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by Michael Moorcock

  • ISBN: 0575041471
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Michael Moorcock
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Other formats: lit doc azw mbr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Victor Gollancz (February 1, 1989)
  • Pages: 160 pages
  • FB2 size: 1628 kb
  • EPUB size: 1758 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 463
Download Wizardry and Wild Romance: A Study of Epic Fantasy fb2

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Wizardry and Wild Romance book.

Michael Moorcock, 1939 - Writer Michael Moorcock was born December 18, 1939 in Mitcham, Surrey, England. Moorcock also wrote books and stories that featured the character Jerry Cornelius, who had no consistent character or appearance.

Michael Moorcock, Wizardry and Wild Romance (Gollancz, 1987)Michel Moorcock would be, it seems, the obvious choice to produce a critical work on epic fantasy. After all, he's written more of it than jut about any living author, or he had at the time this book was commissioned, ten years before its release, after the publication of his article "Epic Pooh" in 1977. "Epic Pooh," revised, appears as chapter five here, and is one of the true gems of this book

Michael Moorcock, 1939 - Writer Michael Moorcock was born December 18, 1939 in Mitcham, Surrey, England to. .

Michael Moorcock, 1939 - Writer Michael Moorcock was born December 18, 1939 in Mitcham, Surrey, England to Arthur and June (Taylor) Moorcock. He was married to writer Hilary Bailey from 1962-1978 and had three children with her. He also married Jill Riches, in 1978, and Linda Mullens Steele, in 1983. He also published a book on Marxism and international law called Between Equal Rights: A Marxist Theory of International Law. He teaches creative writing at Warwick University.

Wizardry and Wild Romance is a fantastic guide for anyone who loves fantasy and wants to find the best, most classic works of the genre. I think this book serves as an excellent adjunct to Lin Carter's Imaginary Worlds(qv), as Moorcock spends considerable time on works published after Imaginary Worlds was written. I was suprised at how different Moorcock's aesthetic is from my own, almost exactly the opposite, because I have really liked Michael Moorcock's own fantasy writing. 5 people found this helpful.

Wizardry and Wild Romance: A Study of Epic Fantasy (1987, revised 2004). See Cawthorn and Moorcock, Fantasy, "Introduction", page 9. The introduction, pp. 8–10, comprises a long section signed by Cawthorn, a short one signed by Moorcock, and joint unsigned "Notes and Acknowledgments".

Book Type: Non-Fiction. Newly revised and expanded by the author, this seminal study of epic fantasy analyzes the genre from its earliest beginnings in Medieval romances on through practitioners like Tolkien up to today's brightest lights.

Publisher: MonkeyBrain, 2004 Gollancz, 1987. Series: This book does not appear to be part of a series. Book Type: Non-Fiction. No excerpt currently exists for this novel.

Wizardry and Wild Romance. 1987) A Study Of Epic Fantasy A non fiction book by Michael Moorcock. Similar books by other authors. On Moral Fiction John Gardner. Shadow and Claw (Urth : Book of the New Sun) Gene Wolfe. Used availability for Michael Moorcock's Wizardry and Wild Romance. September 1987 : UK Hardback. March 2004 : USA Paperback.

MICHAEL MOORCOCK, a Grand Master of Science Fiction and Fantasy, is the author of the ELRIC, CORUM, and HAWKMOON series, MOTHER LONDON and KING OF THE CITY, and many others. He has won the British Fantasy Award, the World Fantasy Award, the Nebula Award, the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, and the Hugo Award, and has been shortlisted for both the Booker and Whitbread prizes, Britain's most prestigious literary awards.

Michael John Moorcock (born 18 December 1939) is an English writer, primarily of science fiction and fantasy . Wizardry and Wild Romance: a study of epic fantasy, revised and expanded (US: MonkeyBrain Books, 2004, ISBN 1932265074), 206 pp.

Michael John Moorcock (born 18 December 1939) is an English writer, primarily of science fiction and fantasy, who has also published literary novels. He is best known for his novels about the character Elric of Melniboné, a seminal influence on the field of fantasy in the 1960s and 1970s.

Discusses the origins and development of epic fantasies, and examines the work of leading fantasy writers
Reviews about Wizardry and Wild Romance: A Study of Epic Fantasy (7):
Tygokasa
"Someone who hates hobbits can't be all that bad", says Michael Moorcock of Sauron. That sums up a major theme of this book, a critical appraisal and historic summary of the fantasy genre by one of its foremost practitioners. Moorcock has a distinct, but carefully considered aesthetic which may not coincide with the tastes of all readers. Moorcock, like a true literary artist, is most concerned with technical matters such as tone, charaterization, discriptive imagery, and irony. He ranks these considerations above plot. As such he ranks masters of style such as Mervin Peake, Fritz Leiber, and Harrison above authors of more plot driven works such as Tolkien, CS Lewis, and Robert Howard. Moorcock repeatedly expresses a preference for irony and conscious artistry over the earnest, serious story-telling one finds in Tolkien or Howard. I myself disagree with Moorcock aesthetically, preferring plot-driven, sincere story-telling of the latter authors to the labyrinths of style and irony one finds in Peake. A major point of difference between my own taste and that of Moorcock would be the works of Cabell, which Moorcock praises highly, but I myself find unreadable. To me Cabell is a mania of ironies and cheap jokes supporting no discernable plot or substance, all icing and no cake.

Moorcock expresses a particular hatred for most all the works of Tolkien and CS Lewis. He despises the Christian foundations of their moral philosophies and writing styles. I wonder how much of his enmity reflects envy at the commercial success and cult status of these writers--I don't seem to recall anyone making a block-buster movie series out of the Elric saga, like Lord of the Rings or Narnia! Yet, he has courted mainstream appeal by working as a lyricist for several rock bands, Blue Oyster Cult and Hawkwind. Moorcock himself alludes to the origin of this envy when he discusses how a self-selected aristocracy of writers will seek ever more exotic genres as their old sphere of practice gains in popularity. This is the adolescent "obscure=cool" mentality.

A refreshing point of his philosophy is his approval and embrasure of the modern world, correctly diagnosing a widespread flaw of romantics as a yearning for an idealised past. Moorcock also likes the works of ER Eddison, one small circle of common ground I share with him, which is fitting because Eddison is the one author who combines plot and style in a dazzling synthesis.

Wizardry and Wild Romance is a fantastic guide for anyone who loves fantasy and wants to find the best, most classic works of the genre. I think this book serves as an excellent adjunct to Lin Carter's Imaginary Worlds(qv), as Moorcock spends considerable time on works published after Imaginary Worlds was written. I was suprised at how different Moorcock's aesthetic is from my own, almost exactly the opposite, because I have really liked Michael Moorcock's own fantasy writing.
GawelleN
I am a huge fan of Michael Moorcock's Elric series and because of my high opinion of the author, I decided to purchase this book. I was shocked to find that he was not a big fan of some of my favorite authors. He seems to have no use for H.P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard who I enjoy reading very much. He also doesn't like Tolkien much either. He does back up his opinion with reasons that are well explained and after reading this book, I at least understood why he disliked certain works.
Golden Lama
Eh, it's an okay read. Some of the things pointed out are so obvious, but that may be because i'm a fantasy author and have known a lot of this for years already. Again, a good read, but not necessary to buy.
Rarranere
Moorcock is well-read, intelligent, and opinionated, and all three show clearly in this book. One more curmudgeonly than I might say that his primary motive for writing was _ressentiment_ that J.R.R. Tolkien gets all (or anyway, most of) the attention he believes due to Mervyn Peake; but he has a great deal more to say than that, and much of it is very good.

His first three chapters, which are by turns the Origins, Landscapes, and Characters of epic fantasy, are excellent, as is his last chapter, a brief survey of some of the better fantasy work current as of the time of writing. (This third edition was completed in 2003 and published by Monkeybrain Books in 2004.) The two chapters in between, one on wit and humor and one on "Epic Pooh," are ... less good. They come down to Moorcock's blindness to the qualities of some strains of modern fantasy, from which blindness he infers that those qualities simply do not exist. Tolkien humorless? Well, yes, mostly; but then humor is not really appropriate to the high seriousness of his work, any more than it would be to Mallory.

If Moorcock takes his iconoclasm too seriously (he also takes a rather large and clumsy mallet to C.S. Lewis, James Branch Cabell, and several others), his praise of writers like Leiber and Wolfe is pointed and spot-on. The worst that can be said for the worst parts of this book is that they are quite readable.
Bil
I had heard about and read about this book, so it was with some joy that I stumbled upon it in a book store a few years ago. I was familiar with a good bit of author Moorcock's early Sword and Sorcery writings, and I was intrigued at what he had to say about the sub-genre in particular and fantasy literature over all.

What this book is is Moorcock's personal analysis of the fantasy genre, with his opinions about a handful of the better-known authors in the genre.

I found surprises here, some that might even be considered shocking to many fans of the genre. For instance, Moorcock seems to have a hate-on for Tolkien. And for C.S. Lewis, as well. Moorcock spends more than a few words in print about the banality of these two, how he finds them boring, boring, boring. And Moorcock goes on the heap plenty of scorn on the heads of those who would follow directly in the footsteps of the likes of Tolkien and Lewis.

But that shouldn't stop any fantasy fans from reading this book. Why? Because those fans will learn quite a bit. They might even have their eyes and their minds opened to other fantasy literature, books and stories that aren't so well known but still contain much literary merit.

Also, Moorcock provides quite the extensive overview of the history of the fantasy genre, mentioning ancient works, gothic literature of the 19th Century, early 20th Century writers and so forth. There is knowledge in spades to be found in this book, and much of it will be new to most fans of fantasy.

To learn of hidden gems of the fantasy genre, to gain a basic understanding from where the genre has come, this book is indispensable.

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