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by Thomas Dutoit,David Wood,Jacques Derrida

  • ISBN: 0804725551
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Thomas Dutoit,David Wood,Jacques Derrida
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Other formats: lrf mbr doc lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1st edition (August 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 168 pages
  • FB2 size: 1183 kb
  • EPUB size: 1725 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 129
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Jacques Derrida (1930–2004) was a French philosopher and writer, best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as Deconstruction.

Jacques Derrida (1930–2004) was a French philosopher and writer, best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as Deconstruction. On the Name. hus is not a translation of any French book title by Jacques Derrida; it is a name given to what is a hypothetical book in France. He explains in the introductory chapter of this 1993 book, I keep the word ‘problem’ for another reason: so as to put that word in tension with another Greek word, ‘aporia,’ which I chose a long time ago as a title for this occasion, without really knowing where I was going, except that I knew what was going to be at stake in.

Passions: An Oblique Offering is a reflection on the question of the response, on the duty and obligation to respond, and on the possibility of not responding-which is to say, on the ethics and politics of responsibility. Sauf le nom (Post Scriptum) considers the problematics of naming and alterity, or transcendence, raised inevitably by a rigorous negative theology. Translated by David Wood, John P. Leavey, J. and Ian McLeod. SERIES: Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics.

On the Name (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics). 0804725551 (ISBN13: 9780804725552).

David Wood (Translator). John P. Leavey Jr. (Translator). Passions: "An Oblique Offering" is a reflection on the question of the response, on the duty and obligation to respond, and on the possibility of not responding-which is to say, on the ethics and politics of responsibility. On the Name (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics).

Bo Bergman, Jacques de Mare, Thomas Svensson, Sara Loren - Robust . Jacques Derrida - On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness (Thinking in Action). Jacques Derrida - On the Name (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics).

Bo Bergman, Jacques de Mare, Thomas Svensson, Sara Loren - Robust Design Methodology for Reliability: Exploring the Effects of Variation and Uncertainty. Bo Bergman, Jacques de Mare, Thomas Svensson, Sara Loren.

Interviews, 1974-1994 (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics). Категория: theology occultism, west religion.

Passions: "An Oblique Offering" is a reflection on the question of the response, on the duty and obligation to respond, and on the possibility of not responding-which is to say, on the ethics and politics of responsibility. Jacques Derrida was born in El-Biar, Algeria on July 15, 1930. He graduated from the École Normal Supérieure in 1956. He taught philosophy and logic at both the University of Paris and the École Normal Supérieure for around 30 years.

The name: What does one call thus? What does one understand under the name of name? And what occurs when one gies a name? What does one give then?

The name: What does one call thus? What does one understand under the name of name? And what occurs when one gies a name? What does one give then? One does not offer a thing, one delivers nothing, and still something comes to be, which comes down to giving that which one does not have, as Plotinus said of the Good. What happens, above all, when it is necessary to sur-name, renaming there where, precisely, the name comes to be found lacking? What makes the proper name into a sort of sur-name, pseudonym, or cryptonym at once singular and singularly untranslatable?".

Jacques Derrida (/ˈdɛrɪdə/; French: ; born Jackie Élie Derrida; July 15, 1930 – October 9, 2004) was an Algerian-born French philosopher best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction, which he discussed i. .

Jacques Derrida (/ˈdɛrɪdə/; French: ; born Jackie Élie Derrida; July 15, 1930 – October 9, 2004) was an Algerian-born French philosopher best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction, which he discussed in numerous texts, and developed in the context of phenomenology. He is one of the major figures associated with post-structuralism and postmodern philosophy.

"The name: What does one call thus? What does one understand under the name of name? And what occurs when one gies a name? What does one give then? One does not offer a thing, one delivers nothing, and still something comes to be, which comes down to giving that which one does not have, as Plotinus said of the Good. What happens, above all, when it is necessary to sur-name, renaming there where, precisely, the name comes to be found lacking? What makes the proper name into a sort of sur-name, pseudonym, or cryptonym at once singular and singularly untranslatable?"Jacques Derrida thus poses a central problem in contemporary language, ethics, and politics, which he addresses in a liked series of the three essays. Passions: "An Oblique Offering" is a reflection on the question of the response, on the duty and obligation to respond, and on the possibility of not responding―which is to say, on the ethics and politics of responsibility. Sauf le nom (Post Scriptum) considers the problematics of naming and alterity, or transcendence, raised inevitably by a rigorous negative theology. Much of the text is organized around close readings of the poetry of Angelus Silesius.The final essay, Khora, explores the problem of space or spacing, of the word khora in Plato's Tmaeus. Even as it places and makes possible nothing less than the whole world, khora opens and dislocates, displaces, all the categories that govern the production of that world, from naming to gender. In addition to readers in philosophy and literature, Khora will be of special interest to those in the burgeoning field of "space studies"(architecture, urbanism, design).
Reviews about On the Name (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) (2):
Bragis
A book like this...a review thereof for whom?
A certain amount of "familiarity" with Jackie's style of writing will probably be necessary to get into these three short essays around (and whatever other prepositions you care to put in) the theme of the name, naming, saving the name, keeping the name safe, and the name's refusal to be called by a name.
The first of the essays is titled "Passions" and is the most fragmented of the three in terms of delivery. A bit taxing, really. By way of introduction, Jack commits an abduction by way of "apophasis" -- a kind of an irony, whereby we deny that we say or do that which we especially say or do (OED) -- to bring about the idea of the passions of secrets: Secrets not by being hidden nor by being shared by a privileged few, but the kind that is open to all, perhaps taking on the form of a non-secret.
The second essay has a little more to sink one's teeth into. The subject is "negative theology" as such, or the (im)possibility thereof. A very penetrating reading of Angelus Silesius' The Cherubinic Wanderer.
The third essay, "Khora" -- non-placeable place, the third genus -- is a reading of Plato's notion of that "mother", "nurse", "the Receiver" that gives place for all that "takes place": A placing, a positing of displacement and differance, a displacement by way of oscillation between two types of oscillation: the double exclusion(neither/nor) and the participation(both this and that).
In short, this collection of essays opens up another (that is to say, the very same) horizon of thinking toward what used to be under the care of religion, and as such can be rewarding reading to those who are already aware of the necessity of reworking the language of absence without resorting to what was once named "mysticism". If Nagarjuna were born into the French language in the 20th century, he'd probably speak like this.
The writing on the back cover says that the last essay will be of particular interest to those in the burgeoning fields of "space studies"(architecture, urbanism, design). Interest? Maybe. Clarity and enlightenment? I wouldn't bet my lunch money on it myself.
kinder
Jacques Derrida (1930–2004) was a French philosopher and writer, best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as “Deconstruction.”

The translator notes, “Jacques Derrida’s ‘On the Name’ comprises three essays, which, if taken together, would ‘form a sort of essay on the Name’… In 1993 the three essays simultaneously appeared in France as a ‘Collection’ of three separately bound but matching books published by Editions Galilée. ‘On the Name’…thus is not a translation of any French book title by Jacques Derrida; it is a name given to what is a hypothetical book in France.”

Derrida says in the first essay [‘Passions’], “Some souls believe themselves to have found in Deconstruction …---as if there were one, and only one---a modern form of immorality, of amorality, or of irresponsibility… while others, more serious, in less of a hurry, better disposed toward so-called Deconstruction, today claim the opposite; they discern encouraging signs and in increasing numbers … which would testify to a permanent, extreme, direct, or oblique, in any event, increasingly intense attention, to those things which one could identify under the fine names of ‘ethics,’ ‘morality,’ ‘responsibility,’ ‘subject,’ etc.” (Pg. 15)

He continues, “For sure, in saying that (‘And let it not be said too precipitately…’ etc.), one gives ammunition to the officials of anti-deconstruction, but all in all isn’t that preferable to the constitution of a consensual euphoria or, worse, a community of complacent deconstructionists, reassured and reconciled with the world in ethical certainty, good conscience, satisfaction of service rendered, and the consciousness of duty accomplished (or, more heroically still, yet to be accomplished)?” (Pg. 17)

He notes, “I have often found myself insisting of the necessity of distinguishing between literature and belles-lettres or poetry. Literature is a modern invention, inscribed in conventions and institutions which, to hold on to just this trait, secure in principle its right to say everything. Literature thus ties its destiny to a certain noncensure, to the space of democratic freedom… No democracy without literature, no literature without democracy.” (Pg. 28)

He states, “There is only the edge in language… That is, reference. From the supposed fact that there is never anything but reference, an irreducible reference, one can JUST AS WELL concluded that the referent---everything save the name … is or is not indispensable. All history of negative theology, I bet, plays itself out in this brief and slight axiom.” (Pg. 60)

He concludes the second essay, “Isn’t negative theology… also the most economical formalization? The greatest power of the possible? A reserve of language, almost inexhaustible in so few words? This literature forever elliptical, taciturn, cryptic, obstinately withdrawing, however, from literature, inaccessible there even where it seems to go, the exasperation of a jealousy that passion carries beyond itself; this would seem to be a literature for the desert or for exile. It holds desire in suspense, and always saying too much or too little, each time it leaves you without ever going away from you.” (Pg. 85)

In the final essay, he says, “The violent reversion of which we have just spoken is always interested and interesting. It is naturally at work in this ensemble without limit which we call here ‘the text.’ In constructing itself, in being posed its dominant form at a given moment (here that of the Platonic thesis, philosophy, or ontology), the text is neutralized in it, numbed, self-destructed, or dissimulated: unequally, partially, provisionally.” (Pg. 120-121)

These essays will be of interest to those studying Derrida and the development of his thought.

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