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by Jim Shepard

  • ISBN: 0307742148
  • Category: Fiction
  • Author: Jim Shepard
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
  • Other formats: txt docx mobi lit
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vintage (March 6, 2012)
  • Pages: 240 pages
  • FB2 size: 1499 kb
  • EPUB size: 1510 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 806
Download You Think That's Bad (Vintage Contemporaries) fb2

O, The Oprah Magazine You Think That’s Bad is potent enough to stamp Shepard as one of this generation’s short . One doesn't so much read a Jim Shepard story as dive into his infectiously delicious prose.

O, The Oprah Magazine You Think That’s Bad is potent enough to stamp Shepard as one of this generation’s short story masters. If you've enjoyed his previous novels or story collections than you're no doubt thrilled at the publication of his latest, //You Think That's Ba. / And if you've not yet had the pleasure, well then consider yourself graced by good fortune and avail take opportunity to immerse yourself in his spectacular imagination.

ranks with the best short story collections of the past 40 years, which puts him .

ranks with the best short story collections of the past 40 years, which puts him in the heady company of such masters as John Cheever, John Updike, Raymond Carver and Alice Munro. William Hogan, Albany Times Union Potent enough to stamp Shepard as one of this generation’s short story masters. /

You think that’s bad, by Jim Shepard. Carly had gotten this far by telling herself that compartmentalizing wasn’t all bad: that some doors may have been shut off but that the really important ones were wide open

You think that’s bad, by Jim Shepard. Carly had gotten this far by telling herself that compartmentalizing wasn’t all bad: that some doors may have been shut off but that the really important ones were wide open. And in terms of intimacy, she was far and away as good as things were going to get for me. We had this look we gave each other in public that said, I know.

Enthralling and unfailingly compassionate, You Think That’s Bad traverses centuries, continents, and social strata, but the joy and struggle that Shepard depicts with such devastating sensitivity-all the heartbreak, alienation.

Enthralling and unfailingly compassionate, You Think That’s Bad traverses centuries, continents, and social strata, but the joy and struggle that Shepard depicts with such devastating sensitivity-all the heartbreak, alienation, intimacy, and accomplishment-has a universal resonance. Jim Shepard is the author of six novels and three previous story collections. His stories are published regularly in such magazines as The New Yorker, The Atlantic, McSweeney’s, Tin House, Zoetrope: All-Story, Playboy, and Vice, among others. The Netherlands Lives with Water, from this collection, appears in The Best American Short Stories 2010.

You Think That's Bad book.

From Jim Shepard, one of the most enduring and influential novelists writing today, comes an. .

From Jim Shepard, one of the most enduring and influential novelists writing today, comes an unflinching look into the heart and soul of adolescence. Tender and horrifying, prescient and moving, Project X will not easily be forgotten. From the hugely acclaimed National Book Award finalist, a novel that will join the shortlist of classics about the Holocaust and the children caught up in it. Aron, the narrator, is an engaging if peculiar young boy whose family is driven from the countryside into the Warsaw Ghetto.

Culling the vastness of experiencefrom its bizarre fringes and breathtaking pinnacles to the mediocre and desperately below averagelike an expert curator, Jim Shepard populates this collection with characters at once wildly diverse and wholly fascinating. A black world operative cant tell his wife a word about his daily activities, but doesnt resist sharing her confidences.

Jim Shepard (born 1956) is an American novelist and short story writer, who teaches creative writing and film at Williams College. Shepard at the 2015 Texas Book Festival. 1956 (age 62–63) Bridgeport, Connecticut. Similarly, Shepard's 2011 collection You Think That’s Bad also cites an extensive bibliography, including Avalanches and Snow Safety, The Japanese Earthquake of 1923, Climate Changes and Dutch Water Management, and Satanism and Witchcraft.

Following Like You’d Understand, Anyway-awarded the Story Prize and a finalist for the National Book Award-Jim Shepard returns with an even more wildly diverse collection of astonishingly observant stories.

Following Like You’d Understand, Anyway—awarded the Story Prize and a finalist for the National Book Award—Jim Shepard returns with an even more wildly diverse collection of astonishingly observant stories. Like an expert curator, he populates the vastness of human experience—from its bizarre fringes and lonely, breathtaking pinnacles to the hopelessly mediocre and desperately below average—with brilliant scientists, reluctant soldiers, workaholic artists, female explorers, depraved murderers, and deluded losers, all wholly convincing and utterly fascinating.
Reviews about You Think That's Bad (Vintage Contemporaries) (7):
Rit
There's something about Jim Shepard that instantly sucked me in. His writing is great--you should expect that from someone who's published as many stories as him. I think what sets him apart is his unique ability to RESEARCH, which allows him more breadth than you might expect from a short story writer. Whether his characters are tracking down assassin hideouts or designing the very first Godzilla costume, their worlds are instantly recognizable thanks to the depth of detail. So while "Godzilla: King of the Monsters" (my personal favorite) takes place on the set of the very first Godzilla movie, the underlying theme is familiar and uncomfortable. The details suck you into this little slice of life that you never in a million years would have considered.

Jim Shepard has been kind enough to take you there. Savor every one of these stories.
Frosha
After reading this book, I went back and downloaded every single one of Shepard's short story collections. All of them were good, but none of them came close to this one. This collection features some of the best stories I've read in a long time, and all carry the familiar theme of males struggling to identify with the world around them, to seek out adventure, to come to terms with family and love.

All of his stories are wrapped inside imaginative places and worlds that transport the reader in ways he/she never would expect. Whether it's a daughter searching for the lost city of assassins or the creator of Godzilla working to create a film that will change Japan, the reader is always treated to something greater.
Gann
Well, what can I say. He is a terrific writer. Read anything he writes. You will not be sorry.
Linda
Muskegon, MI
Levaq
I read this some time ago. Freya Stark alone in Persia has stayed with me the longest.

Lovely stories that you can pick up in short bursts of reading, unusual settings, believable characters in incredible settings like Freya Stark.

Recommended for short story lovers.
Cordaron
Jim Shepard is the best American short story writer alive today. He has an astonishing range, and perhaps best of all, he does his research more thoroughly than any other writer I know of.
Castiel
Such rich and enthralling storytelling, that lifts the reader up from their existence and into the scenes portrayed in these detailed and wondrous scenes.
Munimand
One doesn't so much read a Jim Shepard story as dive into his infectiously delicious prose. If you've enjoyed his previous novels or story collections than you're no doubt thrilled at the publication of his latest, //You Think That's Bad.// And if you've not yet had the pleasure, well then consider yourself graced by good fortune and avail take opportunity to immerse yourself in his spectacular imagination.

Other writers to often settle for remaining in their comfort zone; by contrast Shepard stand out for bold leaps in genre, style, and voice, bringing his empathic spirit to topics few others would tackle. . Consider his novel, "Project X," which pushed past the shallow moral outrage that followed the Columbine tragedy and explored a school shooting from the perspective of the perpetrators. Indeed, in addition to his deep research, his black sense of humor, and his gift for characterization, it is his deep pathos, his easy rapport with the exotic, which chimes through this author's work.

The string which binds the stories in//You Think That's Bad// is that empathy ladled onto our common existential tragedy - sure you are alone, struggling, and going to die, but at least we're all in it together. We all want to understand and to be understood. All of us want to be loved. Not that many of us - or Shepard's characters for that matter - achieve these goals. Many, perhaps most, of those inhabiting these stories aren't particularly nice, indeed they often range from the damaged to the outright cruel, but they are all in their own way familiar, even while being impossibly alien.

Real life explorer Freya Stark flees her egomaniacal mother, whose machinations have led to her sister Vera's death, to search the Persian wastes for Alamut, the lost citadel of the Assassins. The creator/effect artist of Gojira (Godzilla) must balance his troubled marriage, post-war Japanese culture, and the pain of his past against his need to create something unique. As Papua New Guinea tries to kill a soldier in World War II, he struggles with a love triangle back home, one leg of which is his own brother. A peasant in 15th Century France finds himself bound in service to the infamous child murderer, Gilles de Rais.

Part of the delight in Shepard's work is how he helps us inhabit these dispirit milieus, to get to know and feel for these distant characters, even as he deftly layers in an array of fascinating details. Ever wonder about how the Netherlands will manage to hold back the ocean against global climate change? Might you be curious to learn that the Godzilla costume was so broiling that the actor needed to be removed from it every fifteen minutes and that each time over a cup of sweat was drained from each boots? Or perhaps you're curious what it is like to be married to an engineer working in the black world of secret military research?

Yes, Shepard answers all these questions and more; he is a sort of time-hopping sorcerous prose genius with a gift for research. Yet he isn't a writer who feels the need to batter us with facts. Settings and factoids always, always here work to uncover a sense of something true and universal, even as they aid in his telling of a great story. More than anything that may be the source of Shepard's genius, the ability to take the most alien of people in the most unimaginable places and demonstrate how, despite vast chasms of distance and time, we are all far more alike than we are different. We struggle, we strive, and we all enjoy a great tale when it is well told. On that last score, few writers can hold a quill or a candle to the great Jim Shepard.

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