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by Kate Flint

  • ISBN: 0691131201
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Kate Flint
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Other formats: mbr doc lrf docx
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (December 7, 2008)
  • Pages: 392 pages
  • FB2 size: 1128 kb
  • EPUB size: 1226 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 963
Download The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930 fb2

Kate Flint's scholarly work is a fascinating and ground-breaking study of the Indian as both imagined in literature and visible in transatlantic encounters and exchanges.

Kate Flint's scholarly work is a fascinating and ground-breaking study of the Indian as both imagined in literature and visible in transatlantic encounters and exchanges. Her extensive knowledge of both Victorian society and culture and tribal histories and cultures is evident throughout the work.

The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930 book. Kate Flint shows how the image of the Indian was used in English literature and culture for a host of ideological purposes, and she reveals its crucial role as symbol, cultural myth, and stereotype that helped to define British identity and its attitude toward the colonial world.

ISBN13:9780691131207.

Hardback, xv + 376 pages, £2. 5, ISBN 9780691131207.

Keywords: Transatlantic Indian, Kate Flint. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

The transatlantic Indian 1776–1930. Authors and affiliations. First Online: 01 June 2010. 95, (hardcover), ISBN 978-0-691-13120-7. 95, (hardcover), ISBN 978-0–691–13120–7Google Scholar.

The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009

The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009. ISBN13: 978-0-691-13120-7. The Transatlantic Indian largely focuses on the meanings of the American Indian for ideas of Britain and Britishness in the nineteenth century, and Flint’s attention to the transatlantic Indian throws an important light on British national self-consciousness. But it also reflects on the myriad ways that American Indians took part in the circulation, transmission, and critique of national and indigenous identities across the globalizing nineteenth century.

About the author (2005)

About the author (2005). Stephanie Pratt is Senior Lecturer in the History of Art at the University of Plymouth, Devon, United Kingdom.

This book takes a fascinating look at the iconic figure of the Native American in the British cultural imagination from the Revolutionary War to the early twentieth century, and examining how Native Americans regarded the British, as well as how they challenged their own cultural image in Britain during this period. Kate Flint shows how the image of the Indian was used in English literature and culture for a host of ideological purposes, and she reveals its crucial role as symbol, cultural myth, and stereotype that helped to define British identity and its attitude toward the colonial world.

Through close readings of writers such as Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, and D. H. Lawrence, Flint traces how the figure of the Indian was received, represented, and transformed in British fiction and poetry, travelogues, sketches, and journalism, as well as theater, paintings, and cinema. She describes the experiences of the Ojibwa and Ioway who toured Britain with George Catlin in the 1840s; the testimonies of the Indians in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show; and the performances and polemics of the Iroquois poet Pauline Johnson in London. Flint explores transatlantic conceptions of race, the role of gender in writings by and about Indians, and the complex political and economic relationships between Britain and America.

The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930 argues that native perspectives are essential to our understanding of transatlantic relations in this period and the development of transnational modernity.



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