» » Schoolroom Poets: Childhood, Performance, and the Place of American Poetry, 1865-1917 (Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies)

Download Schoolroom Poets: Childhood, Performance, and the Place of American Poetry, 1865-1917 (Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies) fb2

by Angela Sorby

  • ISBN: 1584654570
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Angela Sorby
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Other formats: txt lrf lit azw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: New Hampshire; 1st Edition edition (February 24, 2005)
  • Pages: 282 pages
  • FB2 size: 1881 kb
  • EPUB size: 1179 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 370
Download Schoolroom Poets: Childhood, Performance, and the Place of American Poetry, 1865-1917 (Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies) fb2

Angela Sorby’s Schoolroom Poets is an extraordinarily intelligent, even brilliant reading of nineteenth-century American popular poetry and of the culture that gave it birth.

Angela Sorby’s Schoolroom Poets is an extraordinarily intelligent, even brilliant reading of nineteenth-century American popular poetry and of the culture that gave it birth.

Seriously Popular: Rethinking 19th-Century American Literature through the Teaching of Popular Fiction over as teachers: taste.

Schoolroom Poets book. According to Angela Sorby, these and hundreds of other child-oriented poems, written less for individual introspection than for public performance, became central components of American culture in the period between the Civil War and World War I. She identifies a "schoolroom canon" that some older Americans will still recognize, composed of poems by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, Eugene Field, James.

For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

Schoolroom Poets: Childhood, Performance, and the Place of American Poetry, 1865–1917. Hanover, NH, and London: University Press of New England, 2005. Barton Levi St. Armand.

book by Angela Sorby. Schoolroom Poets : Childhood, Performance, and the Place of American Poetry, 1865-1917. Schools as ‘Poetry-Friendly Places’: Michael Rosen on Poetry in the Curriculum

Schoolroom Poets: Childhood, Performance, and the Place of American Poetry, 1865–1917. Durham: University of New Hampshire Press. Vk, Pushpa, and Seyed Yousef Savaedi. Teaching Poetry in Autonomous ELT Classes. Schools as ‘Poetry-Friendly Places’: Michael Rosen on Poetry in the Curriculum. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Frances Ellen Watkins Harper: African American Reform Rhetoric and the Rise of a Modern Nation State. Durham: University of New Hampshire Press, 2005. New York: Routledge, 2011. Lebanon, NH: University of New Hampshire Press, 2005: 19–20. Fischer, David Hackett.

2005 Schoolroom Poets: Childhood, Performance, and the Place of American Poetry, 1865-1917. ESQ: A Journal of Nineteenth- Century American Literature and Culture, 63: 2 (2017) 297-328. Becoming Modern series. Hanover, NH: University of New Press of New England. 1998 Distance Learning (poems). Kalamazoo, MI: New Issues Press/Western Michigan University. 2017 Conjuring Readers: Antebellum African-American Children’s Poetry, a chapter in Anna Mae Duane and Kate Capshaw Smith, ed. Who Writes for Black Children? African- American Children’s Literature Before 1900. University of Minnesota Press.

As recently as the 1960s, children across America continued to recite in schoolrooms or on auditorium stages poems of strong emotional resonance such as "Paul Revere's Ride," "Little Orphan Annie," and "The Song of Hiawatha." Many still remember poems with soft rhythmic cadences such as "Wynken, Blynken, and Nod" as bedtime verse read to them by their parents.According to Angela Sorby, these and hundreds of other child-oriented poems, written less for individual introspection than for public performance, became central components of American culture in the period between the Civil War and World War I. She identifies a "schoolroom canon" that some older Americans will still recognize, composed of poems by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, Eugene Field, James Whitcomb Riley, and others whose work was read, memorized, and repeated in pedagogical institutions nationwide. These poems, transmitted through schools, museums, lyceums, and theaters, as well as by newspapers and magazines, accrued cultural power through repetition; as they circulated, they functioned as mnemonic devices that established affective bonds between individuals, institutions, and the nation. Sorby's final chapter, on the child-voice poems of Emily Dickinson, argues that her reception history in the 1890s should be linked to the discourse of infantilization and pedagogy that dominated American popular poetry of the period and, to a great extent, continues to do so today.

Related to Schoolroom Poets: Childhood, Performance, and the Place of American Poetry, 1865-1917 (Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies) fb2 books: