legal restrictions, the recipient is driven to know the mind of the donor.

George Saunders' "93990" objectively reports a ten-day drug trial conducted using disposable lab animals. Such studies are necessary before drugs are used to alleviate the suffering of human beings.

The collection is recommended to science fiction fans and mainstream fans of good, thought-provoking stories. Although I like most of the stories, there are a couple that leave me cold. After a second reading, I still wonder why Gene Wolfe's "The Ziggurat" is so widely praised. Perhaps another reader will educate my sensibilities about this story--I am willing to admit I am missing something. Perhaps such a collection should contain a story or two that readers have to worry over. It's worth the time.
Kalrajas
Overall, I'm impressed by The Secret History of Science Fiction. The editors have done a good job of selecting stories that touch on the border between genre science fiction and "literary" fiction. Of the nineteen stories included, five were truly impressive works of brilliance, ten were well written and entertaining, two were confusing, and two were disappointing. I should add that the ten I describe as "entertaining" would appear more impressive in a more common collection. Their light is only dimmed slightly by the incredible creativity of the five standouts in the collection.

The most impressive in the collection:
"The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas", by Ursula K. Le Guin, is a story set in a utopia with a dark secret. Le Guin draws us to question the price of our happiness.

"Ladies and Gentlemen, This is Your Crisis", by Kate Wilhelm, presents the future of "reality" television and the role it and other media may (or has) come to play in shaping human interaction in our safely cushioned civilization.

"The Nine Billion Names of God", by Carter Scholz, is a game of symbol and meaning played between a "writer" and an editor.

"Interlocking Pieces", by Molly Gloss, is a beautiful story about personal disaster, understanding, and acceptance.

"Buddha Nostril Bird", by John Kessel, is an adventure and a koan on identify and what it means to know.

I should add that I've only just finished the collection so it is more than likely that my understanding of these stories will grow as they continue to unfold in my mind. Several stories in this collection are truly works of genius and I probably don't do them justice with the descriptions above. I hope I've said enough that you'll give the collection a chance. If you're looking for stories that take risks and follow creativity wherever it leads, you won't be disappointed.

Two stories I found to be confusing:
"Standing Room Only", by Karen Joy Fowler, seems to be a simple story centering on a background character to Lincoln's assassination. I don't see anything in it that would cause me to label it "science fiction". It's well written but I just don't understand its inclusion in the collection. If you can tell me what I've missed I would be very grateful.

"93990", by George Saunders, is also well told but also left me suspecting I'd missed something. The author definitely succeeds at making me feel something and I think I understand the comment he's making about certain kinds of experiments. I'm just wondering if there's more to it, maybe something I'm missing.

The rest:
Most of the other stories in the collection are very well written but seem to lack that indescribable element that elevates the merely creative and clever to something more meaningful. For instance, "1016 to 1", by James Patrick Kelly, is well written and fun but reminds me too much of a childhood fantasy. Don't get me wrong, my interest did not waiver for a second as I read it. It's just that the ending left me wanting the something more that I found in the stories listed above. It's a fun story but looks less impressive beside "The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas" and "Interlocking Pieces".

I hope you'll get yourself a copy of this wonderful collection of some of the best fiction I've read in quite a while. I also hope Kelly and Kessel put together a second volume (they could start with something by Nancy Kress and go from there).
just one girl
Great collection!
Munimand
I received this book as a gift, did not know anything about it before picking it up. I am an avid reader, but science fiction is one of the areas I have read the least in. This collection convinced me to change that . . .

Some things I really like about this collection:

Before each story, there are two quotes talking about science fiction and genre. These were really great insights into the writers. In many collections, these quotes are worthless throwaways. Not so here, much of it was thought provoking and new to me.

Out of the 19 stories, I've read works by only one of the authors before - so a true newcomer. This is a great introduction to works of authors. Here are my two favorites, by far:

The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas, Le Guin: By far, my favorite. Worth the price of the book, the shortest story of the bunch. Can't wait to put this in front of more people, just a great take on life, storytelling, and layers of truth. Stands out as one of my favorite short stories ever now and one that I will return to.

The Ziggurat, Wolfe: This is an odd story involving a custody dispute and . . . some science fiction. I'm not sure if I can point to exactly what it is, but its awesome. Some of the best writing and storytelling I have come across. Many Gene Wolfe books are now on their way to my house . . .

One more of honorable mention: Angouleme, Disch: Bizarre, interesting, mysterious. I didn't love this story, the first in the collection, but I think might eventually. It's stuck with me and there is definitely more beneath the surface.

All in all, a great collection, a great intro to some modern science fiction authors. Highly Recommended.

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